Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,681 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am considering acquiring a pair of mini donkey brothers. They are well handled but mainly pets/pasture ornaments. I was wondering how likely minis (either horses or donkeys) are to founder? The mini horses I have seen are often very fat, and founder is a concern since I would like to turn the donkeys out with my old horse...not keep them on bare lot. Does anyone have experience with minis?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
647 Posts
Morning Trail! I have one mini donkey and three mini horses. One of the mini horses came in as a chronic founder. They get fat super easy......I have to dry lot mine when the grass is green in the main field. After the grass is all dried up and has been grazed over by the neighbors cows followed by my sheep and goats, I let them out during the day but bring them into their small (bare lot) area at night. They still get fat (especially the donk) on nasty looking scrubby sun bleached field grass. My personal experience is that if you don't carefully watch their carbs, you will have problems. Really fun, personable pets though :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
I have 5 little donkeys. I am careful about giving them any grain type feed, though they love getting nibbles of it when I pull my horses in morning and night to feed. They stay fed well on prairie grass, but it doesn't make them overweight thankfully. Mine are very easy keepers, but I do watch for any hoof issues. So far I have had them for 5 years without any problems at all with founder. I do love my little guys, they are so super sweet! The donkey in the picture is a large standard, not a mammoth, even though he is large for a standard:) he loves my little 6 year old (small) grand daughter:)
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,279 Posts
Mini donkeys, once grown, require no grain or alfalfa hay; access to lush pasture can be a real problem though as they will eat 24/7.

If you get them, make sure you have a place to dry lot them, at least half the time. Also make sure they have been well handled, can be lead, stand for their feet being trimmed (about every 10 weeks or so), are up to date on their vaccinations and deworming.

Mini donkeys are absolutely wonderful, but you can't just leave them turned out with no care.

You mention the two you are considering are brothers; I hope they have been gelded. You will regret it if you get jacks; they are breeding animals and can be quite unpredictable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,332 Posts
I have mini horses. They absolutely have to be kept on a dry lot for the majority of the time. An hour or two out doesn't seem to hurt them but I never push it beyond that.
 

·
Goshen Farm
Joined
·
7,272 Posts
Ok, I know this is a dumb question but I gotta ask. If you do not let your animals graze in the field what the heck do they eat? How did they survive in years past when folks could not run to the feed store? sis
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Ok, I know this is a dumb question but I gotta ask. If you do not let your animals graze in the field what the heck do they eat? How did they survive in years past when folks could not run to the feed store? sis
Baled hay. My mini horse gets a flake of Bermuda a day and is more than well fed on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I have a Mediterranean donkey. Not quite mini/ not quite standard. We got him at 12 weeks old 5 years ago. The one thing we learned was he doesn't need much care. He is pretty self sufficient other than twice yearly farrier visits and vet checks. As for food, I give him a SMALL handful of oats twice a day, basically as a treat. Some hay (a flake) once a day since my pasture is gone. Otherwise there is not much else you need to do. Be advised that you had best have them gelded otherwise the hormones kick in and a jack can be trouble. At one year our guy started feeling his Wheaties and became quite a problem. After he was gelded he was his lovable, spoiled self again.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top