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Discussion Starter #1
The children and I built a large porch 16 by 17 feet / used shed roof style and put tin roof on it / we used the 1 X 4 treated wood pieces to make cross slats over the treated roof rafters but the roof leaked. We have checked everything we know to check (flashing, nail holes, we re did part with longer overlap and etc.) A friend is on the way to take a look and see what is to be done......

Meanwhile, we have decided that the whole space is nice enough to go on and enclose it to make a large mud room / laundry room. We have wood for walls already and about half the insulation..... BUT we have to insulate and fix the roof.

Option One:
NOT our favorite would be to tear off the tin and start over?

Option Two:
Put more fresh tin over what is already there?

Option Three:
Put down a layer of black tar paper / then a layer of the solid foam insulation / then more tar paper / then fresh tin? Would that work? Seems like that may insulate the ceiling space?

Any other ideas? Thank you very much.
 

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what type of pitch is on the roof? How much drop versus how much length? What type of fasteners were used?
I really think option one is the only option. But, you must first find out what has been done wrong or the same thing will probably happen again.
 

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Nel frattempo Your best bet is to cote the roof with an elestamaric coating. They sell it at most hardware stores (Home Depot Ace and others). The coating will fill the cracks in your tin and seal any nail holes.Whan you put it up use a brom to get enough so that it will do a good job.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well........I 'don no nothing 'bout no pitch.......lets see.......the roof would be 16 feet by 17 feet since that is the size of the room? It is a Shed Roof and we just followed the already there Shed Roof line to copy it. We did use a level so that part is correct.......

We used those nails with the black rubber thing on the under side.

I think we messed up the flashing and / or we did not have enough over lap where the two pieces of tin meet going down the roof. We only had about 6 to 8 inches of over lap.

THAT is why I was wondering can I just put a long pieces right on top of the ones that are there? I could use fresh pieces about 8 feet long and that would cover up any leak area and be a 4 foot over lap........?

Is the elestamaric coating that tar stuff? We used some on the flashing and it is a MESS! OR is the elestramaric coating more like a paint?

Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It is leaking! It leaked two places, we tarred some, then it leaked two more places. I think it may be leaking around the flashing..........friend on the way to look but then I decided to enclose the whole room and wondered if there is some way to insulate from above rather than below.....
 

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I've had good luck using screws to attach metal roofs. Home Depot and Lowes sell them. Here is a link to show an example: http://www.bestmaterials.com/woodgrip-screws-538.html

Note that the screws will sometimes "back out" as the weather changes and the metal expands and shrinks. I think (but don't know) that this is worse with a dark colored roof than it is with a lighter colored version.

Good luck getting your roof leak stopped and your addition completed.
 

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Forgive me if this sounds condescending, but if you have NO IDEA what a roof pitch means, then it is going to be extremely difficult for you (and us) to try and fix this problem. I would strongly suggest that you wait for "your friend" to arrive and look the situation over.......hopefully he has some knowledge of roofing; maybe even some experience in same......if not, then I'd say it's time to get an expert in there and FIX the problem(s)......as they will only get worse if you continue to do things that you have no idea whether it will help or not. Money, time, materials and labor going out.......and in the end, it will ALL have to be either torn off and restarted or........who knows? :shrug:
 

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I'm gonna second letting your friend come over and look at it before you sink anymore into this project. Before you get on with putting in any insulation you have to fix the leak---water leaking in means wet insulation, think rot, mildew, and mold. As for 'could be's' it could be your flashing, could be the overlap, could be a bad fastener or two. Roofs are tricky in that water can travel in some crazy ways. Don't waste your time or effort just adding more things on, let's get it fixed and move on to the next step. Wish I could give you a better idea on the leak but it is one of those things you need to see to properly decide.
The elastemeric coating you asked about goes on like a thick paint, dries like a coat of rubber. It's flexible and move as the roof moves.
Finally, congrats to you and the kids getting the porch up. Double congrats on being able to have a mud room.
 

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copperkid said:
Forgive me if this sounds condescending, but if you have NO IDEA what a roof pitch means, then it is going to be extremely difficult for you (and us) to try and fix this problem. I would strongly suggest that you wait for "your friend" to arrive and look the situation over.......hopefully he has some knowledge of roofing; maybe even some experience in same......if not, then I'd say it's time to get an expert in there and FIX the problem(s)......as they will only get worse if you continue to do things that you have no idea whether it will help or not. Money, time, materials and labor going out.......and in the end, it will ALL have to be either torn off and restarted or........who knows? :shrug:
Oh phooey! If people didn't jump in with both feet, even when they have no experience, where would we be as a species? I think it's great that the OP has the hutspa to take on the task.
BTW, pitch means how much "fall" do you have over the roof line. It's a measure arive at by the variance in height from each end and the width.
 

