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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it OK to till between rows of raspberries? I know that all these plants are interconnected.

And if so, how close can I get to my plants in my rows?
 

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I don't think cutting the roots connecting two plants would hurt, but you don't want to damage the roots (they're pretty shallow) in an area of 3-4 ft diameter around any single plant. .... The large plants usually shade out competing weeds, so if yours are far enough apart to allow weed growth, it's probably OK to cultivate. (I dunno fer sure. My patch is dense enough to shade out competitors.)
 

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I believe that the roots all work together and tilling would damage that environment. And the root system. Causing the plant to not only produce but to repair its roots. When roots are devided it is usually recommended that a clean cut is better.
Are you trimming the yearly old growth ? That should remove half the growth.
Good luck.
 

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Are you trying to hold back growth, or cut back weeds?

If it's the latter, I'd suggest mulching the rows. If it's the latter, then Olhomestead's suggestion to make clean cuts seems best.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Rows are about 5 or 6 ft apart. I want to get rid of all the suckers popping up. What happens is the new suckers get thick and crowd out the fruit bearing plants. They all compete and grow to about 8 ft high with little fruit! Want the energy to go to fruit, not excessive growth.

l’m ready to plow the whole works under if I can not get a decent amount of fruit!
 
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It won't hurt them. I plant veggies between my rows, they are probably 6ft apart. Always digging in there and disturbing stuff. It probably does mess with the root structure which is GOOD...keeps the invasive things where they belong! I really don't think you will hurt them by trimming their hooves, lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was mulching with massive amounts of leaves between rows. But that seemed to over-fertilize them and made them grow to such excessive heights. Maybe what I will do is use my mini-tiller at a shallow depth to just take out the suckers and other weeds at the surface level.
 

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I was mulching with massive amounts of leaves between rows. But that seemed to over-fertilize them and made them grow to such excessive heights. Maybe what I will do is use my mini-tiller at a shallow depth to just take out the suckers and other weeds at the surface level.
Lol I wouldn't go easy on them if they are trying to take over the world!
 

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Rows are about 5 or 6 ft apart. I want to get rid of all the suckers popping up. What happens is the new suckers get thick and crowd out the fruit bearing plants. They all compete and grow to about 8 ft high with little fruit! Want the energy to go to fruit, not excessive growth.

l’m ready to plow the whole works under if I can not get a decent amount of fruit!
Don't they produce on second year canes? The suckers growing like weeds the first summer should be fruitful the next year.
 

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Yes, this years new canes are next years fruiting canes. Some varieties of raspberries have the capability of taking over neighborhoods if their growth isn't slowed a bit. This might be the problem. Too many new canes make it difficult to get to the fruit on the older canes. If you can't get to the fruit the plants are worthless in the garden.

I would cut the excess canes at ground level with pruning shears but that's just me.
 

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I'm dealing with the same issue, I just cut them off maybe trying laying some heavy cardboard between the rows.
I believe you may have an inballance in your soil. Have you checked the ph? I put wood ash on our raspberries. And use 8-32-16 fertilizer. Berries also need lots of water. Kinda sounds like the berries are growing good with just a couple adjustments.
Proper ph to allow the plants to absorb the trace nutrients in the ground. And plant food, water.
You may be right about starting over though. If you have a variety of berry that just doesn't have good traits you may be further ahead.
I'd try the easy stuff first, can't hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I will get out there and at least pull up all the canes that will not be for next year. And thin the ones within the rows out good. I think that was my problem. The next-year canes were just too numerous and I only thinned them after the season. This year I will thin right from the get-go. And just hack down, pull up, or till out all those canes between the rows. If that doesn't work, I will be clearing them all out - they are taking up not only a lot of my time but precious garden space. For about $5 or $10, I could have bought all the berries I picked last year!

I already got rid of one row last year to make more garden space. Maybe with less to take care of I can do better overall.
 
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I know people who dig up these suckers and sell them. That way you're not disturbing as much of the roots as tilling and making some money back.
 

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Step by step, year by year.

How To Train and Prune Black Raspberries | Tenth Acre Farm

The early spring pruning gets rid of old dead canes that have already fruited. The second cutting in fall makes this year's new canes grow out sideways (laterals) for more and bigger berries next summer. You don't need as many canes per plant as you do branches per cane. It is okay to root out the row middles, but the rows should be mulched and fertilized. (In the early spring with either balanced, or perhaps a fertilizer a little higher in Nitrogen to allow the heavy growth cycle--maybe a good handful around the hill just beyond the roots.)

geo
 

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Yeppers your right about just going n buying food. Usually cheaper, no labor, no time.
It's a whole lot more to me but that's another story. Having a hedge of fresh berries sitting there so I can go grab a handful n pitch em in my mouth. Or having them available for my kids n grandkids n neighbors also. Yeah costs me a couple hours in the garden, outside, doing something creative n useful.
Hey sorry man. Kinda got away from myself. I kinda like gardening.
I also like to have a couple cold beers around. Even the gardener needs watering
 
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