to put down a dog or not?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by buck_1one, May 11, 2006.

  1. buck_1one

    buck_1one Well-Known Member

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    I'm having a small problem. I have a black lab mix who seems to becoming too agressive. I'm am out of state at my mothers for a death in the family. Yesterday he had my aunt backed against the wall barking at her untill I came and made him go lay down. Today he was in his cage and went nuts at my mother. Showing his teeth and barking like a nut. Later tonight he would not let my aunt down the stairs. I went to get him, smacked his butt and he growled at me. I really busted his A double S and put him in the cage. He has done something like this before but he has never done anything like this at home. I don't know if it is a problem with him being away from home or what. At home it's just me and the dogs. I don't have much of any company stop by so this problem has never come up at home, just when we are away. I think if I would have been home and this happened he would be dead right now, but I don't have my gun and this ain't the country. I'm soo upset right now I could spit nails. I have a feeling I'm going to have to put him down at some point. I don't know what is up his butt. Anyone ever have a dog do anything like this before? I thought that maybe he just got scared, but a couple times I was very close when it happened and he should not have felt scared.

    I don't know what to do....any help???

    Buck
     
  2. froggirl

    froggirl Feelin' Froggy

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    Hi,
    Sorry you're having dog problems. My first reaction when I read your post was to put a muzzle on him and get him to the vets for a check up. Some dogs get more mean than others when they don't feel well. Other thought was, if you're living by yourself and don't get much company, was he ever really socialized in the first place? That makes such a difference. How old is he?
    --f.g.
     

  3. crystalniche

    crystalniche Well-Known Member

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    You are not at home, everyone is stressed, he is in a cage, likely feels cornered and he is not used to strangers. He is doing what he thinks that he is supposed to do~protect himself. It sounds like he is mixed up in what he is expected to do. If he were mine I would take him to training classes and socialize him a lot. Take him away from home and really work on the problem. If you can't take the time to properly socialize and train your dog how is he supposed to know the right way to act? How is he at other times? Does he believe that it is his job to protect you and your home? When you have a dog it means socialization as well as housetraining.
     
  4. buck_1one

    buck_1one Well-Known Member

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    I'm not real sure of his exact age but he's around 2 years old. For the most part I've never had a problem at home. Once I've let someone in he's been fine. He might growl and bark at someone untill I've come out but nothing like this, again at home. I don't leave like this very often so I know he's out of his place but I've never had a dog do anything like this.

    Buck
     
  5. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'd pay a visit to the vet. If he's "never" acted like this before and it's completely out of character, he may be sick. Rabies could be a possibility.
     
  6. KindredSpirit

    KindredSpirit Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Crystalniche, I think he is out of his home environment and now around other people, both of which are new to him. He is probably scared, even though you are there. It is like when you are at the vet with your dog, they know you are there with them, but still they are scared. I would try to get him through this visit and then get him home and socialize him like Crystalniche said. If he is two years old he will learn quickly. I would give him that chance, he is a young dog and doesn't deserve to die. You have already said he can be a good dog.
     
  7. froggirl

    froggirl Feelin' Froggy

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    Hey Buck
    My next questions would be: have you ever traveled with him like you are now? Is he used to his crate? He could just be on overload with all the new stimulation. Perhaps there is a quiet room where you can put him and also check in on him frequently until he can chill out a bit(?) Is he neutered?

    From 1 years to 4 years, dogs seem to go thru a new period of agression.....basically they seem to be testing their wings as the come into maturity. Maybe it's a combination of 1. lack of socialation, 2. new experience and surroundings 3. hormones. Does that sound like what he's going thru?
    --f.g.
     
  8. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    it is coming up on a full moon, which effects many animals..... and some people are more inclined to be lunatics as well.... dogs sense people out of sorts and such way more than a person thinks.....

    I personally would give the dog another chance.... but then again its not my dog...... nor my people it growled at.


    Labs generally are not aggressive towrds other folks..... it may be the other mix coming out.....

    William
     
  9. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is not an aggression problem, it is a training problem.
     
  10. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    The problem isnt with the dog. Its the environment and lack of training. At this point a muzzle would be a wise decision and when your home , added training.

