Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Born city, love country
Joined
·
438 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The post about plumbing supplies got me to thinking. What do you keep on hand in the shop? How do you organize it? What else can't I live without (chances are I already want it :dance: )?

Here is my list:
- Hand Tools -
wrenches (metric & standard), socket sets (1/4", 3/8", 1/2" drive metric & standard), screw drivers, punches, chisels, nail sets, screw extractors, claw and ball pein hammers, wood and metal hand saws, pliers and cutters, pop-rivet gun
- Woodworking -
7-1/2" circular saw, sabre saw, 1/2" 2HP router, 1/4" 1HP router, router table, 13" planer, 14" bandsaw, 1/2" drill, 19.2V 1/4" drill, 10" table saw, drill press, belt sander, palm sander (round and square)
-Concrete and Tile-
5 cu. ft. mixer, pointers, floats, trowels (smooth and notched), tile saw, tile spacers
-Plumbing-
PVC, CPVC and galvanized fittings for water and gas, PVC and CPVC pipe up to 2", flex pipe for gas, propane regulators and hoses, copper tubing and couplers
-Electrical-
14, 12 and 10 guage (2+ground) romex, outdoor 12 guage romex, metal and PVC conduit (1/2", 3/4" and 1"), junction boxes, wall boxes, pipe fittings and ends, cutters and strippers (not the female ones :nono: ).
-Painting-
wall joint compound, tape, 6" & 10" floating knives, mud tray, sheetrock, brushes, work pots and buckets, rollers and frames, roller extensions, wallboard sander
-Air Tools-
air compressor, framing nailer, finish nailer, brad/staple nailer, 1/2" impact wrench, 3/8" ratchet, air hammer (with chisel, tie-rod fork, metal cutter), paint sprayer, die grinder
-Utility-
extension ladders (16' and 24'), step ladders (6', 8' and 12'), tarps, utility trailer, 5.5KW generator, portable worksite lights
-Logging-
18" chainsaw, 14" chainsaw, hydraulic splitter, axe, wedges (no band mill :Bawling: )
-Fencing-
6' and 10' t-posts, field fence, barbed and barbless fence wire, clips, gate hindges, post driver, fencing pliers and stretchers, 10# tamper

Tractors and Implements would be a different list.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,158 Posts
Great kist Chuckhole, but my goodness to list every small tool I feel I need and have............... Ummmm I just can't even imagine how long that would take, I'm a tool-a-holic surrounded by other tool-a-holics here. So I'll limit myself to making a suggestion. You need a good multimeter. Now how to organise stuff, that's a smaller bite at a big topic, I use lots of task oriented bags and boxes, (liking bags more and more) bins and even the trusted and true nails in the wall. Nothing very original though so it would be great to hear how people keep it all together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
A suggestion for hardware storage. Old metal or wood card catalog file cabinets. Inquire at local libraries and watch for surplus property auctions.

You will probably have to make a rear wall and dividers for the drawers. Easy to do and that's why they are usually cheap. Nobody willing to expend the effort to convert them.

Excellent storage for bolts,nuts, etc. The drawers can be removed from the cabinet and taken to the job.
 

·
Born city, love country
Joined
·
438 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Ross,
The list is what I have accumulated over the years and thanks for the suggestion. I do not have a good multimeter. This is an area where I am ashamed to admit that I have purchased a cheap one that is worthless.

WayneR,
I have never been to a surplus property auction. How do you find them? Until 3-1/2 years ago, I have lead a sheltered city life. I didn't even know that Tractor Supply existed until then. My midlife crisis was not another woman, it was finding the country.

As for storage, the thing I have the hardest time with is fasteners of all types. Coffee cans and old plastic mayonaise and peanut butter containers are OK for a few things but what about electrical connectors, nuts, bolts, washers and screws of various sizes? And nails? The boxes they come in fall apart after a short while. My barn has a sand floor so anything that falls on my "floor" sinks in to the "tool abyss" to never be found. Except for old nails - they will be found when the RTV is put away.
 

·
Rockin In The Free World
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
For nuts, bolts, nails, and really any type of fastener or fitting - use nut 'n' bolt bins. Costco has some very nice ones, and you can get them at industrial auctions quite frequently. Some of the more convenient ones come as steel panels which you screw to the wall - the bins then hang on individual lips made into the panel. Bins come in many sizes, depths, widths, colours etc. etc. but all will hang on the same steel panel.

