To Stump Grind or Not To Stump Grind

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Bubba Can Dance, Nov 13, 2006.

  1. Bubba Can Dance

    Bubba Can Dance Well-Known Member

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    We have had several trees cut that were close to our house. They were a general mixture of pine, oak, wild cherry, sweetgum and poplar. I have seen where a stumpgrinder had been used, but have never seen one in operation so I don't have a clue as to how hard they are to operate. Would you recommend renting a stumpgrinder or hiring some one to do the job? If it is very strenious, due to my health, most of the work will have to be done by my wife and daughter. All suggestions will be appreciated.
     
  2. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Keep the dogs leash away.
     

  3. morrowsmowers

    morrowsmowers Well-Known Member

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    I have never operated a stump grinder myself but I have seen women use them. We cut down a number of trees around our home over the past seven years and in each case either cut them off flush to the ground if they were of the smaller variety or left the stump in the bigger variety. We just removed the last remaining stump last month -- it was about 5 feet high and 2 feet thick -- my twins (age 12) used a sawzall with a foot long demolition blade to cut it off smooth to ground level -- took all four of the boys to carry that stump out front for the township to collect -- even though it was half way rotten. As with any power tool make sure you operate it with great caution.

    Ken in Glassboro, NJ :nono:
     
  4. farmergirl

    farmergirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Why grind stumps? I have an old stump left from the plum tree that finally succumbed to the peach tree borer infestation. I've thought of chopping it off at ground level with a chainsaw, like we cut up the rest of the dead branches. The stump is about 2 1/2 ft tall and is just acting as rustic decoration at this point. What is the purpose of stump grinding?
     
  5. RedTartan

    RedTartan Icelandic Sheep Supporter

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    Farmergirl,

    Stump grinding lowers the stump to below ground level. Then you can fill the whole and plant grass or whatever.

    In most cases I'd just leave the stump; however, I have a dying maple right smack in front of my house that I'm going to cut down and grind so I can have a nice front yard :)

    RedTartan
     
  6. omnicat

    omnicat Well-Known Member

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    The only reason I know that people grind stumps is when they have a strong emotional need to (or space limitations requiring) plant a new tree in the same spot. You absolutely want to grind a stump out reeeeeally well in that case. The stump and roots, as they decay, will release a chemical that inhibits new root growth in any tree planted at the same spot.

    Stumps can be picturesque!! Unless there's a reason to remove it, I'd leave it.

    (but then, I'm a lazy gardner, and will always vote to plant somthing 10 feet to the left rather than keep the original plan, and sweat for hours and hours to make it work)
     
  7. via media

    via media Tub-thumper

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    Stumps are termite magnets. I'd remove the stumps just for that reason alone.

    /VM
     
  8. omnicat

    omnicat Well-Known Member

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    Stumps are termite magnets

    LOL. That's a good reason. Though they can't eat MY house (cinderblock/stucco).
     
  9. charles burns

    charles burns Well-Known Member

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    I've ground a stump or two. A heavy grinder generally speaking will beat you up some. They're heavy and you need to wrastle them around a little. Shake your arms off. If you're not up to relatively heavy physical stuff get someone to do it.

    If you're going to plant trees in the ground out stump hole tell the grinder guy because he'll need to grind deep as possible, which may not be very deep depending on the model grinder. If you don't mention it he'll probably grind it two inches below the soil level.

    I would personally cut it flush at ground level with a chainsaw then put three or four inch deep criss cross cuts down into the face of the flush stump then chip the chunks out with an adze or mattock/axe type thing. You have to dig out around the stump three or four inches to do the plunge cut and chip thing. If you want to go deeper, dig down around the stump some more, cut and chip some more.

    The stump grinder and the chainsaw are pretty lethal implements in the hands of the inexperienced (excuse me, you may all be state champion chainsaw medalists for all I know). Given the restrictions governed by health and the possible inexperience of your daughter and wife I would forego all the headaches and risk and choose paying someone to do it if it was an option. You could pay someone to do one and watch - see if you could swing the rest.
     
  10. SmartAZ

    SmartAZ Well-Known Member

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    Get a bag of Stump Remover (potassium nitrate). Rough the stump with a chain saw and fill the scratches with the powder. It will be gone within a year.

    Another easy way is to cut both ends from a steel drum and put it over the stump, then build a fire in it.
     
  11. Aintlifegrand

    Aintlifegrand Well-Known Member

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    I just had 60 stumps removed ( average 12-14") and they cost 7.50 each to remove ( less than 500.00).. I could have rented the grinder for 180.00 a day and it probably taken me two to three days to grind them all which would have been the same amount of money. It made sense to me to have someone else do it and then I could be doing soemthing else...The machine he brought out was huge and no way could I have handled it. He was done in a half a day.
     
  12. Bubba Can Dance

    Bubba Can Dance Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all your suggestions and comments. We have decided one thing for sure, Country Lady and our daughter will not be using a grinder. :)
     
  13. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    Makes a lot of sence to me as long as they had to go!
     
  14. Aintlifegrand

    Aintlifegrand Well-Known Member

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    Yes. they had to go they were in the front yard . I still have a hundred or so in the back of the property, but I will wait until later for those.
     
  15. Sparticle

    Sparticle Well-Known Member Supporter

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    How about this?

    http://www.fungi.com/plugs/mso.html

    "We offer unique blends of spored oils, one for decomposing stumps of conifers and one for hardwoods. These oils are designed as environmentally friendly, biodegradable lubricants for chain-saws and other wood cutting tools (dilute 1:10 with canola oil for best results). As the wood is being cut, the spore-mass infused oil disperses mushroom spores into the cut faces of wood, and upon germination of spores accelerate the decomposition of stumps and brush. Stamets says, "Here is an alternative for reducing fuel load in the forest to prevent forest fires—don't rob the carbon bank by removing litter—saprophytize with gourmet and medicinal fungi!"