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Discussion Starter #1
I'd really like to build a couple cold frames and try to grow lettuce, mustard greens, and maybe carrots in them over the winter. I have the windows and wood to make the boxes. I can scrounge up the dirt and can rig up good insulation. But is it too late in the year to try it? We're in southeastern Kentucky, and according to the nifty online zone finder, we're in 6b. I'm just afraid we won't be able to get good sunlight for germination and all that magical stuff that has to happen.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Very true. And at least it will be something I can mark off my to-do list for this winter. Okay, if it ever stops raining for five minutes, I'll do it. *fingers crossed*

Thanks, all!
 

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Build a couple and give it a try. I've been experimenting with one for a couple of years and seem to have finally gotten the planting schedule down. The basic idea is to get the plants growing before it gets too cold and the daylight short. The plants don't grow much in the cold, but you can keep harvesting them.

Might be too late to get anything much going now, but worst case scenario, the seeds will overwinter and start up in the spring a month earlier than they would without cover.

Eliot Coleman is a master of this. Here's a basic primer:

http://www.fourseasonfarm.com/pdfs/garden_for_all_seasons.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Build a couple and give it a try. I've been experimenting with one for a couple of years and seem to have finally gotten the planting schedule down. The basic idea is to get the plants growing before it gets too cold and the daylight short. The plants don't grow much in the cold, but you can keep harvesting them.

Might be too late to get anything much going now, but worst case scenario, the seeds will overwinter and start up in the spring a month earlier than they would without cover.

Eliot Coleman is a master of this. Here's a basic primer:

http://www.fourseasonfarm.com/pdfs/garden_for_all_seasons.pdf
Thank you!
 

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Edited to add: once things start warming up in the spring, you need to keep an eye on the temperature and prop up the window if it's going to get warm.

I keep an old thermometer in there, and if it's sunny and say, 70F, the themperature in the cold frame can climb over 100F. I cooked the lettuce once.

Live and learn.
 
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