Another option is a "machine tool" cabinet - brand names like Lista come to mind, but there are many others. These are similar to your "big red" tool cabinets but they're designed with drawer dividers and lots of them - so basically, you can easily divide a drawer into many seperate containers. Some of these cabinets are extremely expensive, but you can pick them up at industrial auctions for about $0.10 on a dollar. I think I paid $250 Cdn for a $3000+ Lista cabinet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,567 Posts
My barn has a sand floor
it is not great but have you ever considered "soil cement" it is a method of solidifying the ground with cement

The normal is
to spread cement out on the ground one want to harden usually about 1" deep.
Then take a rototiller and mix it in about 3" to 4" deep deeper 6" to 8" if your wanting to drive on it, and then double the cement added to the mix.
Then take a roller and pack it down, or tamp it down smooth,
Then gently sprinkle it with some water,

It was used in forward bases in ww2, it is used to increase the base of many concrete pours,

If at at later day you want to put a fine finish on the floor, (if it was leveled and properly done, one then can put a layer of finish concrete over it of lesser than normal thickness.

do an Internet search, on SOIL CEMENT.

no you will not get a slab like finish floor, you will get a stabilized floor, the cleaner the sand or gravel it the stronger it will be, soils with a lot of clay or organic materials will not do as well as sands and gravels, that are reasonable clean,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
chuckhole said:
The post about plumbing supplies got me to thinking. What do you keep on hand in the shop? How do you organize it? What else can't I live without (chances are I already want it :dance: )

I would have a few pipe wrenches too.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,180 Posts
Another way to deal with a dirt/sand floor in a building is to find old carpeting, and use it on the floor. A friend did this in his machine shed with carpeting removed in complete pieces from commercial buildings, and had layers of it on the floor. Softened the surface, and if he spilled oil on it, just through that part away.

Back to the original subject: Years ago (maybe 15?) I decided to inventory my tools, and filled a 3x5 recipe box file full of cards of my rare, unusual, valuable, or collectible tools, and a spiral notebook of regular tools. (I collect certain kinds of old tools, and have hundreds of usable, "collectible" or "antique" tools.) I get behind with it on occassion and find tools I have purchased that aren't on my list. I think it is 2 or 3-70 page notebooks full now, and I can't imagine inventoring my supplies, such as pvc, copper, iron and galvanized plumbing, conduit, both galv and plastic, wood, plywood, etc. Nuts, bolts, and screws--I have trouble remembering what diameters I keep on hand, let alone the lengths and types. I also, like some others, will buy 20 pieces if I need 10, so I have some on hand for next time so I don't need to make a special trip. We get a lot of fasters at the local Fastenal--great for metric or stainless, but we usually have to buy a carton of 50 or 100 pieces, so then of course we have more stock on hand. I keep buying the $10 drawer cabinets at Fleet Farm when they are on sale, different size drawers depending on size and number of fasteners or tool parts I need to store, and the cabinets are usually the same outside dimensions so they are easy to add more along the wall.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,788 Posts
I would a gimlet or two to the list.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,963 Posts
I have two shops, a 40x40 and a 24x30. It would take forever to list all my tools. And that wouldn't include all the stuff in the barn. Even then, I'd miss something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Chuckhole,
The sales are used to dispose of property considered to be surplus to the needs of the industry,government,etc, ergo the name. Classifieds in local and regional papers will list them. Cabinets like these turn up at flea markets also.
There's even a space on the front of the drawer to list the contents :)

You could follow Ontarioman's suggestion, but they're kinda expensive purchased new or used.

What's good about the card files is that they are intended to hold cards, not nuts, bolts, etc. Most wouldn't consider an alternate use, that's why you can get them cheap. Have a large metal one with approximately 20 drawers.
Loaded, it probably weighs over 500lbs.

