To pastureize or not?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by longhorngal, Aug 31, 2005.

  1. longhorngal

    longhorngal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am still confused about CL (read the sticky above, still confused!) I'm not milking any goats yet but should I pastureize when I do have some? This is communicable to humans in raw milk? What would the signs/symtoms/outcome be in a human?
    Thanks,
    Cara
     
  2. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    I don't pasteurize for family use. Never had a problem yet.

    Ruth
     

  3. dscott7972

    dscott7972 Well-Known Member

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    We do not pasturize. We used to but I prefer it raw, never had a problem.
     
  4. chas

    chas Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't think of pastureizing and ruining the benefits of raw milk!!!
    Chas
     
  5. Milk n' Honey

    Milk n' Honey Well-Known Member

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    I don't think people ever used to pastuerize until this craze that the FDA started. In fact, I believe people were much healthier before they started listening to all the garb we are fed nowadays. I heard pastuerizing makes it taste funny. I would be interested to know if anything can be passed to a human directly through the milk without any outside contaminents entering it, such as manure particles and such.
     
  6. Julia

    Julia Well-Known Member

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    Why, bless your heart, of course there are! If you Google "Milk bourne Zoonoses" you'll find close to a hundred of them, including major infectious diseases like TB and brucellosis! And the list continues...

    As far as getting Caseous Lymphadenitis from a goat, you can be infected with it from the milk if the doe has an abcess in the udder that then breaks and drains into the milk. This is somewhat rare.

    The usual route for human infection is from contact with the pus in the abcess anywhere on the body. The symptoms are the same in humans as in goats--- abcesses. And like goats, there is no treatment.

    I wouldn't have a CL positive doe on the farm.
     
  7. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    We drink our milk raw. I have healthy goats and I take special care in the milk barn to not contaminate anything with microbes as much as possible. I have had a course in microbiology so understand full well how contamination occurs. I still prefer raw milk. I keep my milking implements very clean. I use unscented baby wipes on the udders, squirt out the first few squirts to clear out the bacteria and cool the milk down as fast as possible. We use up all the milk in one day at this point. I am just milking two does now that are almost 6 months into lactation and not being fed anything fancy. They give me a gallon a day which is what we use. Therefore the milk is never old in the fridge, never time for what bacteria is in it to multiply. My husband swears by raw goats milk, claiming it has cleared up his skin and his allergies and I believe he is right. We all seem healthier for it. .......Diane