too old for band castration

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by hudsonm5, May 4, 2005.

  1. hudsonm5

    hudsonm5 Member

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    Hello “neighbors”,

    I’ve been lurking here a short while and this is my first post. So introductions all around … I’m just south of Chehalis, Washington, in a small town called Winlock.

    I have an 11 month old Hereford steer, well, half steer/half bull as somebody didn’t do a complete job first time around.

    Question is: is he too old to use a band castrator to complete to job?

    --Marc Hudson
     
  2. JanO

    JanO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi Marc... goodness we are going to be nieghbors of sorts, soon. I'm buying a place in Toledo that will close by the end of the month. :p In fact, we were origionally looking in Winlock. Nice to meet you. :)

    I don't know about band casteration per se'. At 11 months I don't think it would be advised, but to be sure I would call the vet and have him advise you. If it is, he'll probably do it for you while he's there. If not, he'll suggest an alternative. It'll all depend on exactly what, and how things got botched up last time. It might cost you a little more to have the vet do it, but if your keeping your steer/bull/? it could be woth it. If he's enroute to the freezer in the near future, don't worry about it and let the guy enjoy his days. JMHO
     

  3. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Well, depends on his temperment, and depends what you want to do. But there is a procedure that can be done to make that half nut useless, and I beleive they crush the vas-deferns. Not 100% sure, but i'll be doing the same procedure to a bull calf, once he gets the friskyness set in, @ 5months or so. Hopefully it renders me a heat detecting steer!


    Jeff
     
  4. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    H Mark,
    Two things. If somebody has already had a go at him he has probably lost the sac and you will find it very difficult to get a ring around the remaining testicle.
    Secondly, he is way too old to be putting a ring on even if he was entire. It is now a vets job unless you are prepared to leave him as a rig.

    Ideally, ringing a calf should be done within 3 months of birth and the sooner the better. The longer it is left, the more problems that can arise, not least of which it takes too long for the sac to drop off because of it's size, and infection sets in. And if you've ever seen what infection can do to an older calf's scrotum, you won't be tempted to do it twice.


    Jeff, your talking about emasculation. Not a nice procedure and personally I would be talking to my vet about teaser bulls and optional methods.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  5. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I would think that you would have a problem redoing something that some messed up before. To have it done correctly now, you'll likely need a vet. Under normal circumstances, you would have been able to use a calcitrate bander, which is quite a bit different than the little rings that people generally think of.
     
  6. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    If you had access to an Emasculatome, you could do it in a few minutes. You could borrow mine, but getting you hear to get it might be costly.
     
  7. vtfarma

    vtfarma Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure I may ruffle a few feathers but we use the callitrate bander and do it at 9 or 10 months (11 and 12 months is too old). The beef get a good jump on size and it is not hard to band with the big bander. We do it early in the season so flies are not a problem and we keep watch over them. We bring them through the chute and spray them down with BluKote. The ones we did that had turned a year were big boys anyway and we ended up with a sack that didn't drop and still had a blood vessel in it alive. He didn't get an infection, just alot of blood. We were lucky. Now we just are sure to get them around 9 or 10 months depending on size and attitude.

    Now as for coming in to a screw up - nope that is where the vet comes in and charges you 70 bucks to make you want to die. My husband watched the last time one of the older ones we had just bought was done and the vet just went snip and yank (to simplify) and dropped the goods on the barn floor. Ooh that could hurt! ;) Steer was fine, a little slow for a day or two and out of the barn in 48 hours.
     
  8. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    We brand, well...this weekend. Calves are about 4-5 months old. We cut them at that time. I have also cut many yearlings that we have used for roping purposes. Not a bad job so long as you know what you are doing. I much rather do it at this age though. Dont neccesarily care what it feels like to them when its done.
    I am certainly am not a proponent of banding though. Personal and professional reasons.
     
  9. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Infection depends on the season, and depends on how it's done. It's like anything, banding if done fast, and you don't double check to make sure it's a good band (got both balls), you could have trouble. But a vasectomy or whichever it is called is an option, talked to the vet about it and he is funny. He will not do anything that causes an animal great pain, dehorning he is carefull. Type of guy that will stop to find out how everyone is doing.



    Jeff
     
  10. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jeff,
    It sounds as though you have a really good vet and a careing guy to boot.
    Dehorning (of older animals), vasectomy etc. can all be done under local anaesthetic; a little more expensive but no pain to the animal.

    Rather than running a teaser bull, have you considered heat detectors. I have never used them as my operation is too small and I'm quite content to keep a bull and he seems to manage the job quite well. However, I have friend who runs a small Angus breeding stud and uses AI. Rather than keep a teaser bull for 12 months of the year eating his head off, she uses heat detectors and they seem to work very well. She had a pregnancy scan done on Thursday and of her 51 cows, 4 were empty. They were all insemminated using the heat detectors as a guide. Just a thought and I'm assuming that you will be using AI?

    Cheers,
    Ronnie