Tips/plans building a hay rack?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by wmk0002, Feb 22, 2013.

  1. wmk0002

    wmk0002 Well-Known Member

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    To begin with, this is my first post here. I purchased my first goats last weekend (8 percentage boer does). Being a goat rookie I have tons to learn but I think I have a good grasp on what they need to stay healthy and how to diagnose and treat some of their major illnesses.

    Though one specific thing I have a question on is how to build a hay rack (and grain trough while on topic). I have seen a few custom ones online that are 8-10 feet long, appear to be made from v-bent cattle panel, have a tray under the rack to catch fallen hay, and even ones with a tin roof for if one is to be placed outdoors. Now I'm sure I can figure it out on my own but I was really hoping someone here knew of a video or website with specific instructions. I would like to make 1 for inside my barn as well as another for the pasture which had a slanted tin roof.

    I would also, like to build a wall mounted feeder out of pvc pipe. That definitely looks like a straightforward task, however, 10 feet of 6" pvc is rather expensive so I would want to do it right the first time.

    Any advice, tips, instructions, or pics of your personal hay rack of feeder would greatly be appreciated. TIA!
     
  2. where I want to

    where I want to Well-Known Member

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    I wonder if PCV, even high pressure, will not end up getting cracked. I've never tried it but have had the little dears break metal loose.
    Anyway for a wall feeder, I have two things I want. One is that it must have a pan to catch the fines and that must be above butt (or poop on) height. Then I like a ledge for them to put their front feet on while they eat. This helps keep them from shifting around as much and dropping hay. Because once on the ground, they tend not to eat it and hay is very, very expensive here.
    Have you searched for feeders in the goat section - there have been lots of pictures of feeders over the years.
     

  3. wmk0002

    wmk0002 Well-Known Member

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    Good points. I will consider those whenever I make the feeder. I may go with PCV, but I may also just create it entirely out of wood. I may do a little cost analysis in the next few days before I commit one way or the other.
     
  4. punchiepal

    punchiepal Well-Known Member

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    Download the PDF on this page. We got panels much like this (4x4 squares) at TSC.
     
  5. wmk0002

    wmk0002 Well-Known Member

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    What pdf are you referring to? I don't see any links or attachments. Thanks.
     
  6. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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  7. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    One I made on the wall of the barn
     
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  8. Hollowdweller

    Hollowdweller Well-Known Member

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    Not sure if you can see in the background.
     
  9. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    Question about keyhole feeders. Do you have a problem with any particular goat BASHING another goat with her head in the feeder and she can't see it coming?

    Nice udder. :)
     
  10. punchiepal

    punchiepal Well-Known Member

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  11. punchiepal

    punchiepal Well-Known Member

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    These are the ones we ended up making for the barn. Dh made the one w/ fence on it. The 1/2 barrels, I cut with my little cutting multi-tool thing and used fencing wire to wire them to the fence.
     
  12. Frosted Mini's

    Frosted Mini's Well-Known Member

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    I can't seem to see a hay feeder in that picture of the beautiful udder. ;)
     
  13. Hollowdweller

    Hollowdweller Well-Known Member

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    Not really. Remember they are saanens.

    It's happened a time or two but not often.

    Those in the background there are actually my grain feeders and there is a long hook and eye thing I can lock their heads in for vaccinations and stuff (but usually don't)

    But my hay feeders are the same way. 8" hole 4" slot. With the keyhole hay feeder you want to have it to where they have to reach up to get their head in and then you want to not have the slot go all the way down to the bottom.

    By making them reach up to put their head in there is less chance they will take their head OUT when eating.

    Also if you make the slot go all the way down to the bottom then they will pull hay thru the slot rather than put their head in. So I put a 1' lip all the way around the bottom floor of the feeder.
     
  14. wmk0002

    wmk0002 Well-Known Member

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    Just wanted to bump the thread and say I appreciate all of the responses. I'm still undecided on what I'm going to build but I went ahead and ordered three 16' x 50" goat panels with the 4x4 in openings from the county farmers coop which which I will use in building the rack. BTW, anyone who needs some of those panels should check around on prices...I think they are $45+ at TSC and other places but from my local coop they were only $30 and I believe the wire is even a little thicker gauge than the ones at TSC.
     
  15. wmk0002

    wmk0002 Well-Known Member

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  16. wmk0002

    wmk0002 Well-Known Member

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    Whoops, I was wrong on the price. They were $35 instead of $30. But I also checked back on TSC's website and their goat panels are $55! $20 difference plus the ones at the Co-op appear to be thicker gauge.
     
  17. punchiepal

    punchiepal Well-Known Member

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  18. Copperhead

    Copperhead Well-Known Member

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    Going against the grain here . . . (slight pun intended), I really like a haynet to feed goats. Right now, I am feeding 10 full sized Boer and Kiko mixed goats from a 5x5 pocket. I ordered a 5x5x10 piece of netting with 1.5" gap between threads from http://gourock.com/precut-netting.html and used my knot-tying skills on 2 sides to form the pocket or pouch.

    Our goats go through 50lbs of hay each day. The hay, usually 1st cutting, is their sole source of winter feed unless the temperature gets below 20F. Then, they do get subsidized with a 50/50 mix of Alfalfa pellets and BOSS. We put anywhere between 50 and 100lbs of hay in the net, depending on how frisky we feel and how much help we have. We also sing "Here comes Santa Claus . . . "

    The haynet must be Free-Hanging!!! I have eyebolts or screw hooks in the top and center of the shelter. If the haynet is against a wall, the goats will climb on top, try to force their heads into the opening, or eat holes in the sides. With the haynet swinging freely, the foolishness stops and they actually eat.

    On a side note, we have an 8' trough made from rough sawmill 2x8x8's next to the fence. We have decided that it was no longer wise (aka safe) to walk in the goat pen bearing treats. We stand on our side of the electric fence, pull one side of the trough to our side, add the Alfalfa/BOSS, and push the trough back to the goats. The goats learned quickly that those who fought over treats went hungry while those who ate, got treats! And did I mention, ELECTRIC fence!!! :runforhills:
     
  19. momagoat61

    momagoat61 Well-Known Member

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    I have several 5 and 6 foot PVC grain feeders, the thick wall kind and mine are probably close to 20 years old or older, Those feeders have held a lottttttttttt of feed over the years: I remember when I first got goats I purchased 5 grain feed pans, that didn't work and was a joke, those feed pans over the years have been used for changing oil in the lawn mower and 4 wheelers and feeding the dog.