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If the first tin you put on leaks, why would the second layer of tin do any better unless you figure out what you did wrong?

You really need to figure that out.

I am guessing you messed up the flashing, which you have to do right. The polymer coating will probably not be a long term fix for improper flashing, it is better for nail holes and the like.

When you said you only had 6 inches overlap where the two bits of tin meet, did you mean in the valley of the roof, or did you mean between 2 parallel pieces? In a valley, you need more overlap I think.

I would get someone to look at it, and be prepared to tear down and do again. If it is worth doing, it is worth doing right...

Good luck.
 

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Low pitched metal roofs need the long running joint where the metal overlaps to have roll caulking installed the length of the metal. During heavy rains the roof will "flood" and flow between the lapped metal joint. To know whether the roof laps or the flashing is at fault determine if the roof leaks in slow light rains or in heavy rains. Heavy rain leaks is a joint without caulking and light slow rain leaking is flashing.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you everyone. Our helper arrived and pointed out we did just about everything wrong - but we at least tried and have now learned. The flashing is wrong and we also did not overlap the two parrallel pieces go together. We are going to pull off all the flashing, and we only have to take off 5 pieces of tin (and we can save it for wood shed tops or a storage shed that won't matter if it has a few holes) and I did have enough good tin left..........and best of all our friend and a buddy have agreed to come supervise the children and I tomorrow night. Thank you about the caulking suggestion - we can pick that up tomorrow too.

As for us taking on projects of which we have little knowledge and totally no experience -- we love it! We learn, the children learn, it is mostly fun, we have satisfaction even from the jobs (like this one) that we "mess up" and have to do again. We get so many good ideas and suggestions from this site too.....and we thank you all.

Thanks!
 

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I did the same thing. I built a 8'x12' storage shed and put tin roof on it. It leaked bad. I fixed it by coating it with a sealer that is made for mobile home roofs. I got the stuff at walmart for $10 a gallon. It's kind of like a white puff paint. It insulates and seals leaks. Worked great! Good luck with your project.
 

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As long as you learn from your mistales then it is some good. The stuff that Spinner is talking is the elestomeric coating.It goes on like a thick paint and dries to form a type of ruber caot on the tin.
 

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The coating that is used on rvs dries like rubber and is flexable. It is made by Koolseal but won't crack like the silver stuff. If you are going to close it in to make a room coat it with the elestic sealer and head off future problems. It also dries white and makes a great lookin roof. Good luck. Sam
 

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Nel frattempo said:
Well........I 'don no nothing 'bout no pitch.......lets see.......the roof would be 16 feet by 17 feet since that is the size of the room? It is a Shed Roof and we just followed the already there Shed Roof line to copy it. We did use a level so that part is correct.......

We used those nails with the black rubber thing on the under side.

I think we messed up the flashing and / or we did not have enough over lap where the two pieces of tin meet going down the roof. We only had about 6 to 8 inches of over lap.

THAT is why I was wondering can I just put a long pieces right on top of the ones that are there? I could use fresh pieces about 8 feet long and that would cover up any leak area and be a 4 foot over lap........?

Is the elestamaric coating that tar stuff? We used some on the flashing and it is a MESS! OR is the elestramaric coating more like a paint?

Thank you
I understand you got help from someone there, good for you. May I comment on this message anyhow? :)

1. A roof should have overhang, and most should be 'pitched' or angled to allow the rain & snow to run off. So, a roof would _always_ be larger than the room it covers.

2. A level - to make the line of the roof across the wall? Or a level to make a 'level' roof that is totally flat? You don't want a totally level metal roof - as in flat. I was a bit confused as to what your 'level' roof means.

3. Screws are generally superior to nails for holding down metal roofs. With either need to be careful not to squish the ridges of the tin. Old days the nails used to have lead heads on them - soft enough to seal the tin a little bit. Now either nails or screws come with rubberized washers - aka gaskets - on them for metal roofing/ siding.

