Thinking of getting a pygmy

Discussion in 'Goats' started by SDjulieinSC, Jul 3, 2006.

  1. SDjulieinSC

    SDjulieinSC Well-Known Member

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    How old should it be? A co -worker has a family member who had new one born last Friday. They said that I could take it home in 1 week after it was born and bottle feed it. I work an 8-5 job and am pretty sure that it won't be able to go that long between feedings at that age. How long should I leave it with it's mother? Will it still be "people friendly" if I wait?
    I also need to know what I need to do as far as shots and wormings. Is it like a puppy and needs a series of vaccinations at first then yearly boosters?
    Any help would be great! I'm a goat dummy.....
     
  2. gottahaveagoat

    gottahaveagoat Well-Known Member

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    I would wait at least 6 weeks. You will also need 2 since they are a herd animal it will cry ALL the time if it does not have a friend. Some say another animal will work sometimes but I would not want to chance it. I found if you spend time with them they turn out to be very friendly. I follow a Vacination schedule that you can find at www.bowlerfarms.com Hope this helps you.
     

  3. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Hi!
    I've got pygmies, and none of them have ever been bottle fed. Dam-raised kids are nice enough if they are well socialized with people where they are coming from and after they go to thier new home. Bring treats of all kinds when you go and visit! Early socialization is key, before they are old enough to realize you might be a threat.
    I highly reccomend pygmies as a pet. Check out my pygmy website at : www.freewebs.com/mygoats/ Hope it helps a little; I also have tons of links to excellent goat websites as well on my homepage. :)
     
  4. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    I bottle feed all my goats including the Pygmies. If you are going to bottle feed pull the kid right away. A kid that has been on it's mom for a week is not going to want a bottle. By 1 week old I have mine on 2 bottles a day. I have never had any problems with them. I do them the same as the dairy kids, just not as much milk at a time.
    I agree that you should get at least 2. THey are herd animals & get very lonely without a buddy.
     
  5. trob1

    trob1 Well-Known Member

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    I have pygmies also and do not bottlefeed. My dams love their babies from the moment they are born and cannot imagine taking them away and giving them a bottle. They learn so much from their mothers on how to live in a herd. My babies are all over me and love to be held. If you do decide to get one and bottle feed it two is better. Here is the schedule most people with pygmies use.

    1 day to 1 week - 5 bottles a day with 1 to 3 oz each
    2 to 3 weeks - 4 bottles a day with 4 to 5 oz each
    4 to 5 weeks - 3 bottles a day with 5 to 6 oz each
    6 to 7 weeks - 2 bottles a day with 8 to 10 oz each
    8 to 10 weeks - 1 bottle a day with diluted milk by adding water to milk and decrease about so they are weaned by 10 weeks of age.

    I can't imagine a pygmy goat being feed only 2 bottles a day at 1 week of age and doing very well. They need small amounts many times a day. They can be pulled at one week old but bear in mind it will have to get really hungry to take a bottle and you will need to be persistant.
     
  6. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    Well, I have raised them for close to 20 years & I can assure you, they do fine that way.
     
  7. trob1

    trob1 Well-Known Member

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    You are the only person I have heard of that does it this way ! I am glad it works for you but I wouldnt do it. A human baby could probubly live on being feed 2 bottles a day at 1 week old too but I dont think they would thrive as well either. Baby goats are babies and need to be treated that way and fed often. I would hope anyone who is told they can feed just twice a day at one week will do their homework and research what is BEST for a baby goat at that age. With my goats I always want to do what is best for them to thrive and not just what I can get by with.
     
  8. Ramblin Acres

    Ramblin Acres Well-Known Member

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    Sd,
    If you work a 8-5 job then I would not take on a week old kid as they do need to be fed small amounts several times a day. Kids can be very friendly dam raised.Is the people you are getting her from handle their goats daily?You can leave it on the mom until it would need to be fed only twice a day and then bottle feed it that way.We have pulled our kids off the mom sometimes when they have been sold and started to bottle feed them, it can be hard to get them to latch on but they will do it you just have to be forceful.

    As far as vaccinations the breeder should do their first det of Cd & T. I always sell mine all ready they have had both sets of cd&t and have been dewormed.Once you are done with the first 2 cd&t vaccinations then they only need to be vaccinated once a year and it is a pretty cheap vaccine.I have my goats on a rotational deworming program along with my horses.I use ivomec spring and fall and in between I use whatever horse wormer I bought so it could be panacur, safegaurd, ivermectin, strongid,ect.

    If you do have a horse or another herd type animal the goat will be fine and you don't neccesary have to have two but it is always nice to have a pair of goats.On another note tho is what type of fencing do you have?Also are you planning on having horns or dehorning?

    Good luck
     
  9. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    It's rather silly to compare human babies to livestock. I love my goats, but they are livestock & I do not feed them & coddle them like I do my human babies. They are animals. I know several people that raise them on 2 bottles a day, where do you think I learned it from? I have always sold nice healthy kids & have not had any trouble. My calves are raised the same way, as most dairies do it. She asked about feeding them a bottle & you gave your opinion. I also wanted to let her know that it can be done differently than the way you do it. I am sure the majority of people feed more often, but you do not have too.
     
  10. SDjulieinSC

    SDjulieinSC Well-Known Member

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    uh oh...didn't think about horns...can my vet take care of that?
    Once she is a bit bigger I may put her in a pen with my pig from time to time. It is hog wire with a strand of barb wire along the top. I had a nubian/boer (sp) and a pygmy/x in there for a while with no problems. I would worry about horns getting stuck in the fence, other wise I wouldn't really care either way (should I?).
    I think that I will keep her in a smaller chain link pen for a while, may even try her out in the back yard with the rat terriers if I can get everyone to play nice.
    Thank you all for sharing your knowledge! Don't stop now....
     
