To buy or not to buy (HUGE zub-zero freezer)

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by TxCloverAngel, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. TxCloverAngel

    TxCloverAngel Happiness is Homemade

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    I have the opportunity to buy a HUGE side-by-side commercial stainless steel sub zero freezer for $400.00

    Sounds like a GREAT buy.
    ( I know its in great working order, my friend runs the food commissary for a big airport, its one of theirs)

    I am raising a few pigs, and soon a calf for the freezer, not to mention the chickens etc etc etc.. so filling it will be no problem... but

    Its a 220 electric freezer. I know that's not hard to have put in... but another neighbor told me that a 220 actually will cost me LESS to run than my old chest freezer. (its terrible)

    Is this true? I have always wanted a sub-zero. but the electric costs concern me.
    Its so big that I'll have to put it out on my carport.. and it gets HOT here in Texas!

    anyone know anything about this?

    would a good BIG 220 cost less to run than my old chest freezer?

    Thanks!
     
  2. silverbackMP

    silverbackMP Well-Known Member

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    Generally speaking,

    220 is cheaper and more efficient than 110. Most woodworking machines run off of 220 (or have the ability to be rewired to 220) for this reason. An everyday example would be wind air conditioners--the 110s suck a bunch of power and the 220s are much more efficietn.
     

  3. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Formerly LisainN.Idaho Supporter

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    I had a sub-zero fridge and freezer in our pre-Idaho, solar power days. I miss it so much! Now I have a dinky propane fridge and chest freezer. Lucky you!
     
  4. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Nope.

    Wattage is wattage, and that is how you buy electricity.

    110v times 20 amps is 2200 watts

    If you can re-wire that same motor for 220v, your amperage draw will cut in 1/2 to 10 amps....now the math......220x10=2200 watts......same deal.

    The advantage in wiring things for higher voltage is A: you can use smaller wire....wire size is based on the amperage and B: you can use smaller fusing means ( though that isn't generally a big consideration unless you're talking LOTS of amps )


    The SubZero may or may not be cheaper to run.....it will depend on the watts of the motor, how long the motor runs, the insulation of the unit compared to your old chest freezer, etc.... Actually, the insulation and how sorry the lid seal is on your old one are probably the BIG factors......old freezers just used a fairly thin fiberglass batt type insulation, and the newer ones use foam.....and an old lid gasket can leak a lot of cold air out.....

    Hard to say right off.....but if the SubZero is a LOT bigger, my guess is your old freezer may well use less.

    AND you have to add in the cost of running a new 220v circuit for it.

    As attractive as that nice big shing Subzero might be :sing: , you might do better to pick up another used chest freezer or two.....that way, as you use up the meat in one, you can shut it down and leave the other running vesus having to run a 1/2 empty big freezer. That's what we do.
     
  5. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    That unit WILLl cost a big bunch to run.
    And if its in a hot texas garage.........oh my.

    Perhaps the only thing going for that unit is that it looks impressive.

    Think about updating "the old" freezer.

    Chest units are more efficient than uprights
     
  6. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    I bought a huge freezer from a convenience store for only $40 for use seasonally when I am processing meat. As said above, the compressor is larger and the unit pulls more power than any home chest freezer. Your best bet IMO is to buy a new efficient chest freezer.
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee Well-Known Member

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    Also note that there are two 220 volts supplied by the power company.
    220 volt 1 phase
    220 volt 3 phase
    You can only get the 1 phase in your home. If it runs on 3 phase, you cannot get the power to run it at any cost.
     
  8. vicky

    vicky Well-Known Member

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    An upright is always more to run than a chest freezer. We got a 25 cu chest from Sam's Club delivered for around the same you are paying. Of course it's not the same commercial type that you speak of. Also keep in mind that you'll also have to run a separate line from the breaker in order to hook this up. Which only gets expensive if you can't do the electrical work yourself
    vicky
     
  9. shawnee

    shawnee Well-Known Member

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    If it is tremendously huge even after you have filled it with your goodies maybe you could rent space to others? Might help with the operating costs - just a thought. Also, in the winter when it's cold my hubby barely cracks lid on chest freezer and turns off. Maybe you could do that in the winter; why pay for elect. during winter if it's already cold outside?
     
  10. Oldotaku

    Oldotaku Member

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    Also, be very careful where you site the cooler. I did some frozen soil research a while back, and my boss got a call from a company in New Jersey that had a big walk-in freezer on an unisulated concrete basement floor, next to a corner. After running for decades, the cooler was being removed, when they discovered it had frozen the subsurface water beneath the building, creating a huge block of ice. As it started thawing, the soil around that corner of the building was subsiding, and was going to wreck the entire building, unless they could fix it quick. My boss wasn't able to help, as we didn't do anything that large, but I could just see the building sinking into a mudhole just before it ripped apart from the opposite corner staying still.
     
  11. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Actually, Iddee, for future reference, you can buy a phase converter and run 3 phase equipment off of single phase.....it's done all the time.

    ( NOT recomending it in this case....it would make the economics of this deal even worse )
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee Well-Known Member

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    Yes, or make your own with just a capacitor, or the fields of an electric motor. Neither recommended.
     
  13. TxCloverAngel

    TxCloverAngel Happiness is Homemade

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    yep.. I actually thought about that, even asked a few neighbors if they would be interested. they all want to raise a hog or calf for meat but have no room for storage. dont have a clue what I'd charge tho...
     
  14. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i would buy the freezer...it seems cheap and you want to. it will make you happy.

    i know that relatively speaking concerning all sizes of freezers, if it is full it is more efficient than if it is half empty. the food acts as a thermal bank i suppose. now i wonder how having a larger thermal bank of frozen food would affect the economics of running a larger freezer. if a larger freezer was full most of the time would it really run that much?
     
  15. ladycat

    ladycat Chicken Mafioso Staff Member

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    She lives in south Texas. Probably seldom even reaches freezing temps. It's pretty warm down there.
     
  16. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    You can impress your neighbors with it.


    Just don't tell them what it did to your electric bill.
     
  17. dmckean44

    dmckean44 Well-Known Member

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    Paying $400 to add $50/mo to your electric bill is no bargain.
     
  18. TxCloverAngel

    TxCloverAngel Happiness is Homemade

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    wow! you think it could be THAT much? I really have no clue.
     
  19. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    I have no clue how much my freezer uses either. It depends not only on how it was designed, but how you are using it, where you place it, how well exposed the coils are, and whether or not it is in need of maintenance. Refrigerators really ought to come with some digital readout to tell you how many kwh they use each day. I think you can now buy a simple little device to monitor an appliance, but they are probably not designed to work on 220.

    Don't look a gift horse in the mouth, unless it is a freezer. :1pig:
     
  20. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    Temperature Setting and Room Temperature and Room Placement can make a HUGE difference, depending on the model and the state that it is in. Like a runner, if you are a little out shape you can still keep up fairly well with a star athelete, but if you have to start sprinting up hills that is different.

    If you have to put it in a shaded carport, you might be able to cool the coils somehow, perhaps even with a trickle of running water on a cotton cloth. Texas is dry, so if you have a bit of a breeze in your carport you might be able to evaporatively cool the coils that give off heat from the back of the freezer, or at least evaporatively cool the air going to the coils, that might help in a big way. What you want to avoid is the operation of the freezer making the space even warmer than it already is. I see a lot of fridges and freezers jammed right in against a wall and closed in. Also, I would set the temperature of the freezer as low as it needs to be, but not much lower than that.