Too Much Manure

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by big rockpile, Dec 23, 2006.

  1. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Just seems such a problem anymore.I don't care if its Human or Animal.There was a write up in the Paper about a Sale Barn in a small town close to here.People were complaining about the smell and runoff.

    Then today while we was driving over to another town.Big Signs along the road complaining about Turkey Barns.

    Seems hear all about this anymore all the time.Seems we are doing a pretty good Job of messing everything up.Having more people.Having to have more animals to feed these people.And have to have everything concentrated in small areas to make matters worse.

    You might say I raise all my animals on a large area,so I don't have this problem.But might be coming from miles into your water supply or into the stream where you swim and fish.

    Oh just the thought is plum nasty! But once again I don't have an answer :shrug:

    big rockpile
     
  2. vallyfarm

    vallyfarm Well-Known Member

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    Not the problem. Years ago farmers only kept as many animals as their land could handle. The manure was used to fert. the hay fields and gardens. Now "farmers" slam 500 cows on less than an acre, call it a feedlot, and all is swell. This can not be maintained. Feed is trucked, or sometimes brought in by rail to feed these. The manure has no place to go, so causes problems. The guy growing the feed for all these animals has no manure for his fields, so he uses chemical fert. Now that causes another problem. The trucker now burns all sorts of fuel to transport the feed, when the cows used to just walk to the next pasture. Another problem. As we get mor "evolved" we seem to make easy thing into major problems. We solve them by making even bigger problems. Yea to us. Mike
     

  3. suzfromWi

    suzfromWi Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ill take some of that manure for my gardens...... :dance:
     
  4. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No, Suz, cause then someone would get e-coli from the lettuce you grew, from the manure you put on your garden!! i'm wondering why--when it was done for years--its such a no-no now?
    think its like in foreign countrys, you build up a immunity to what you handle every day--even if here its animal manure--not human?
     
  5. grannygardner

    grannygardner Well-Known Member

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    I couldn't have said it better. You hit the nail right on the head. My dad would have said that we're our own worst enemy.
     
  6. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Another point: The ecoli that was on the spinach was caused not by manure,but by a slaughtered or decaying animal that was in the field. Manure is naturally decomposed by microbes and bacteria and being exposed to the air. The ecoli in this animal was not. I think that is a biological difference.

    Of course manure has been used for generations. It makes sense and makes the food taste better. The French Intensive method was started by french farmers who grew lots of things close together under cloches. The way they got things to grow year round was--you guessed it-- manure. The manure when decomposing heated up the ground and therefore the cloches. You don't hear of thousands of French people dying of ecoli?

    The more people are removed from the farm, the less they understand about biology. Simple biology. Don't get me started on the use of "antibacterial" soaps!!
     
  7. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    last year, or was it the year before? lol--at my age easy to forget, there WAS a lettuce outbreak of e-coli caused by using cow manure on the beds. on another forum it was discussed about perhaps handling our own animals built up immunity to what we use. for me, dont guess i'll ever be removed from the farm, 'bout old enough to be "under "it.
    but i do understand what you mean, most people anymore think chickens come from the store.
     
  8. mama2littleman

    mama2littleman El Paso

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    This was really brought home to me yesterday as I was driving through New Mexico. The town of Vado has a huge dairy feedlot operation and you can smell the dairy 8 miles before you can see it, then for another 8 miles after you pass it. Further on up, near Hillsboro, there is some pretty extensive acreage with beef cattle grazing, not a fly nor an offensive odor to be found.

    If that doesn't bring the point home about feedlot operations, I don't know what would.

    Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't animal manure, i.e. cow manure, supposed to be composted for 1 year to kill off pathogens prior to use as a fertilizer on raw consumed crops?

    Nikki
     
  9. dcross

    dcross Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can use manure on the garden as long as it's done properly.

    The strain of ecoli that's so dangerous to humans has become much more prevalent due to the large amounts of grain fed to cattle these days.

    <<The ecoli that was on the spinach was caused not by manure,but by a slaughtered or decaying animal that was in the field.>>

    Last I heard they were blaming it on wild hogs going through the field. Either that or manure getting into a creek which flooded the field.
     
  10. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There is no problem with manure, but those with the huge feed lots just don't bother to take care of it. Manure can be composted very quickly if it is put into the right circumstances. The manure from these places could be composted and sold as a byproduct. But, maybe they couldn't be. Poultry are fed arsenic, so maybe their manure would not be saleable.
     
  11. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Manure from Turkey and Hog Barns goes right on the fields or into Lagoons.

    The Sale Barn on my first Post is right in the middle of town.the Lots are dirt.All the water runs into a Creek that runs into the river that runs by me.

    I keep thinking about the runoff coming from Springfield,that runs into James River,that runs into Table Rock Lake,that runs into Tanyecomo,that runs into the White river.Plus throw in all the Chicken Barns along the way.

    Living around these places after awhile you don't notice the smell.But it gets into your House,Clothes,your Hair.You can not leave without carrying the smell with you.You don't notice but everyone else does. :shrug:

    big rockpile