timber king log splitter?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by minnikin1, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    Has anyone heard of this brand? We found a used one but
    the manufacturer seems to be defunct.
     
  2. greenmech

    greenmech Member

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    Sorry never heard of or worked on a "timberking" but they are all pretty much designed the same. The most important thing is which engine was used and which pump is on it. Check the hyd. fluid make sure it is clear. Other than that most parts are available off the shelf for any splitter so if the price is right go for it cause it sure beats the ax.
     

  3. longrider

    longrider Southern Gent

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    try www.timberking.com they use to be one of the top brands in the business. i havent kept up though. i checked the website, seems to be just fine.
     
  4. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    Minnikin:

    Check the features it has. Does it have wheels that permit you to tow it down the road or must it be trailered if you go of your own place? Some do not have "highway wheels".

    Is the engine in good shape? Start easily, run well, governor work? Does it use oil excessively? Try it out; when the ram starts splitting a tough piece of wood you should hear the governor open up. If it does not there is a problem.

    Does it have a single stage or a two-stage pump? A single stage pump has only one speed--if the ram cannot split a log at that speed it stalls and the bypass opens up. A two-stage pump runs at high pressure but in an easy shove more hydraulic fluid is moved at a lower pressure. When greater resistance is encountered valves close and a much higher pressure is delivered at a lower volume--like moving a truck into low gear.

    Does it shove a wedge into the log or does it push a log onto a splitting wedge? both work, but the type that shoves a splitting wedge into the log is a bit more versatile.

    Can it be used flat and upright, or does it have only one fixed position? It is much easier to split large billets if you can roll them on the ground into position under a wedge being shoved down onto it. If the splitter cannot be put in an upright position you must lift these larger billets onto the bed of the splitter or just not use them.

    Somewhere on the splitter there should be a capacity emblem; something like "Timberking 25 ton". It it is much less than 20 tons you will have trouble splitting some woods unless you cut it into very short billets. If it has an engine of 8 horses or up it probably is big enough to work well even if you cannot find the capacity emblem.

    I would not worry about minor hydraulic leaks. Most of these splitters are consumer items with cheap hydraulic cylinders. Even when they leak pretty badly about all that is required to fix them is replacing O rings. Try it out though; if it spurts hydraulic fluid like a cut artery you have a repair job on your hands before you start, and if you cannot do it yourself it will be costly. If it does not leak more than drip or two at each shove it is usable as is. Most of them will do more leaking on the return stroke than on the shove.
    Ox
     
  5. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    We went there. This company says they get this question all the time but it's not their product, they make sawmills only.


    Thanks Oxankle and all, for the tips.
    We went ahead and bought the thing because it looks to be in perfect condition and it was only $150. (25 ton) We spent nearly half of that to rent one a couple weeks ago!