Tomato Confusion

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Ivy DragonWind, Jan 21, 2007.

  1. Ivy DragonWind

    Ivy DragonWind Well-Known Member

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    Okay, I have grown tomatoes before with minimal success. I had six plants that all lived and produced, but I got only a handful of fruit. They were scattered varieties, some Roma, some Beefsteak, some Celebrity. Im looking into this again after taking a yr off, and I find myself overwhelmed.

    My plan is to have enough plants of the right varieites to can up salsa, chili, and tomato sauce. I would only need enough to do one or two batches of each, but that requires more fruit than I got last time.

    I have enough space for 12 plants. Which kinds would do the best in Nebraska for my purposes?

    TIA!

    Ivy
     
  2. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    Mortgage Lifter has a good reputation. however, i've noticed in my garden that success rates of different types vary by year. maybe the difference in weather year to year?
     

  3. circlevranch

    circlevranch Well-Known Member

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    I have good luck with the Heartland Variety they always produce a nice tomato and plenty of them too. The Amish Paste or Viva Italia are both good salsa and pasta sauce makers.
     
  4. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    6 plants producing a handful of plants don't sound like a variety problem. Sounds more like 6 plants growing in soil containing enough nutrients to produce only a handful of fruit. Nothing wrong with the varieties you grew and you probably wouldn't get much more from other varieties under the same conditions. Work on improving the conditions by adding compost, manure, fertilizer, etc. to the soil. Anything that will enrichen will be a great help. If you've got a problem with too much shade, then you need either a chainsaw or different garden location.

    Martin
     
  5. Ivy DragonWind

    Ivy DragonWind Well-Known Member

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    LOL!! Soil I can believe. The house in general was crap, including the gardens. We have moved since then, and I have to cut all new beds. I have much better sun now, too. I had to abandon my compost pile in the move :( but I am hunting down some.

    Oh, and by a handful, I mean I never got a good harvest in general. I had maybe two or three ripe fruit at a time, never enough to DO anything with. Hard to make sauce with two maters and a two week wait for your next ones... I would rather plant too many and have a glut this yr then not have enough to do anything and have to supplement with commercial clones. That kind of kills the point...

    Thanks, Martin!
     
  6. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Compost your soil, and make sure they are in a very sunny spot. Mulch them with organic material. They ought to produce well for you. Tomatoes aren't that picky really.
     
  7. Jim@concordfarm

    Jim@concordfarm Well-Known Member

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    As others have said, I think your soil is the problem. Last year I had 9 tomato plants, and got three 5 gallons buckets full every Saturday in August and part of September. They finally just were worn out by mid Sept. with still a month to go until frost. I'm in central IN. Brandywine, Supersteak, Rutgers, Big Boy, and Big Beef.
     
  8. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    If you've got crappy soil overall, and a large area involved, don't try to change the whole garden when 5 gallons will be enough for each tomato plant. Get some cow or horse manure, any age. Should be able to find that stuff in Nebraska without too much trouble. For 12 plants, you'd only need 30 gallons. As soon as you can work outside, mix that up 50/50 with 30 gallons of the best dirt that you can scrounge and let it set until planting time. Then, dig a 5-gallon hole for each tomato and spread that dirt elsewhere. Fill the hole with your mix and plant your seedling. That's the method used in the community gardens the past two years with horse manure.

    Martin
     
  9. Ivy DragonWind

    Ivy DragonWind Well-Known Member

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    Just made friends with the horse owners down the road... Gettin a big ol' tub of manure as a moving in gift when things thaw!
     
  10. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    You're halfway home already! I've got roughly 300 gallons of horse manure, compost, and rotted pondweed combined and waiting to be mixed with dirt. It will figure out to be less than 20% horse manure when done but I'm not dealing with real poor soil. If you use it 50/50, you WILL have tomatoes!

    Martin