Thought I'd Share Some Pics!

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Hog_Em_All, Aug 21, 2005.

  1. Hog_Em_All

    Hog_Em_All New Member

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  2. americanbulldog

    americanbulldog American Hunter

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    Hog_Em_All,
    I just had a couple questions for you. I am just asking because I don't know the answers about is normally done, etc. I have no idea about the right way to raise pigs so I am just trying to find out.
    Do you find that type of fence works without any trouble of the wild pigs getting out?
    Do you have any problems with the pigs digging or rooting their way out?
    I don't see any house for the pigs. Do they need one?
    How much time/effort does it take to try to keep the pen clean? I understand that they are pigs so I mean clean enough so that the pigs stay healthy.
    Do your pigs ever fight with each other? Do you need to take any steps to stop them?
    What type of pigs are those considered to be? I know you said one is Russian, but what are the rest?
    Thanks
     

  3. HogEmAll

    HogEmAll Well-Known Member

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    I use "Combination Panels". They're 16 feet long and 52 inches tall. The bottom 4 rows are close together to prevent smaller pigs from getting out. For fence posts, I use metal T-Posts that are 6.5 feet tall. I drive them into the ground untill only 1 inch is above the top of the fence. So far, this has been plenty. My hogs have never escaped, nore have they attempted to dig underneath. Be advised, however, that hogs captured in the wild, in other words Truly Wild Hogs, will more than likely get out of this kind of setup. For them, something sturdier is required, and I recomend that you use tin roofing on the bottom 2 feet of the fence. It prevents the hogs from seeing the outside, and mostly discourages them from trying to escape. For my hogs, however, my setup has worked flawlessly.

    I didn't build them a "house", per say, but they do have a covered shelter. This is also where their food trough is kept to keep it nice and dry. I don't know if wild hogs need a house, but I do plan on building one for this upcoming winter. Mind you, Florida winters are nowhere near as cold as up north, but I think a house would help shelter them from the cold wind. We do occasionally see wind-chills below freezing. If you build your pigs a house, be sure that it's big enough to accomodate ALL of them comfortably, and fill it with plenty of hay or pine straw.

    My pigs have chosen one corner of their enclosure as their "bathroom", so it's quite easy to go there with a rake and shovel every other day or so. Takes only a few minutes.

    Sure they do. My two boars especially. They're young, so most of it is "sparring". Their tusks haven't grown to dangerous lengths yet, but they do inflict minor cuts and such. I plan to seperate them soon, building each boar a 16x16 pen. Their aggression tends to get a little out of hand when one of the gilts is in heat, but other than that, it's tolerable.

    Indeed, the reddish-brown boar you see in two of the pictures is pure Russian. Chances are you won't find one of those just running around your local wilderness. The black hogs you see in the pictures are called "Piney Woods Rooters". They're basicly a feral hog, decending from various domestic lines that have managed to escape the farms and made their living in the wild. Their skin and hair darkens over the course of several generations, making them more suitable for exposure to the sun and blending in with the thick undergrowth of a forrest. Piney Woods are also very hardy pigs, shrugging off pestecides, worms, and diseases that domestic pigs suffer more freely from. I still give my hogs a dewormer every 2-3 months, though, just to be sure. But while a bad case of worms may kill a domestic hog, it seems, in my experience, that a feral hog can manage to live with them, even ridding themselves of the parasite at times.

    Oh yeah, the pictures only show a very small portion of the enclosure. I'm not sure how big the whole thing is, but they've got plenty of room to run around.
     
  4. americanbulldog

    americanbulldog American Hunter

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    Thanks for the information.
    If you have the chance I have just a couple more questions.
    When the fighting "gets out of hand" do you need to go in there and break it up or do they just settle down on their own?
    When you do put the boars in their own pen will you put the gilts in there with them? If you do what will happen when one of the boars has a gilt in heat and the other one doesn't? Will they try and smash their way out to get to the gilt?
    Thanks
     
  5. HogEmAll

    HogEmAll Well-Known Member

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    They always settle down on their own. Sometimes I walk in there and do my normal chores, like cleaning the water tub, and they settle right down. Sometimes, though, they keep right on fighting. So far, neither has made the other bleed, but I'm sure that once their tusks are more pronounced, serious injuries will result. That's why I'm going to seperate the two soon.

    The trick here is to not put two boars in seperate pens side-by-side. Put some distance between the two enclosures, or at least build a solid wall so they can't see eachother. I will only put a gilt or sow in there if I want piglets. I'll let her come into heat, then put her in with one of the boars for a few days. The other boar should be fine, but he may try to get out. That's why boars pens should be a little more sturdy.
     
  6. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the photos HogEmAll.I bet theyre enjoying the mud :) I could have told you that you were in Florida by the looks of your pigs. They're the typical FL wild pig. Hate to say it but you don't have a pure Russian there. His head doesn't have the phenotype.He's higher % than your other ones though. PUre Russians have small ears, short straight tails, long snouts, and have a buffalo type build. Would be interesting to see what the meat he produced will be though. Probably very tasty. Your piglets will get out of the bottom rows of combo panels unless they all have that lattice (doubt thelattice will last long once the sows are moms :) the piglets will learn to jump through and when they no longer fit through the bottom they'll go through the upper ones. They only weigh 2-3 pounds at birth, very teeny and very quick within a couple of days. Good luck with them.
     
  7. HogEmAll

    HogEmAll Well-Known Member

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    Tango, could you please show me a picture of what you consider to be a russian hog, then? :confused: Everyone that has seen him has refered to him as a russian boar. One guy saw him and told me that there are people seeling these things for $350 and up. Mostly to Hunt Clubs and Game Reserves. So I checked out a few magazines and found a place in central Florida that sells Pure Russians and Hybrid "Razorbacks". The going price for their russian piglets is $375, while the Hybrids are cheaper.

    Let me also point out the fact that he doesn't look much like his parents at this age. His parents have that bison-body, small ears and long snout. They also have long fur which is shed every summer. Trouble hasn't even grown his first coat fully. When I get a chance, I'll post some pictures of his parents. Untill then, please show me what you call a Russian Hog. :)
     
  8. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    The photos I have are on my desk computer which is in storage at present. I can try to locate some online for you. He looks Russian for sure- you can pick him out in a line up but the problem I see we are having more and more of (and not just with Russians but with everything from dogs to horses) is that people pick up on a name and regardless of genetics, use the name to describe what they see. Ask a southerner what a bulldog is or ask someone what a paint is and you'll see what I mean. I haven't tried to buy this year yet but last year when I was on a list to get a pure Russian boar from a preserve with zoo lines I was expecting to pay $900. $350 is what the hybrids were selling for. It is possible that the prices have gone down that much but those ears will not get smaller. He may come from high percentage parents but you can see the Spanish in him at a glance. This doens't mean anything really. You've got a nice boar there, one I'd be proud to include in my breeding program. I spoke with someone I know in Alabama and he confirmed what you said (or someone said, can't remember) people have been releasing Russians in Alabama. Bad news for dogs. Whether they are pure orhigh percentage like yours remains to be seen.
     
  9. MississippiSlim

    MississippiSlim Well-Known Member

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    I wish no one had ever turned any of the Russians loose in Mississippi! They have become such a problem here! You used to see Rooters around in the wild but less and less these days and more Russian blood. They tear up land, kill dogs and generally wreak havoc!

    Do you have a ready source for Rooters? I would love to introduce some back around home as it has been 20 years since I have seen any. Or at least feed a couple up as they are great eating!