too late for potatoes?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by momlaffsalot, Apr 23, 2006.

  1. momlaffsalot

    momlaffsalot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,398
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2004
    Location:
    Kansas
    Is it to late to put in seed potatoes? I did not know they were a cool weather crop :shrug: Darn it.
     
  2. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,801
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Wisconsin
    Where did you get the idea that it was too late to plant potatoes in Kansas? Or, for that matter, that potatoes are a cold weather crop? Since potatoes are not able to withstand any frosts, they are definitely NOT a cold weather item. Depending upon the variety, one could probably still plant on the 4th of July in Kansas and get a decent crop.

    Martin
     

  3. momlaffsalot

    momlaffsalot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,398
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2004
    Location:
    Kansas
    Hmmm, I got it from a Jerry Baker book. He said that they are a cool weather crop and quit growing at around 80 degrees.
    Thanks for the help! I've got plantin' to do!
     
  4. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,801
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Wisconsin
    Kansas is Zones 5 and 6. Your normal early variety potato planting should have been any time this month. Late and long storage types would be planted from mid-May to mid-June.

    Were potatoes strictly a cool-weather crop, we wouldn't dare tell that to some parts of the country where a second crop of potatoes are planted in early July! I've even done it here by following Red Norlands with Yukon Golds. The Yukon Golds would just be at the peak of tuber production during the hottest part of August. Then, sufficient water is more important since the tender foliage is not very efficient when it comes to retaining moisture.

    In reality, few vegetables like temperatures over 80F. Few tomato varieties are able to set fruit when the temperature is above that as the pollen melts. But we certainly wouldn't consider tomatoes as a cool-weather crop. During hot spells, the plants do their growing and production during the cooler nights while just trying to stay alive during the day. Their cousins, potatoes, are the same way.

    Martin
     
  5. dogo

    dogo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    263
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2005
    I live in Alabama, just wondering where you could get some seed potato's ? I would like to put some red spuds in the ground . maybe two small rolls . Mr. Martin help me out here, got any idea ?
     
  6. Jennifer Brewer

    Jennifer Brewer Jennifer

    Messages:
    352
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2005
    i would also like to put some taters down this year. i'm zone 5b, and i've never planted potatoes before.

    i need simple instructions for idiots.
    how much space do potatoes take up?
     
  7. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,801
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Wisconsin
  8. dogo

    dogo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    263
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2005
    Thanks my friend, you are a gem !!! My onions are looking good that I got from you . What would be the best fertilizer for them and when should I put it to them ? I have never tried raising onions before ?..Thanks ........Dan
     
  9. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,801
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Wisconsin
    Potatoes and onions have only one thing in common and that is their fertilizer needs. Both do best when there is twice as much phosphorus as either nitrogen or potassium. Therefore, any 1-2-1 ratio fertilizer is what they need. Commercial 10-20-10 is the most common fertilizer recommended for onions and potatoes. A good organic equivalent would be decomposed oak leaves which are close to that ratio.

    Martin