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Discussion Starter #1
I know that tillers are meant to break up clods of sane soil NOT dig in packed clay but, that is what i need to do.
I have used the tiller in clay before and made a certain amount of progress.
The big thing is that the flat blades can't bite. So, my idea is to weld teeth like nubs on the the cutting edge and face of the blades, kind of like on a boreing machine.
Thoughts? Suggestions?
 

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I know that tillers are meant to break up clods of sane soil NOT dig in packed clay but, that is what i need to do.
I have used the tiller in clay before and made a certain amount of progress.
The big thing is that the flat blades can't bite. So, my idea is to weld teeth like nubs on the the cutting edge and face of the blades, kind of like on a boreing machine.
Thoughts? Suggestions?
I think you get better results plowing first, then tilling.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't have a tractor and some of the places i need to dig are too confined for a tractor.
I have hand dug first before with a shovel. I'm trying to eliminate some of the hand digging.
 

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What type tiller is it ? Rear tine ? Brand ? Can you change implements on it like a BCS, or is it fixed tines ?
 

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I think it's a good idea...I'm afraid welding on those tines may not work too well, since they're probably hardened/tempered....but I guess it's worth a shot. Maybe see if you can find a used set to try it out on before you ruin a "good set".

I can tell you from experience I can't weld harrow discs...dad could, and make em hold for years....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the input.
I know some guys that do welding/fabricating for some major companies and the railroad, i'll see what they say about welding on hardened steel and have them do it if it is doable.
 

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My advice is NO. I don't know if the tines are weldable or not, but if you can, in due time the welds will round off and present an even thicker surface to the clay soil. I suggest you spend your money on a good broad fork instead. Ahead of your tilling path push the fork into the soil and move it back and forth to loosen up the clay first. Hopefully you are tilling and incorporating sand and biomass into your soil. Maybe a bit of gypsum for the first year will help loosen it so you can get the job done.

geo
 

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My dad made a skid for the troy built horse my mom used when she was going to do a new garden in a confined place. Set the depth gauge to the minum depth hook that skid on and let the tiller tow the skid and her across the area slow. then change the depth gauge deeper and repete.

My tiller is a conter rotating tine tiller dug clay much better but still worked best if the ground was plowed first.
Add in manure any kind for future ease in working it.

:D Al
 

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Sharpening the highest wear areas of the tine cutting faces into a chisel face might pay off (single face like lawn mower blade) for this one job and maybe also an even notching into the wear areas to leave ribbons of clay proud to be shaved away as tiller progress --- and, oh yes, just very mild metal removal if one doesn't have a spare set of tines! (yet).
 
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