This Farmer Amazed Me!! Root Cellar

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by RockyRooster, Jun 22, 2006.

  1. Kazahleenah

    Kazahleenah Disgruntled citizen

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    That is awsome!!!

    Kaza
     

  2. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    sorta cool, but a pain to access it seems to me.
     
  3. sagecreek

    sagecreek Well-Known Member

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    I never have that kind of luck! :baby04: Very cool!

    Scott
     
  4. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My mom still grew a BIG garden when she was 90. Dad was 87. Were they to have this ingenious celler at their disposal, how would they get in and out of it carrying nothing, much less carrying vegetable in and out of it. THeres a celler/cave outside by the house, that has steps in it, and they hadnt used it because they finally got to where they couldnt handle steps. My point is, assuming we all want to die on our places, why build somthing that isnt old age friendly. Here in Okla, the barns is FAR from the house. A guy in church said he built his barn when middle age. He said when he was young he could run to it, then he had to drive to it, now, he says he gets tired just looking at it. I want to build a above ground root celler, but I dont know if it can be done here in Okla. My barn is going to be around 50ft from the house , or less. The chicken houses, and brooder houses are CLOSE also to the house,m So I can keep up keeping up the chores when im old. I know that sooner or later we all got to quit, but I want to die tryin.
     
  5. jessin

    jessin Well-Known Member

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  6. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    I know of one built like that they put a stairwell down to and used a concrete saw to cut an opening in the side of the tank. It was done in the middle '70s.
     
  7. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Now that would be handy... I just couldn't imagine trying to climb the latter with you hands full of fruits or veggies.
     
  8. RockyRooster

    RockyRooster Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm, good advice there. Now I have to add another thought to my spreadsheet of what to do next and how. This one will be entitled "Is it readily available and functional for old age." :nerd:
     
  9. missysid

    missysid Well-Known Member

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    I agree not the easiest to access. But if you move to a location with one built like this I guess you could just use a bucket and rope to lower your bounty to the bottom then climb down yourself after securing the rope to the top of the tank to pull the bucket out.

    Not easy but it would work.
     
  10. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That is pretty ingenious!

    For accessibility, I'm wondering if a spiral stair could be installed... You could put in a narrow stair along the sides, and would not lose too much space if you installed shelving under the stairs... hm. 4.5 x 8.5... guess it would be tight, but :shrug: First part of the stair along the 8' side, then a turn to the 4' side? And just wide enough to walk down... 24"wide?

    I dunno. Just thinkin'.

    Pony!
     
  11. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My parents have an 8*8*8 ft root cellar built into a steep hill (it came with the house) it has power/vent and stays above freezing in winter (mtns of Maine) and about 50 midsummer.

    The floor is sand (the soil up there is very sandy) the rest is poured concrete...and when it was poured rebar was left sticking out for adjustable shelving...

    It has a regular exterior wood door and then a door from a refrigeration unit on outside.

    Access is an issue as the house sits on top of the 25 ft hill but dad goes down with snowmobile....depending on wind direction sometimes is has to be shovelled a bit...but it sets into the hill so its not a lot of snow.

    There are rosebushes at the entrance and on top where it vents is an herb garden....the vegetable garden is just about 20ft from root cellar entrance...

    Here's the garden taken from top of hill... bottom right hand corner is where root cellar goes into the hill

    http://s31.photobucket.com/albums/c395/mpillow/?action=view&current=moose2.jpg
     
  12. albionjessica

    albionjessica Hiccoughs after eating

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    That was built back in '83 or earlier according to the article. I'd like to know how it's held up, and if it was still useable (as other people have mentioned) as he gets older.
     
  13. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    Are there any precautions you should take as far as gasses go, even just carbon dioxide? Carbon dioxide isn't poisonous, but you can drown in it. I would think it would be easier to ventilate a root cellar that is built into a hill or at least has a stairwell down to it. I am not sure if ventilate is entirely the correct term either as a lot of it simply has to do with allowing oxygen and carbon-dioxide to diffuse in and out. I should think wide cellar door and open stairwells are much more effective this way. I am always keen on trying new ideas, but you always have to be on the lookout for why things have always been done a certain way and not others.

    Perhaps you could have a vent that goes down to the bottom and blow some fresh air down there to push the stale air out if you haven't been down in a while. The air itself doesn't actually hold a lot of heat so it would cool down again fairly quickly even in summer, though you would get condensation. If you change the air in a 40degF 8'x8'x8' room with 80degF outside air you will only be adding about 400 BTU of heat and it would cool down again cery quickly. A small bathroom fan at 30cfm would do the job in about 20 minutes. The septic tank guy can probably offer some good advice in this regard also.

    Also maybe two larger than usual vents, like on a ship, with cowls or dorades pointing into and away from the prevailing wind. I don't think you would gain much heat, but it might be enough to keep the air reasonably fresh. Use something cheaper of course, unless you want to pay for that nautical look. :)

    http://www.cyber-bridge-marine.com/cool-n-dry-dorades-plastimo.html
     
  14. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    vents are 6" pvc pipe with elbow on top to keep the rain out as well as screening on the end w/ rubber bands....good airflow also controls humidity and different fruits/vegies do best in higher/lower humidity levels.......
     
  15. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    That's the ticket. Thanks.