  11. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    A vet should be able to do horns, but it would be better to find a breeder to do them. You would probably have better luck.
    I would NOT put her in a pen with a pig. Pigs can & do kill goats. They eat meat afterall. I have had pigs kill chickens & eat them. The goat would also not have clean water if she is in a pen with a pig.
     
  12. trob1

    trob1 Well-Known Member

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    I really wasnt comparing treating a baby goat to a baby human sorry it sounded like it. As I said they sould be treated like babies, baby goats that is. Yes your opinion is your opinion and mine is mine and someone should do alot of reading on the subject and then decide for themselves. As I said I am glad it works for you but not for me. I let the goat moms feed the babies and I coddle and love on them to make them tame and it is working like a charm. Instead of spending my time fixing bottles I sit down and love on my babies. But if I had to bottlefeed then I would mimick the natural way of feeding as much as I could small and often meals Everyone is different and that is what makes the world a fun place.
     
  13. SDjulieinSC

    SDjulieinSC Well-Known Member

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    The pig pen is just a now and then kinda of thing. The pig has lived with goats/a horse/ a donkey and 2 mini horses and has never had a problem. Heck he won't even eat a banana if I don't peel it for him!! But I had not planned on making that yard her full time hang out and I promise to supervise!
    So if I do decide to let her stay with mama, 6 weeks is when she can come home with me? She will be able to eat regular goat food then? Puppy chow for kids?!!
    I'm not sure what vax the "breeder" will do. I tried to call him this AM but got no answer. If he has not done the horn deed will it be too old when I take her home?
    I hope these questions don't seem too stupid..I just want to do this right. When I worked for the vet I saw very few sick goats get better. I would rather prevent problems now than try to fix them later.
     
  14. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    I do not wean before 12 weeks. 6 weeks is way too young to be weaned in my opinion. The very least should be 8 weeks. The horns should really be done by 2 weeks of age. Pygmies can go a little longer, but I wouldn't wait 8 weeks. I always did mine by 2 weeks of age.
    You are correct on sick goats. It seems that once they get sick it is often too late to save them. Prevention is a biggie with goats.
     
  15. SDjulieinSC

    SDjulieinSC Well-Known Member

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    So Wendy what happens if the breeder does not do the horns? Tell me the reasons for having them done or not. A safety issue mostly? Mine and hers. I think I may be making a mountain out of mole hill with all of this.I should have NEVER read the list of poison plants!!
    If I am able to lever her with the mom for 8/12 weeks she can eat regular goat food then?
    Maybe I should just get a hamster........
     
  16. trixiwick

    trixiwick bunny slave

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    About the horns - we let them keep 'em, but might not do so if they were larger goats who could cause bigger trouble with them. In the plus column, horns are their way of releasing heat in the summer, plus they can use them against predators. In the minus column, they can use them to be aggressive with humans and each other, plus apparently they can get them caught in fences (neither has ever really happened with ours, though).

    I agree with the folks who think it's best to let the kid stay with their mom for awhile. Bottle-feeding is such a pain. By eight weeks, the kid should be eating plenty of hay as well as milk, and it can be safely weaned at that point. My dam-raised kids are so friendly you can't keep 'em off your lap. It all depends on what their interaction with humans has been like.

    In the meantime, put up a good, sturdy fence. Goats, especially pygmys, love to escape!
     
  17. Ramblin Acres

    Ramblin Acres Well-Known Member

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    I have noticed that doeling pygmies tend to go longer before they get a nice stub to dehorn,we have a 4 week old that is just now getting her horns in.While most breeders do their own dehorning,I pay my vet to castrate and dehorn my goats as it is way easier on them to be sedated thru the procedure we also do our tatooing at that time too. I like mine dehorned just for the fence sake we have had several goats get their head stuck and sometimes they may have been like that for awhile and then they are very vulnarable to dogs on the opposite side of the fence. You can however run a strand of electric about 2-3 feet high from the bottom of your fence and this will keep the goats off.If you have good sturdy fencing then you shouldn't have to worry about the escape artist.We have never had an escape artist only when we had open the gate and they sneaked out.

    By the time she is 8/12 weeks she should be on grain and hay and should be fine and you will not need to bottle feed at all.The longer they can stay with mom the healthier they are.

    I feel a good honest breeder will help educate you about your goat and the proper care.Look at all of his nannies do they appear to be in good body condition,have their feet trimmed?Does he vaccinate his nannies a month before they freshen(your kids will be healthier if this is done)? If he/she take poor care of his animals then I would stay clear.When my kids leave my farm they are dehorned & castrated(unless agreed upon prior to vet visit) vaccinated and have had their feet trimmed for the first time and have been dewormed plus ALL of my goats are on the same worming and vaccinating schedule.

    Just some thoughts for ya...
     
  18. SDjulieinSC

    SDjulieinSC Well-Known Member

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    I talked to the goat man this AM. He said that the bottle kid he is raising is being fed 2x a day. He feels that mine would be fine doing the same. I however, think I would feel better if she was eating several times a day.
    I decided that I would not get her this early if I could not figure out some way to get her fed while I am at work. I think he would rather not keep her the full six or eight weeks it would take to wean her.
    I can't keep her at my office so I thought I was out of luck. As a last ditch effort I asked the business next door if I could stash her there during the day and he said YES!! One hurdle down. I think I'm going to go for it.
    I am going to try to get out to his place tomorrow to check things out....