    You can also give the dog an 81 mg asperin . Canine physiology reacts to aspirin as a sedative. I give my 60 pound blue tic a baby asperin during tornado warnings so she sleeps soundly in ourstorm shelter.
     
  11. Rowenna7

    Rowenna7 Looking for my place...

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    I sure hope you can find a workable solution! I think there is still hope in your situation, make sure the dog knows who is top dog (you) and maybe implement some serious obedience training. Unfortunately I'm in a really tough situation where I need to decide whether or not to put down our 5 year old rescue Saint Bernard. A little background...he came to us a year and a half ago, we adopted him from a rescue group. Was half starved, unsocialized, had essentially been left on a chain to rot from the time he was a puppy, and I suspect abuse as well. Not to mention his fur was so neglected that he actually had a maggot infestation in it. He's very territorial...doesn't like strange people coming into the house or yard (when he's away from home he's a sweet baby to everyone). The other day when the mail lady knocked on the door to drop off a package, he was barking and jumping at the door. I didn't pay much attention to him since he always does that, pushed him back with my leg like I always do. Next thing I know he bites me hard on the top of the foot. Apparently he got himself so worked up and frustrated that he couldn't get to the mail lady that he just mentally snapped and bit at the first thing in reach, which happened to be me. The actual break in the skin isn't especially large, maybe an inch or so long...not sure how deep it went exactly, but most of the top of my foot is very bruised and sore. I have two kids at home as well, 5 and 9 years old. If this dog, who follows me everywhere and cries when he's kept away from me, will lose control and actually bite me, then what about the kids? I'm still hoping for some kind of a positive outcome on this situation...if we could find him a quiet home out in the country with no kids to worry about and none of the stimuli that sets him off, I think he'd do fine. Unfortunately a place like that for him would likely be impossible to find.Sorry to go on so long about my issue, but your post really hit a nerve since we've been agonizing over this same type of decision for the last couple of days.
     
  12. Shadow

    Shadow Well-Known Member

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    We have three large dogs, they bark when a car starts down our road by the time the car gets in sight they are wagging tails and hopeing for a petting. We adopted another that came to a neighbors house, he fit in well and durring real cold he as the others came in and layed on their blankets in the living room at night. Then one day he was trying to get into soemthing that he was not supposed to and I scolded him, he turned around growled and bared his teeth, wife said it was just a male domonace thing. About a week later she was giving them some deer scraps and he was trying to get more than his share and she scholded him, bared teeth, and growled she turned to me and said that dog is toast. Later me and the four dogs took a long walk, only three came back. There is no reason for having an aggressive dog. Franklin Tenn last week a lady takeing a walk was killed by a mans two dogs. He can only be charged with a leash law violation but it will cost him everything he owns by the time the lawyers and juidges get through with the civil suits. Around here you are treated with kindness and respect you are treated as a valued friend as long as you respond in like. Show you don't want to be our friend and you are gone. Man or animal
     
  13. buck_1one

    buck_1one Well-Known Member

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    I'll be leaving for the long drive home this morning. So this whole thing, I hope will be over soon. I hope it is just an overload of input that has put him in this "mood". Another problem is mom and my aunt are afraid of him now and I know he can sense that. So that may not be helping things. I'll stop and talk to the vet on Monday and see about bringing him in for a visit. I lost a much loved lab (Buck) just after I got this one. Him and I had a hard time of it for a while but I have grown to love him very much. I would realy hate to have to put him down. But I have a feeling at some point I'm going to have to do it.

    Buck
     
  14. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    If his attitude has made your family not want to visit you, maybe you should thank the dog. Any dog that can keep family and inlaws away is a good dog :)

    Why do you think your going to have to put him down already. Just because you think you might be incapable of properly caring for and training an animal as this doesen't mean others in your area are not able to. You may be able to place him with more capable owners if you cant control him.
     