A suggestion for hardware, if I may. Watch for 5 gal buckets full at flea markets. Dig down and try to get ones that are mostly nuts & bolts. Sort them into your cabinet drawers. MUCH cheaper than the hardware :dance:

P.S. Never seen an RTV :angel: LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,863 Posts
chuckhole said:
....
I have never been to a surplus property auction. How do you find them? Until 3-1/2 years ago, I have lead a sheltered city life. I didn't even know that Tractor Supply existed until then. My midlife crisis was not another woman, it was finding the country.......
I live out close enough to the Washington State University campus which holds a surplus sale once a month WSU Surplus and I spect many colleges and universities have such as well.... I hate to look at the sales when i am broke or cant go cause sure enough there is gonna be something I could think of doing something with..... like last months 2 small trucks with boxes and electric endgate lifts, minimum was $2500 and shoot you can buy the boxes for that with the endgates let alone a 15 year old rig with less than 70,000 miles on them..... okokokokok there were other things too.

anyhow that is a place to start, and the government auctions are a place too, but you need to be dedicated to watching everyday for what is being offered and be able to go look at the lots if you even thin you want something.....

Idaho state has one big DOT auction every year, and they sell really nice used trucks and such a person can get almost as cheap as a car auction, but you dont have to be a licensed dealer to attend..... you might try going that way too.... or your county, city, police..... get on a list and they notify you.... but the internet is a pretty good place to start.

William
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
When it comes to storage I use plastic 1 quart and 5 quart empty oil containers. I cut the top off with my chop saw. Use a permanent marker or label maker to identify the contents. One shelf for the quart and another for 5 quart containers. I currently use this for nuts, bolts, washers, cotter pins, fuses, small auto lights bulbs, springs, the list goes on. Easy, neat, and FREE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,944 Posts
I like those buckets full of stuff....found some goodies in them.

I bought a bunch of bins and rails from Harbor freight and Fleet Farm for my bolts and such.I hate having to dump out a jar or whatever to find what I want. Easier to just reach in and grab.
Use cheap canning jar shelves with shallow boxes or bigger parts bins for bigger things.

As for tools..I have just enough to get into trouble. Usually have to run back into work and dig through my toolbox there to find the stuff to get out of it. I figure in another year or so all my work tools will be home and my home tools will be at work.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,788 Posts
I use clear plastic peanut butter jars for the different sized screws and nails.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
Another source for used/surplus items real cheap is DRMO (Defense Reutilization Management Office)- This is a centralized repository for ALL military surplus items. These items are first offered to other federal agencies who get to pick through the pile and whatever is left is sold at regular auctions. As an example- it's common to buy a pallet of 10-15 old computers for $15.00 (if someone had a need for that many old computers). Contact your nearest military base for the location. Some of the neatest items are used munition storage/shipping containers. I'm not talking about ammo boxes.....These look like various sized steamer trunks. Excellent for storage of power tools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,963 Posts
I was doin' the redneck thing last night in my shop, grilling meat and playing around with a couple small fixit projects, when I looked down, and in my right hand was the most important tool in my shop.

An ice-cold Bud Light.

There are many different brands of this cool tool, and a case of them is basic to any redneck shop. Since no one has yet listed this essential of shopsmanship, I thought I would. It ranks right up there with a required stock of bologna, white bread, mustard, mayonnaise, and pickled quail eggs in the redneck shop fridge.

The universal applications of these cool tools are amazing. Get a job well done, crack open a cool tool. Too hot in the shop, crack open a cool tool. Too cold in the shop, crack open a cool tool. Need to ponder something, crack open a cool tool. Oops, you just broke it, crack open a cool tool. Hit your finger, crack open a cool tool. Hiding from the wife, crack open a cool tool. Stripped the threads, crack open a cool tool. Ow, that's hot, crack open a cool tool. Grilling, crack open a cool tool. And when it's time to relax, crack open a cool tool. Etc.

And when you are done using them, these tools leave you with a nice pile of scrap aluminum you can cash in at the recycler! A neat item to have on hand.

By the way, the pork chops turned out delicious!
 

·
Born city, love country
Joined
·
438 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Jim,
You are the winner......hands down. I was so worried about proper storage for all kinds of tools and fasteners and completely forgot that my barn is lacking in quality and proper quantity of the most import tool and tool storage container of them all. Please allow me hang my head in shame and go stand in the corner......... :Bawling:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,963 Posts
LOL...just watch out about using those cool tools, chuckhole. They can be addicting!

:buds: :buds: :buds: :buds:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,963 Posts
Too many of these...


...can lead to this...


:p :1pig: :p :1pig:
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top