Tomato blossom end rot

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by boonieman, Aug 22, 2006.

  1. boonieman

    boonieman Well-Known Member

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    I had blossom end rot bad the two previous years and this year none, zilch, nada. One thing was that we had intermittent rain fairly steadily this year without any long dry spells. The other thing I tried this year was to put baking soda around all the plants when they were young. Just wondering if I just got luck this year or if anybody else was experiencing blossom end rot. North central Ky here.
     
  2. dpayne2

    dpayne2 Member

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    Probably just lucky. I had the same problem last two years. but good this year also. I did add calcium to the soil this spring for insurance.
     

  3. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    The only tomatoes on which I had BER this year were the Green Zebras. They seem a little bit finicky, but WOW! do they pack a taste! Yummy! I'll be planting them again next year.

    The rest of the tomatoes are doing very well this season. I attribute much of that to the fact that the drought broke back in May, and I have made sure that the beds are consistently watered. Nothing fancy added to the soil, just good old compost and bunny poo.

    Pony!
     
  4. Argent Farms

    Argent Farms Pig farmer

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    Funny, I had the same thing here. No BER at all except on the Green Zebras. And it seems to only have been on the first fruit set, second set looks a lot better. I agree on the taste too, those are good tomaters!
     
  5. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    Now that you mention it, that's how it happened here, too. The first ones had BER something fierce (didn't stop me from cutting it off and eating the rest of the fruit!) Now, things are much nicer, and the fruit is actually bigger than earlier in the season.

    Mmmm... Got a load of 'maters in the dehydrator, put some up in jars yesterday, and if I'd get my buns pushed away from this darned computer contraption, I could get a lot more tomato done today!

    Pony!
     
  6. dennisjp

    dennisjp dennisjp

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    My husband wants to take cuttings from our tomato plants that are dying and try to replant them. Could anybody tell us how to root them because we want to try and have a late crop of tomatoes. He said it is way too late to plant seeds and we can't buy and plants. I would really appreciate any help that anyone could give us.


    stephanie
     
  7. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    You could stick them in wet sand. That's usually a very good medium for rooting cuttings.

    You could use some root tone, or else wet the sand with tea you make from willow bark (works the same as root tone, but doesn't cost anything).

    Good luck!

    Pony!
     
  8. dennisjp

    dennisjp dennisjp

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    Thank you pony. My DW said she had posted because I had asked about what she thought about getting the cuttings.
    I'll get some sand tomarrow and try it.
    I covered some plants with plastic a couple of years ago for the guy I was working for and he was getting tomatoes up until I know Jan. and I believe it was the end of Feb or the beginning of March before he stopped getting any more. All he grew was tomatoes but I am going to try everything except for the corn.
    I just planted some more beens and have another pepper plant ready to go out. Wish I had more but :shrug: Not sure whether it is a bell or a hot one, but it's going out regaurdless, lol.
    I am going to try to cover everything up that still looks good and see what it will do and I have been getting tomatoes from my second set of plants and the third row is looking good, but I don't know how long they will last so I would like to get some more in the ground.
    Has anyone ever done this and had good results???????
    Just trying to figure out what you can do and if the cuttings work, maybe I can get a few more jars canned. The Good Lord has been good to me this year with the small area I have planted.
     
  9. boonieman

    boonieman Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the responses. Sounds like it was just a good year. So much for my idea of buying stock in Arm & Hammer baking soda. :cool:
     
  10. IowaLez

    IowaLez Glowing in The Sun Supporter

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    An easy and cheap way to avoid BER is to incorporate crushed oyster shell (made for feeding to laying hens) into the soil before planting in the Spring, and topping off again later in the season. Some tomato varieties are very prone to BER and need extra care to avoid it.
     
  11. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    BER does not always mean there is a shortage of calcium in the soil, it is simply a condition where the plant is unable to absorb it through the roots and pass it on upward to the fruit. It is usually only in early fruit since the defined mineral-seeking roots weren't sufficiently developed when that fruit was forming. That can happen even if the plants are growing in a limestone quarry. It simply happens to many varieties no matter what the gardener does to prevent it. Just like mumps, measles, and chicken pox for people, the plants recover and don't get it again.

    There are various "cures" of which none work. All leave the gardeners with the good feeling that they did something. And when the BER goes away, they are even happier even though they had little or nothing to do with it! One can use every "de-BER" cure that there is on the market and it will go away. One can also use nothing and it will still go away.

    Preventions are many and some are detrimental. Epsom salts have been claimed to help. All well and good as long as the soil is also low on magnesium. If not, one is trading a lesser vegetative problem for a potential greater soil problem. Agricultural limestone or limestone powder would increase the availability of calcium but also not be appreciated in already alkaline soils. Antacid tablets are a calcium source which is readily available if it were where the plant's roots could find it. Oyster shells should be effective due to their makeup but chickens can not use all the calcium that is there and chicken manure is not a BER defense. Egg shells also should be effective and yet egg shells dissolved to an entirely liquid form will not guarantee no BER. Bone meal should prevent it but is no guarantee.

    In short, consider it like a minor childhood ailment where the child gets over it and just needs to be made comfortable while it's ill. It will happen to the best. Never a single fruit on Paquebot Roma with BER until this year and it indeed was but a single fruit on a single plant.

    Martin