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Of coarse now days not too manny people know what that means since there too busy with Black Friday.

When I was a kid growing up around these parts of Oklahoma the day after Thanksgiving was considered Hog day. All my Uncles who lived close by would get up early in the morning and kill their pig(s) they have been fattening up since the late spring/early summer months. Then they would bring them down to granny's house who lived next to a spring fed creek. Here at the creek they would build a big fire and get the kettles a heat'n. Fill them big cast iron kettles full of water and get them up to almost boiling. Then they would start in scraping the hair off the hogs they brought down. They would spend all day scraping and cutting up the hogs. At sometime in the afternoon they would empty those big black kettles of the water and then start loading them up with pig skins and fat and start cooking them down. Rendering the lard out. Start salting down peices and hanging them up in the old smoke house.

Then this is where I would start having fun. "Crackling" I'd start eating those things and wouldn't know when to stop. I can still hear my mom telling me to quit eating them or I'm gonna make myself sick. By the time she'd get me pulled away I'd have the greasiest chin ever.:D

I miss those good ole days. No one does that anymore that I know of.
 

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Slaughter hogs and render lard? If you lived closer I'd invite you over and hand you a scraper. I'd even let you have your fill of cracklins and cold beer to wash em down.
 

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You sound like you might be from North Carolina. How well I remember "Hog Day". Seems it was colder back then on hog day.
From Oklahoma, but that's purty close. I guess it was colder back then. Seems like thanksgiving week would be when we would get our first major cold northern and seemed it would stay cold for the next 3 months. We've been hittin in the low 60's for several days. About 10 to 12 degrees above normal for this time of the year. Wouldn't be good for curing meat right now. But it's suppose to drop down in the upper 40's for a few days this weekend.

Outlaw9, the last time I scraped a hog I used the kitchen butcher knife. It worked good enough. But the last couple of piggies that I've raised I sent to the processer in town. Let them do the work for me.
 

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We have hairy feral pigs so we skin them instead of scraping them. If we get an unbred sow she will have nice soft fur instead of the usual bristly black hairy hide. It is much faster to process pigs when they are peeled instead of scraped, IMHO. We still brine, smoke, make sausage & bacon, render the fat and the rest of it, just not the scraping and getting those wretched black hairs everywhere.

Anyone tried using a blow torch instead of scraping?
 

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we used to burn the hair on small butcher calves, but never tried it on any else, since grandpa sold the farm and all kettles and the press, we too now just skin, verses scrapping.
 

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I was just reading about this topic in 1st series of Foxfire books. That generation sure was self reliant. Trades that are all but lost to the kids today.

Had a friend tell me a story about a group of city kids that came out to visit his farm to watch the cows get milked. One of the girls actually told him, "If I knew that was where milk came from I would've never drank it"

GR
 

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Today is our first hog day. This is our first pig we've ever raised and we want to do the butchering our selves. We are going to render lard also but we are going to skin her instead of scalding her. This will be an annual tradition for us. I am excited about it.
 

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Today is our first hog day. This is our first pig we've ever raised and we want to do the butchering our selves. We are going to render lard also but we are going to skin her instead of scalding her. This will be an annual tradition for us. I am excited about it.
How long did you raise it to get to slaughter weight?
 

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Of coarse now days not too manny people know what that means since there too busy with Black Friday.

When I was a kid growing up around these parts of Oklahoma the day after Thanksgiving was considered Hog day. All my Uncles who lived close by would get up early in the morning and kill their pig(s) they have been fattening up since the late spring/early summer months. Then they would bring them down to granny's house who lived next to a spring fed creek. Here at the creek they would build a big fire and get the kettles a heat'n. Fill them big cast iron kettles full of water and get them up to almost boiling. Then they would start in scraping the hair off the hogs they brought down. They would spend all day scraping and cutting up the hogs. At sometime in the afternoon they would empty those big black kettles of the water and then start loading them up with pig skins and fat and start cooking them down. Rendering the lard out. Start salting down peices and hanging them up in the old smoke house.

Then this is where I would start having fun. "Crackling" I'd start eating those things and wouldn't know when to stop. I can still hear my mom telling me to quit eating them or I'm gonna make myself sick. By the time she'd get me pulled away I'd have the greasiest chin ever.:D

I miss those good ole days. No one does that anymore that I know of.

What part of Okie are you from? My father was born in Muskogee and raised in the little town of (what used to be) Picher. He talks about doing that too. Here, my next door neighbor did this until recently. He needs his leg fixed he told me before he starts up again. But he has his little butcher shop all set up and ready to go. He also likes to make apple butter at this time of year.
 

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I remember those days too. My aunt and uncle always had a few hogs to butcher and my mom and I would go over. Of course I was very young, so they would not let me outside. I had to stay inside nice and warm. I still remember it though. Does seem as if it was colder back then too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
What part of Okie are you from? My father was born in Muskogee and raised in the little town of (what used to be) Picher. He talks about doing that too. Here, my next door neighbor did this until recently. He needs his leg fixed he told me before he starts up again. But he has his little butcher shop all set up and ready to go. He also likes to make apple butter at this time of year.
I live in southern Delaware county right about half way in between Muskogee and Picher.

Now days most people dont use the lard so therefore they don't need to scrape or burn the hair off the hog. But back in the old days they would scrape the skins before gutting or cutting up the hog. They done this so they could render the lard out of the skin and use the lard for stuff like soap making, cooking, or canning meat.

Congradulations to those of you who are going to be butchering your first pig.
 
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