Tilapia for profit?

Discussion in 'Hydroponics / Aquaponics' started by Radams1265, Jun 16, 2016.

  1. Radams1265

    Radams1265 Well-Known Member

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    Past the whole Aquaponics, I'm looking at a local market wanting, fresh tilapia. I have had a couple customers ask about, fresh locally grown. Tilapia and I have wanted to see if I could expand to that market. My rabbit meat sells, like hot cakes. Can't keep a fryer for 2 days. If I'm lucky.
     
  2. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you have a small local market willing to pay a high price than the answer is yes you could make a profit. Anything larger bumps up against a low cost supply that makes profit making very hard.
     
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  3. chaossmurf

    chaossmurf Well-Known Member

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    youll never ever ever match the Asian mud-fish for price ---but then again their tilapia tastes like mud --fresh aquaponics tilapia doesn't taste anything at all the same --I truly hate fish ---I ONLY eat the fish plank from long john silvers ---and even I love fresh tilapia & the rest of my family who love seafood and fish --went nuts for it when we got some aquaponically grown local ---so its comparing mud to fresh yummy stuff ---totally a diferent deal
     
  4. Lady89

    Lady89 Well-Known Member

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    I have looked into this same idea some, but found that at least in my area there is just not enough interest for me to compete with the Asian imports
     
  5. chaossmurf

    chaossmurf Well-Known Member

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    you cannot compete with them --even if you tried to raise lousy muddy messes of fish --theyd win :(
    what you need to do is just raise it for yaself --then once systems up then give them one of your fish to eat themselves --theyl call you --if they eat it instead of tossing it away thinking its the same as their Asian mudd-fish
     
  6. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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    Aquaculture has a high cost to enter and it's nearly impossible to do it small. That said... I know a fella that sells 2-3 dozen trout a week at a market I attend for 10 bucks each. It's just one of the things he sells. Not a bad side business.
    It can be very profitable to grow species that do well in your area. Climate adjustment is very costly. In the far north. Look into Arctic Char or trout. In cooler regions go for Perch, walleye pike, and white bass. In warmer regions Catfish and stripped bass would do well. In warm areas go for prawns and Tilapia. Some other good species? Carp and Redear Sunfish.

    Use the climate you have for success. Plus folks know the taste of the local fish and are willing to pay extra for the home town flavor.
     
  7. Radams1265

    Radams1265 Well-Known Member

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    I have thought about perch, I hung out with a local perch farmer for a few months, a few years ago as a hand, learned a lot. But costs is up there but return is as well. But he does 10s of thousands of fish, but only really feed trains them and raises them to 3-4in and sells them to a local dealer who sells them for pond stocking. I would think there could be a decent return for aquaculturely grown perch if you could get a small stable supply of perch and sold to local bars for a Friday night fish fry.
     
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