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agmantoo
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a newly purchased 30 month old bull. He arrived after a cross country 6 day trip on Saturday . Everything here is new to him. He is adjusting to a change of feed, change of temperature and me. He has never been with a herd of cattle as he was collected. He is also unfamiliar with a high tensile electric fence. Fortunately he is docile but he has no awareness of his strength. Even though he is polled, today he tossed a new 800 lb round bale of hay in the air like it was a ping pong ball. I forgot to mention he weighed 1905 lbs prior to departure from his previous owner. I introduced him to the herd and after sniffing about he decided to walk off. It was by chance that I observed he was leaving and I managed to get him back into a corral. Now I have two cows with him for company and I will be feeding the 3 hay for some duration. My question is how long do you think it will be before he accepts his new home and his assigned responsibilities? Here is a pic. let me introduce you to Just Right ... Murray Grey
 

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on furlough-downsized
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Agman, that is one SOLID fella. Good thing he doesn't know his own strength!
I bet he'll make you some nice calves!
 

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Agman, given your stockmanship, I think I'm vaguely surprised that your asking the question and wondering if it's a bit of a test?

Admittedly, a 6 day trip is a long way to travel but if he's arrived at your place quiet, not ripping the place apart and did no more than walk off after having a bit of a sniff at your herd, he's not a bull I would be overly worried about. I know your fencing will be top notch and if your cows are ready to run with the bull, I would be letting him in with them in another day or so. Probably the quikest and best way to make him feel at home.

Murray Grey eh? I know you were interested in them and seems you are taking it further? Sue (I think I pointed you her way in the past) has been doing very well with hers and I suspect that this is a breed that will go up there with Angus and Hereford.

Forgot to add that he is a fine looking animal and hope he does you well.

Cheers,
Ronnie
 

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Joy
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When we got our new bull, we corralled him up w/two cows for 2 days, then turned them all out together. No problems since.

-Joy
 

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Udderly Happy!
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It's up in the air. I've seen some new bulls be put in the pasture and go right to work while others show more interest in exploring the boundaries of their new home. Being that he has been a collection bull makes me wonder if he actually "knows" what his duties are. I'm quite sure he will figure it out. But up to this time there has been no foreplay involved in his duties. One thing for certain, when you have a cow cycling you'll know for sure how long it will take! Once he does his business with one, he will probably hang around for his next opportunity.
 

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I believe any new animal should be given a week or two, to get used to the change of situation. Your bull, being used for collection possibly might never have seen the outside of the facility? So he needs to get over the shipping, get used to you and your place and routine, and it may be his first time to associate with other animals in a more natural environment.
I have read about a show ram, over conditioned, never had to graze for his food, being turned in to serve a flock of sheep, going missing and being found with his front and back legs each side of a log and no idea what to do, and I dont think he ever did serve his ewes. I hope your lovely bull figures out why he's there, when a cow comes into heat! He sounds pretty mellow.
Even my dexter bull can tip a 800 lb round bale. He gets it rocking first.ck
 

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agmantoo
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Like others have stated, I too have brought new bulls in and a lip curl was on their agenda and you could not have run them off. My experience with AI, collection of semen and embryo transplants is nonexistent. The bull's near indifference toward the cows is what has me baffled. He has no competition as I have relocated the only other large bull that was on the place. I am training the bull to a hot wire at this time, I know how to do that. Thanks for the replies.
 

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agmantoo
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
cowkeeper
My description was a little lacking regarding the hay. I have the bull in a holding pen that has a 6 ft heavy chain link fence. Being as this is only for holding cattle there is no feed ring for the hay and I placed the new bale of hay that my neighbor just baled in a corner of the pen. The bull got under the 4' x 5' bale and with the bale against the fence lifted it up over his head and let it fall back on his back. It was very much a sight to behold. He does not like the hay to eat, he seems to want west coast hay.
 

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KS dairy farmers
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If the bull was never run with a cowherd, psychologically he may be the equivalent of a new young herd bull being turned out for the first time.

A group of 30 -100 amorous cows or heifers can overwhelm a new bull and run him down so hard that he goes timid and therefore never establishes his dominant role at the very top of the pecking order. Once a bull goes timid, they may never again serve their purpose.

Now the odds are that the hearty lad you show here will hit the ground running and establish his dominance immediately, perhaps flipping the old boss cow in the air as he did the round bale, LOL.

And yet, given the substantial investment a bull like this undoubtedly represents, one might choose to protect the investment by using gradual acclimation. Once he understands your fencing and you have had a few days of observation just to be sure the transport and change of climate did not bring on any respiratory ailments, perhaps one could sort off 5 open cows from the main herd, and merge them with the new bull.
Then observe, and if he takes charge of his new herd of 5, add 20 a few days later. If he masters the herd of 25 and establishes his dominance, merge the whole herd.
 

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agmantoo
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Translplant, the new bull has adjusted nicely. He has developed a taste for the fescue and is recognizing the bounds of the electric fence. He is now wearing his work clothes and going about his assigned work. he had lost a few pounds when I had him in training for the electrified fence but I think he has put the weight back on. He seems content and I think he will now stay here.
 

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It will be interesting to see what condition he's in after a breeding season, but he looks like he'll be a good one though.

Bob
 

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agmantoo
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
topside1
I run the bull with the herd year round, calving 12 months per year. I sell feeder calves at least quarterly. As a result I think it lowers my financial risks as I should average selling into the lows and highs of the market. Typically the price of farm products are lowest when the market is flooded. I do not want to compete with the Fall and Spring calves going to market in mass. In years of adequate rain I have a surplus of grass in late Spring, otherwise I have a headcount that can normally utilize the forage that is available through out the year. I have a good 90 days days ahead of me to feed the stockpiled grass but I feel comfortable. Grass grazed 2 months ago shows some recovery and should not shutdown totally until Jan. How is your feed holding? As you can see from the pic, the back side of some of my stock indicates they are loose but that is not a concern. Actually I view it as a plus as the feed is nutrient rich.
 
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