4. Amount of overlap depends on 2 things - do you get snow (ice dam issues - that is a whole long topic on it's own) and the pitch of the roof. The 'pitch' is how steep it is, how angled it is. If your roof is 16 feet long and the lower side is 4 feet lower that the higher side, you would have a 4/16 or 1/4 pitch. For every 4 feet of roof, it drops 1 foot. More pitch is almost always much better, but of course it costs more.

4b. So, if you have a flat or shallow pitch, more overlap is better, but as mentioned you can put in material between the sheets on an overlap to caulk it.

4c. If I had a 16' long roof, I would buy 16' long tin and not have any overlap!!!! They always end up causing issues. Tin can be ordered up to 40' long, there is no need to overlap. You are wasting the material that is overlapped, so there is no cost savings with shorter pieces overlapped. Dad & I put 36' long tin on the top of our big old barn, just the 2 of us, way up there. You can handle a 16' long piece as easily as 2 8+' long pieces to cover your roof.

5. Flashing is a difficult thing. Water needs to run over the top. Flashing is the layers that make this happen, and sandwitches of tin need to be built in the right order. Easy to say, takes some thought to make it happen right. This a 'gotta be there to help' topic, so glad you got some help on it.

6. Placing tin over tin generally isn't a good idea. It tends to trap moisture between, and that causes the tin to rust out real early. (Yes, overlaps are tin on tin, but for short bits that are not so likely to trap moisture, not the whole roof long....) The bottom layer nails will be in the way, and wear through the top layer over time. Just doesn't work very well long term. Not a good idea.

6b. Until you got your intial leaks & reasons figured out, just placing more tin on top is a real bad idea - as it turns out, the flashing was the problem, and the water still would have run under both layers of tin - wasted effort & material & no changte in the problem. If the first layer didn't work, find the problem, don't make it 2x as expensive & worse. :) :)

7. There are a lot of roof coatings that will seal up some leaks. Lot of times if you talk to the hardware/box store about mobile home coatings, they will get you to the section. These are good to give an old rusty some holes roof another 5 or maybe more years of life. However, a good tin roof done right should last 30 years or so before needing any serious attention. Putting on new tin & needing to coat it right away & then every 5 years or so afterwards is not a good use of time & resources. The tin dad put on the building roofs 40-45 years ago are just now needing their first coat of alumapaint, and should be good for another 15-20 years with that. This paint is much thiner than the elasto paint others are mentioning, it is an oil & aluminum flakes. It is meant to be used before there are leaks on an old tin roof, and replace the worn out galvinised or galvalum outer skin of a tin roof with a new aluminum coating. The big 'however' is that you need to use this on a roof that is still sound, before anything rusts through. But, sure is the best bang for the buck. Our grainery was built in 1909. Dad had it painted with the aluminum flakes perhaps 30 years ago, & I had it painted 2 years ago. Should be good until 2030-35 or so.

7b. Tar type coatings are real messy. Elasto type coatings are sorta messy but not too bad, are more like thick paint, dry to a thin rubbery coat, last 5 or so years. The alumina/ oil coatings are like an oil based paint, pretty easy to spray on, not as messy, but need to be used before there are real problems. They dry to a layer of oil with aluminum flakes floating on top, the oil seals & heals any rust patches, the aluminum makes a hard outer coating. For a few months to a year, light scratches will actually heal up as the aluminum keeps floating on the oil. (New epa rules make this effect less & less as the 'good stuff' gets outlawed in oil based paint.) Typically lasts 15-20 years.

8. You have a real good attitude about getting advise & ideas from these short impersonal text messages, so please understand this long message was written as just random info that works around my farm in a northern snow climate, and is not a critisism of anything you did or tried. Good luck with the revisitions & keep on learning. :)

(edited because I can't spell or type....)

--->Paul
 

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Skipping in between because its about 2 in the morning, it sounds like your using what is known as 5-V galvanized sheet metal roofing. 26 inches wide and varied lengths.

Such is correctly installed by placing the outer pair of upside down 'V's overlapped the previous sheets pair.

A ding or depression is installed on the outer elevated via a hammer, a hole is created in the raised area. The fastener goes through this hole, never in the flat area of the sheet.

The nails or screws with the black washer under its head is known as neopreme (neo o' preme), fasteners. About $3.00 per pound locally.

I have seen this failure of correct installation many times over the last 50 years.
 

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Metal roof will swaet if metal is exposed, should have been placed over sheathing and tar paper. treated wood should not have been used as chemicals in wood will corroded metal roofing. I just finished tearing off a new porch roof and re doing it because of some of these issues.
 
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