This is a real bummer...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Maggie, Sep 21, 2005.

  1. Maggie

    Maggie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    About 4 or 5 years ago, we had a local handyman put a steel roof on our house. Last week on the tv show "Ask This Old House", my son saw a segment on venting a bathroom fan to the attic. Well, he told my hubby to check the vent in our attic, and hubby came down from the attic sick to his stomach. It wasn't because the fan was vented wrong, but--because the steel roof wasn't installed correctly, the whole ceiling/roof in the attic is rotting out. :eek: Last night he and a dear friend checked it out again, and they said it is NOT good. So, now we will have to call a roofing guy and get estimates on having the attic ceiling/roof fixed. The handyman who put on the steel roof is not bonded, insured, etc. He's just a guy 'everyone' around here says is a great handyman. :( I'm just hoping there's some way we can still use the steel roof when the lower part gets fixed. Apparently that will have to be taken off also. Not a good thing...Maggie
     
  2. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    I would see if the 'handyman' could fix the job right first. He isn't bonded, insured, or anything else, but he probably does depend on word of mouth in the local community. If he insists that there is nothing wrong, or if he wants to charge you again for a job that should have been done right the first time, go elsewhere, but make sure that everybody else in the area knows that he won't stand behind his work.
     

  3. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Remove the existing nail heads with a pair of clippers that look like horse hoof trimmers, then lift the metal up off the nail shafts. When you say installed wrong do you mean that the nails (screws) were mounted down in the flats rather than on the upper portion of the metal, its a very common mistake done by those whom do not know what they are doing. What type of shape is the metal? 5-V, corrigated, box beam, or other?
     
  4. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Did he not use firring strips under the metal with a full length ridge vent? I'm considering a steel roof, and am told the strips and ridge vent is a must,
     
  5. gspig

    gspig Well-Known Member

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    How the roof is mounted depends on the roofing system. The 5 rib metal common on barns, must be on furring strips. Air must be able to circulate on the underside of the panels to keep rust from occurring. Other systems may use some sort of mat or felt to control moisture. Did the installer vent the bathroom into the attic?
     
  6. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If the vent is into the attic space & venting moisture, that _could_ be 90% of your problems, and not so much the roof intall.... Just a thought, doesn't help you any. Sorry for the problems, not fun.

    --->Paul
     
  7. BackwoodsIdaho

    BackwoodsIdaho Well-Known Member

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    Installing metal roofing varies depending on the type of panel and the application. A blanket statement that 5 rib (or Ultra rib) must be on furring strips is wrong. It CAN be on furring strips, however, it can be installed on a plywood subbase with 40# roofing felt. Nails can be used but I wouldn't recommend it. The nails should be driven on the ribs. If you use neoprene washered screws, they go on the flat part of the panel not the rib. If you used standing seam roofing, then the screws used are truss screws with no washer and a flat head. They are hidden in the seams as each panel is clipped in place. It is really hard to screw up a metal roof installation. The typical places for leaks are in valleys and flashing around penetrations. I suspect either the bath vent was not vented properly or had a restriction/loop in the exhaust hose resulting in moisture being trapped in attic. If it were just the roof leaking, the damage would have been localized to that area and given the amount of water coming in, you should have had some apparent water damage to your ceiling.

    If you pull the roof, you can save the panels, just unscrew the screws or cut the nails and stack in the order it comes off. Get new screws for installation. I pulled half our standing seam roof last summer when I added on two bedrooms. Not fun but not hard either.

    jim
     
  8. Maggie

    Maggie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I talked to my hubby and son, and they both said the steel roof was installed right over the shingles. He guy did NOT put anything down when he put the steel roof on. He just laid it on top of the existing shingles and screwed it in. Hubby says you can see the screws he put in the steel right through the ceiling in the attic. Oh yeah, just a quick note re. the bathroom fan; there isn't a shower in this bathroom, just a toilet and a sink. Also, we DID have some seeping of water in a few of our rooms in the house. :help: Wow, now we only have to wait, and wait, ... for a few return phone calls from a couple of roofing guys. (who will be bonded, insured, etc. by the way) Thanks, Maggie