tiller advice

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by gwithrow, Mar 30, 2005.

  1. gwithrow

    gwithrow Well-Known Member

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    Can you all help with advice on what is/are the best tillers? best prices...we would probably want a new one, unless we were to find a great deal on one not too used up...also where to get one? that seems a little silly as there are plenty of stores out there...but I thought it would be good to ask before we just buy..thanks..genna
     
  2. Ed in S. AL

    Ed in S. AL Well-Known Member

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    I bought a new TroyBilt Bronco last spring, and I love it. I'll never own another front tine tiller as long as I live. I love the way this thing even makes up my row for me. Think I paid about $450 for it.
     

  3. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Buy the best that you can justify or afford, as the saying you get what you pay for really holds true.

    I have owned a spade, a cheap front tine tiller, a Cub Cadet lawn tractor tiller, a BCS two wheeled tractor with tiller attachment, a Ford 1720 with a 3 point tiller, and have used a Troy-Bilt roto-tiller.

    I used the spade for the first few years of married life B.F. (before money), and it seved the purpose quite well. If you do a a few minutes of spading each day it doesn't take long before it is all done. My dad used that process when in his late 80s if I didn't get his garden roto-tilled very early. He did it as much for the exercise as productivity.

    Roto-tilling does mix the soil and amendments well, and a sip of gasoline in a tiller will do far more work preparing a garden than a full meal in ones tummy.

    The front tined tiller was just fine and after the first year the ground was mellow and I never did feel like the tiller beat me to death as so many report. I do like a front tined tiller when having to roto-till inside of a fenced area. You can get closer with one of them than others. They do a good job for the money they cost.

    I sold the front tined tiller after I had purchased a used Cub Cadet with tiller attachment. It could cover far more ground quicker than the front tine machine.
    It could also till deeper.

    The 3 point tiller on my Ford 1720 is 68" wide and covers a lot of ground fast. It will roto-till in plant material that is taller than 6' without a whimper, leaving only a small amount of residue to be seen on the surface, the rest mixed in well with the soil for quick sheet composting. An excellent machine for larger operations.

    The BCS is by far the best of all I have spoken of thus far. Two wheeled BCS and roto-tiller attachment cost more than the 3 point tiller however. I actually didn't buy this machine, I accepted it and a chipper shredder in trade for a motorcyle. Priorities change you know.

    I was thrilled to get to use a medium sized Troy-Bilt about 3 years ago. However what I got was utter disappointment from all of the hype they get as to how great they are. Yes it did a good job, however it did not leave as nice a finished seedbed as does the BCS. While not difficult to control, the Troy-Bilt was moreso that way than the BCS. That is just my personal opinion you must remember. They do a good job and are far better than a front tined tiller for leaving a great seedbed. For the cost, compared to a BCS, an excellent tiller that I would be proud to own IF I DIDN'T OWN A BCS.

    Many rental centers now have Troy-Bilt units as their main machine. Why not rent one and give one a try.
     
  4. gwithrow

    gwithrow Well-Known Member

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    good idea about the rental, we will see if there is a rental place here...not to sound completely ignorant, but what is a BCS?...what we need is a machine to do garden and some lawn projects..we may end up with raised beds so the vegetable gardening may not require long term tilling...what I would really like is a tractor with attachments, however we are now back to the Before money stage after all the renovations here...and the spade is a great way to do a lot of projects...I am leary of looking for a used tractor since I wouldn't know if it worked or not, or if would work for very long...but I am headed to the phone to see about a rental for a day or so..thanks.
     
  5. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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  6. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    last year we spent about 300 dollars on a little mantis tiller.. Mainly because hubby cant always get to the tilling when *I* want it done!
    I LOVE my little tiller. It is lightweight, runs fantastic, easy to start and tills as good as (maybe better) those big tillers that I fight with.
    I even ran over my raised bed with it this spring to get things going, worked wonderful. There are tons of attachments available for it for edging and other stuff that we dont do....