  15. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Well-Known Member

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    We just had to have an aggressive dog put down, and it was a "little too late" scenario. However, he was not aggressive to people but to our older lab/retiever cross. This last fight I tried to break up the young big dog, Mastiff/Rhodisian Ridegback cross, would have killed the older dog and this was Vet verified after the last fight. We kept them apart, but they got outside at the same time last Sunday. Well, anyway, I lost the end of my right ring finger when I grabbed for the Mastiff cross nose and my fingers slipped in his mouth. Hindsight being 20/20 we should have had him put down after the last fight.

    Stacy
     
  16. vtfarma

    vtfarma Well-Known Member

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    I am with the rest of the people who are saying the situation he is in right now is part of the problem, as well as training. I would also have him checked at the vet (get a muzzle to keep you and the vet happy). We have australian cattle dogs. They are feisty - not mean -feisty. One of them was terrified when we went on vacation last year. The neighbor who they were all comfortable with was the caretaker. That dog hid behind the chair and growled and snarled at her. She left him food, water and a layer of newspapers everyday. He would not go out. SCARED! The rest of the dogs all were fine with her but for this little guy it was too much. He stuck to us like glue when we came home. When the neighbor comes to visit us he has no problems now. Things were just very different without us here and he didn't understand.

    I guess people have that same problem sometimes. We get out of sort when we are away from home too. One thing we found was putting in an underground fence around 5 acres of our property has allowed the acd's to roam and get rid of the extra energy. They still will occaisonally bark when someone or something goes by but they don't carry on like someone is going to murder them anymore. Maybe he needs some more exercise too. Besides it is a different area for him and he can't figure out what he is supposed to protect or take care of. Relax and he will too. DH has found that talking softly to one of our dogs and explaining what is happening helps the dog a great deal. Most of these things are alot smarter than we think they are.
     
  17. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    Is he neutered? If he's turning 2, that is a typical time for intact male dogs to start showing aggression and dominance. If he's not fixed, that would be the first thing I would do. There is NO WAY you should ever breed this dog, so there is no reason to keep him intact. After that, intense training should be next. If he continues the aggression after that, then it might be time to consider euthanizing. Aggression, particularly in a breed known for not being aggressive, is a huge problem.
     
  18. Beltane

    Beltane Enjoying Four Seasons

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    I agree with the others that a vet visit might be in order. I firmly believe that most agression issues can be resolved through training. There are 'no bad dogs' in my book. Perhaps a local animal shelter could point you in the right direction?

    Good luck ~ I hope it all works out for this pup.
     
  19. caryatid

    caryatid Well-Known Member

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    I vote Vet.

    I have a golden lab/greyhound cross. As you can imagine, not the most viscious dog in the world. He is very loving, protective of children, etc...

    A couple years ago he bit my 2yo neice on the face. We were going to have him put down, but took him to the vet first to make sure he was healthy (and that my niece wasn't in danger of anything other than his teeth). Turns out he had a very bad ear infection and went nuts when the 2yo tugged on it.

    I know my situation is vastly different from yours, but just an example of how there can be a simple explaination for what seems to be a big problem.
     
  20. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    Let's see...

    Two year old (think sixteen year old human male) dog

    unknown breed (could be crossed with Dobie... Bull Terrior?... Mastiff... Chiuaua..)

    Relocated to your custody - gets comfortable around you and in that environment then suddenly finds himself in a foreign environment around people that are grieving and stressed over the loss of a family member (yes dogs can sense stress and fear) and probably around some folks he's never seen

    he isn't socialized

    he isn't trained - probably actually feels that he is the alpha male

    his primary companion is willing to strike him

    he may have complicating medical issues

    Hmmmm... Kill him because he wasn't born knowing how to behave and interact with humans? I'd have trouble sleeping at night...

    Find someone who is willing to invest the time and effort in this animal. I SUSPECT that he sensed that either you or he were in danger and that's why he acted that way, but there is way more to owning a dog than providing food and water - and some dogs more than others. My Pyr killed two of my chickens when I first got him - it took six months of four supervised daily visits to the chickens before I was comfortable leaving him with them. Now he will let them eat out of his food dish with him, and protects them diligently. He will react to my facial expression and posture without me saying a word usually (he's also two years old) and regardless of what he's doing, if I tell him to 'sit' his butt will make skid marks in the dirt - but I invested a LOT of time to get him to that point.