Tongue-and-groove boards for ceiling??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by barbarake, Mar 16, 2004.

  1. barbarake

    barbarake Well-Known Member

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    I have some tongue-and-groove boards that my sister wants to use for her kitchen/living room ceiling. The boards are 3" wide, 3/4" thick. Her current ceiling is sheetrock with that 'popcorn' paint on it. It has cracks in it. She's tried to repair them but they keep coming back.

    Does anyone know if you can simply install these boards over the sheetrock or does the sheetrock need to come down first??

    Thanks.
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This may not be how Norm Abrams would do it, but I would leave the sheetrock. Find the ceiling joist and put in new drywall screws to hold the old sheetrock solidly to them. This also gives you a marker to fasten the boards to the joists.
     

  3. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    I would add wood strips 90 degrees to the existing ceiling joist, nail or screw them very tightly, place them on 16 inch centers. Nailing new t & g wood to a surface as 'spoungy' as drywall would be a craftmans nightmare. Leave the drywall in place as an insulation.
     
  4. Nette

    Nette Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I saw Ron Hazelton from "House Calls" remove a popcorn ceiling last week. It looked easy, but required a lot of prep work. Had to tape plastic along the edges of the ceiling and cover the floor of the preferably empty room. Then he used a garden sprayer to spray plain water on the ceiling and the popcorn stuff came right off with a putty knife. He probably made it look easy. Wonder if he has a web site? If so, it might be some more information about that project. Can't help you with the tongue-and-groove. But here's another question: What kind of paint would you use to paint the tongue-and-groove? I have some that I need to paint which hasn't been painted since probably the 60's. Would you use an eggshell finish or a semi-gloss on the top coat? I don't think flat would look right...
     
  5. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    All you have to do is spray the popcorn with water and it comes right off with a putty knife. You can't scrape too hard or you'll take the sheetrock paper off with it. It is extremely messy, but easier than installing the T&G, not that that's too hard, though.
     
  6. sdrew

    sdrew Well-Known Member

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    I agree with MOOPUPS,.... just install strapping over the existing sheetrock; then install the t&g boards to that. Quick and easy job.
     
  7. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

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    Ditto moopups, he's exactly right.

    An airnailer would be a wonderful thing to have....
     
  8. barbarake

    barbarake Well-Known Member

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    I have an air nailer so that's not a problem. Thanks for all the advice, I guess we'll just go right over the sheetrock.

    I'm not looking forward to it - I hate working on ceilings. Give me walls any day.
     
  9. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    It seems to be fairly labor intensive, but the finished product will be worth the effort. I've seen it in many !00yr+ old houses, & it seems to have held up real well.
     
  10. retire2$

    retire2$ Well-Known Member

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    Do you have rafters or trusses? If you have trusses you may want to consider the extra weight. When I built my houses I was informed by the truss manufacturer that there was a maximum wt. limit that could be placed on the bottom chord of the truss. I don't know the maximum wt. because when I informed the truss manufacturer that I was planning on using 1/2" drywall he said that would be OK.
     
  11. Janon

    Janon 993cc Geo Metro

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    Drill a 1/2 or 3/4 inch hole at each end of the ceiling crack, then fill the crack and the holes with caulking, then repaint the popcorn ceiling. Ok, I admit that this is the lazy man's way.

    cheers,
     
  12. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have beadboard ceilings in our 100+year old farmhouse and they are very attractive...we put ours over the old cracked wood ceilings with a nail gun. Alot more character than drywall...but alot of overhead painting later!!! DEE