Tomate Varieties

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by caroline00, Nov 26, 2005.

  1. caroline00

    caroline00 Well-Known Member

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    a friend gave me a bushel of tomatoes that she said was *Mountain something* she couldnt remember the other word. They were medium sized, uniform shaped, thin skinned with a small core. They were a delight to work with while canning... and taste fine too.

    Does anyone know what variety these were? Thank you!
     
  2. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No idea, but if you're interested in trading some seeds, it sounds like something I'd like to try. :D

    Pony!
     

  3. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like it could be Mountain Princess. Supposedly grown for generations in parts of West Virginia. Not very common otherwise and probably no longer available commercially.

    Martin
     
  4. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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  5. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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  6. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    WHOA!!! That's a lot of tomatoes!!!

    Oh, I can't wait for Spring!!!

    I think I may just order a couple packets early... Even though I have enough seed for the next two years, it's so hard to resist...

    Pony!
     
  7. caroline00

    caroline00 Well-Known Member

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    ok! Thanks!
    she was wondering if it was Mountain Fresh...but she wasnt sure about the fresh part.

    She said that they had another one called Mountain (she thought it was) Spring that was ripe with the early girl.

    So I am thinking that we want Mountain Fresh(mostly) and Mountain Spring(a few).
     
  8. caroline00

    caroline00 Well-Known Member

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    :shrug: they are hybrids???? now, I am wondering if I really want them... they sure were easy to work with...
     
  9. Randy Rooster

    Randy Rooster Well-Known Member Supporter

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    NC State University has developed a number of the "mountain" series -MT Spring, Mt Fresh, Mt Belle and a number of others- check intb them to find what they were.
     
  10. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    Some were hybrids, but not all. But since you said they were a delight to work with, I thought it would be pretty funny if they turned out to be Mountain Delights. :D
     
  11. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Don't be too quick to knock hybrid tomatoes. By definition, 95% of all named varieties were hybrids at one time. (The other 5% are mutations of that original 95%.) Hybrids are simply the results of crossing two varieties and that's exactly how new varieties are developed. If one were to grow them out and select for certain qualities, F1 through about F5 or F6 are usually thought of as being unstable. By F7, one usually has a stable variety.

    Martin
     
  12. caroline00

    caroline00 Well-Known Member

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    but you cannot successfully save seeds, right?
     
  13. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    Yes, you can. Hybrids will make seeds most of the time. The seeds can be saved and will grow. The problem is that they don't usually come true to seed. If you really love a hybrid variety and want to stabilize it (i.e., turn it into an open pollinated variety), what you have to do is grow out a generation of seedlings. Cull out all the weedy or wild looking seedlings. Of the ones that are strong and robust, wait until they bear fruit. There will be a lot of variation. Choose the very best of the best plants to save seeds from, the ones that are the closest to the parent variety not only in fruit, but also time of bearing, plant habit, and so on.

    If the plants are cross pollinating types (tomatoes are less inclined towards this, whereas squash cross pollinate like mad), then you will have to be very diligent about not allowing the poorer plants to pollinate the ones that are better quality, because that will ruin all your work.

    Repeat this every year for a number of years until the results are consistent with what you want and the plants and fruit are similar enough to be much more alike than different.

    Most of our open pollinated varieties came about this way. Then the plant breeders got lazy and greedy, and now they don't bother to stabilize the varieties any more.
     
  14. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    That is an excellent explanation by Chamoisee and especially how it applies to tomatoes. There are some hybrids which will produce F2 fruit very much like the F1 since both parents may have similar qualities. For example, one can plant Santa F2 and be about 95% certain that the fruit will be the same as the original. There is a lot of the original Juliet in the background of that one. The odd 5% seems to be a blocky "square" fruit rather than round. By contrast, almost every hobby grower has given up trying to get anything good out of Sungold F1. You may get yellow, gold, or red fruit of various sizes and shapes. Sometimes a mix on the same plant! One also may get a short determinate plant or a sprawling monster. Nobody has yet reported getting fruit the same as the original.

    Martin
     
  15. cpeyus

    cpeyus Well-Known Member

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    Excellent info here!