Tomato shinanigans!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by deerlarkin, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. deerlarkin

    deerlarkin Member

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    Location:
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
    I have made a huge mistake! I have planted my tomato seeds in terra cotta pots. They are not big pots. What I am wondering is, how fragile are the little buggers (I use the term loosely - have never had any luck with tomatoes)?
    Can I transfer them to larger pots without killing them?

    Can anyone tell me there success story with tomatoes? I am truly frustrated :grump: year after year. I feed them when I should and water when necessary. They fall off or get picked off the bush and have big rotten spot(s) on the bottom.

    I am trying so hard to become self sufficient and have slammed against many walls on my way. However, if I can learn from you (the best of the best) my journey may be made a little smoother :)

    Thank you to all who read this thread regardless if you answer or not.

    Blessings,

    Deerlarkin
     
  2. Kellkell

    Kellkell Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    They should transplant okay, but the bigger problem sounds like blossom end rot. It is caused by inconsistent soil moisture. You might want to try mulching. If you are container gardening, the pots dry out much more frequently.
     

  3. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    you can plant them in 5 gallon buckets, one plant per bucket. if you think you might overwater, punch holes in the bottom of the buckets for drainage. keep in a place where they will get full sun. tomatoes like heat.
     
  4. BertaBurtonLake

    BertaBurtonLake Well-Known Member

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    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Virginia
    yes, you can transplant them. Tomatoes are not all that fragile at all. When you replant them plant them all the way up to the bottom set of leaves, stem and all. They will send out new roots all along the planted stem.

    Also add about a tablespoon of ag lime to the hole when you transplant them. The black spots on the bottom you describe sounds like blossom end rot and we have had good luck deterring this with lime.

    Good luck and I hope you get a bumper crop of 'maters this year!

    PS. Tomatoes like water but do not like to stand around in it.

    ~Berta
     
  5. MaineFarmMom

    MaineFarmMom Columnist, Feature Writer

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