Tornado info needed

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by vegascowgirl, Jan 25, 2005.

  1. vegascowgirl

    vegascowgirl Try Me

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    Well, as been my usual thing as of late, I'm turning to the good folks here for help. I live in S.W. Missouri..in between Forsyth and Taneyville to be exact. I am getting mixed messages on Tornados around here. some folks say we get quite a few and others say we don't. I figure Springfeild gets a fair share of them since they are technically on flatter ground than we are. So I am trying to find out how my area fares with the tennacious twisters. Can anybody tell me of a website that shows how often certain areas get hit? Better yet, any first accounts from residents themselves?
    Sorry, but I lived in Tornado alley in S. Michigan as a child and remember all too well the many that we had each year. Now after living in the southwest for so many years where I didn't have to worry about them (we did get a small one in Vegas the same year that Salt Lake City,UT was hit by a larger one)...I want to be absolutely sure that I am ready if I need to be, when the season comes around.
     
  2. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    I checked this out for myself in my area I am pretty sure its on a NOAA or NWS site and it lists every recorded twister that has happened in whatever area you search. Comes complete with damage reports pics and maps etc. You will find what your looking for there I am certain of it.
     

  3. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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  4. vegascowgirl

    vegascowgirl Try Me

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    Thanks DrippingSprings and AnnaS,
    That is exactly what I was looking for. Thankfully it doesn't look like I need to worry about them. I didn't think I would have to worry too much, but after getting conflicting stories I wanted to make sure. Thanks again for the help. I knew I could count on the good folks here.






     
  5. rannie

    rannie Well-Known Member

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    Hey thanks ya'll i was also wondering about tornados too... I just found out that here in the south (LA) that there were more tornados in the parish i live in than where we're headin' NW AR... yeah I know that doesn't mean I won't see one but i can easily see one here :eek: Thanks cool site answers questions Thanks Rannie
     
  6. Sandhills

    Sandhills Well-Known Member

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    Big Rockpile,
    I know exactly how you feel. It's very frustrating.
    I also get irked when I watch the Weather Channel and they don't even mention a tornado in our county despite the fact it has caused major damage. 3 or 4 years ago there was a tornado out here that took half of a small town out, it was never reported on any of the major tv station and definitely not the weather station.
    Also we live near the county line and they seldom report anything that happens here on the local radio station. I've watched tornado's form near our place but they never issue a warning till it's over the county line. I've just learned to keep an eye to the sky during the season.
     
  7. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't go so far as to say that. If you are anywhere in the Midwest (or most other areas in the US) you should be aware of tornadoes. The old myths about tornadoes not hitting a particular area because of a river, a bluff, hills or something are just plain wrong and not supported by science or common sense for that matter. A tornadic thunderstorm is tens of thousands of feet high and release absolutely massive amounts of energy. Hills and ground terrain have minor effect on these things. It doesn't care about that river or bluff or if you open your windows or not no matter what some old timer tells you. Old wives tales like that get people killed.

    SW Missouri? You had better be concerned about tornadoes. Have a safe place in the house and educate yourself on the weather and tornadoes. In the end it is your responsibility to watch the weather and take appropriate action if a bad storm comes up. just because the weather service hasn't issued a tornado warning doesn't mean it can't develop. You may very well not get a warning. In the end it is up to you to protect yourself. Saying "it can't happen here" may be a good way to delude ones self but is not a good way to prepare.
     
  8. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    When I first moved here, I would dive into the basement every time we had a thunderstorm :) I've gotten more used to the weather and now I have a better clue as to what a really bad storm is, so I don't spend so much time in the basement.

    We have sirens. If they go off, I make sure my kids are gathered up and ready to go. Shoes on, flashlights handy. Usually the radio will say where a funnel has been spotted in the county and that gives me an even better idea of when to head downstairs. I don't ignore the sirens or a warning on the radio.

    The most damage I have seen here is from straight line winds, rather than tornados. They can really flatten trees and a woman was killed here last year when a tree fell on her car. There is no warning for that, other than t-storm warnings, but I've learned to watch the weather. When those trees start really dancing...time to go!

    I also have several spots picked out on the farm that I can head too for cover if needed. The house out there has a basement, but if I'm back in the fields, it's too far.

    Jena
     
  9. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    We have quite a few tornados here in central OK, but thankfully, we also have an excellent warning system & the best forecasters in the country along with the latest generation doppler radar. Like Big Rockpile said,many areas of the country are just not set up to forecast or warn for tornados because they don't have that many. We usually have very good advance warning here because everyone is very aware of the danger. If tornados are rare in your area, you could be at greater risk of being caucht by surprise. I would recommend one of those radios that pick up severe storm warnings from the National Weather Service.They will give you warning about all potentially severe storms of any kind in your area. I work nights & sleep in the afternoon & early evening, & I have actually slept through the sirens going off. I now have one of those radios in my bedroom. It comes on automatically when there is a warning,but is otherwise silent. Best $30 I've spent lately.
     
  10. rannie

    rannie Well-Known Member

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    I now have one of those radios in my bedroom. It comes on automatically when there is a warning,but is otherwise silent. Best $30 I've spent lately.[/QUOTE]

    Where can I get one at and do they have a certain name? I diffently want one for when we move up North. Thanks Rannie
     
  11. Mrs_stuart

    Mrs_stuart Well-Known Member

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    I move to sw Mo from the texas/ok border where tornados were frequent. I was worried here too but there has been very little of them. I do watch the weather and know what to look for and i am prepared. I decided a long time ago, i cant live my life worried about the what if's and just decided to be educated and prepared.

    Vegascowgirl, i would say you are in an area that could have tornadoes but they are not frequent. Learn what "warning" systems are in place in your area and be prepared and watch the weather during those "classic" storm times and all will be well.

    Belinda
     
  12. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    The frequency of tornados in an area varies over time and is predictable. I saw a map years ago in a Mississippi newspaper that showed the central part of the country divided into quadrants. I forget how long each quadrant had the most tornados. It may have been 8 or 9 years. I think the highest frequency rotated through the four quadrants in a counterclockwise motion. So if the the SE quadrant was seeing the most tornados, the NE quadrant would see the frequency increase after the period of high activity elapsed in the SE quadrant and continue for the 8 or 9 year period. Each quadrant would get hit in turn.

    So if you moved into an area of low activity, you might not see a lot of tornado activity for 24 or 27 years and then your area would get hammered for several years.
     
  13. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Rannie... Look at any place that sells electronics. I bought mine at WalMart & it was called a Weather-Alert radio.
     
  14. FrankTheTank

    FrankTheTank Well-Known Member

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    Living in Southwest WI i use caution whenever ingredients are there for tornadic storms. If you pay attention to the weather, you can usually have a good idea of the possibility of a tornado happening. You need several things to go just right (or wrong!) for a tornado to form. JUne of 2003 I was in SD when one of the largest tornado outbreaks in history happened. Traveling that night was scary/amazing.

    some info from NOAA
    Tornadoes can occur at any time of the year.
    In the southern states, peak tornado occurrence is in March through May, while peak months in the northern states are during the summer.
    Note, in some states, a secondary tornado maximum occurs in the fall.
    Tornadoes are most likely to occur between 3 and 9 p.m. but have been known to occur at all hours of the day or night.
    The average tornado moves from southwest to northeast, but tornadoes have been known to move in any direction. The average forward speed is 30 mph but may vary from nearly stationary to 70 mph.
    The total number of tornadoes is probably higher than indicated in the western states. Sparse population reduces the number reported.

    As it says above, watch that time period from 3-9PM...I know most of the tornados i hear about seem to happen in the late afternoon (daytime heating...instability)