Things I have learned since moving

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by DayBird, Mar 15, 2005.

  1. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Always gravel your newly graded red mud driveway before trying to drive on it.

    Always put up a mailbox with your house numbers on it before expecting to receive a check in the mail.

    Always dig a drainage ditch before your mobile home is delivered.

    Make sure you know where the septic tank is.

    Get a gun to shoot the dogs that killed your rabbits.

    Never plug an electric fence charger into a ground fault current interupter (GFCI) outlet. It trips the breaker after the first zap.

    Don't burn your cardboard moving boxes on a windy day.

    Always make sure your water hose will reach your burn pile before you strike a match.

    Don't push your wife under the house to install the drain lines. She won't like red mud in her nose.

    Have plenty of chocolate available for the angry wife and the screaming 4 year old.

    Make friends with at least one set of neighbors. Hope they side with you when the dogs kill your rabbits.

    Make sure you have a cell phone with good reception where you will be living since you may have to wait two weeks to have a land line hooked up.

    Never rely on family to help you move.
     
  2. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    LOL...sounds like the move has been a little rough. Sure hope things settle down soon and get better for you!

    We had to put a mailbox up BEFORE we could get a building permit. So there was a mailbox at the road and no house for over a year!

    And if it only takes you two weeks to get your phone hooked up, consider yourself very lucky! It took us two months for the phone...and three months to get power lines run to the house! The builders had to use generators to build the house because of the problems delaying the power lines.
     

  3. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    There's nothing like jumping right on into the deep end, is there?
     
  4. crashy

    crashy chickaholic goddess

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    LOL one day you WIll look back and laugh those will be great memories!!! Every one has a few stories like that thanks for sharing :haha: But the dog killing your bunnies is NOT funny :waa: hopefully you will get to the bottom of that soon.
     
  5. Jan Doling

    Jan Doling Well-Known Member

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    But the move was still worth it, right? Stuff happens no matter where you're at...you may as well have it happen where you excited about being.
     
  6. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    Ah Daybird,, been there done that 5 months ago.

    Might want to add,, chase any Elk off your place before someone cuts your fence, other wise you will have even more work to do.

    Hope you do enjoy your new place Daybird. Even with the few things that have gone on here,, I love the new place.
    Still lots and lots of work, but we will get there sooner or later.
     
  7. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I have loved every moment of it except those spent chasing dogs at 2am.

    There's still a whole lot to do. I just have to wait to have the money to do it. Things are great and liveable, but not exactly the way I want them to be.

    Let's see:
    $200 for a front porch with actual steps so we can quit walking in the mud and climbing concrete blocks to get in.
    $300 for some gravel for the driveway...probably more.
    $500 to move the bird house so I can get them out of the chicken coop.
    $500 for a survey before we can put up a fence.
    "$God only knows how much" to actually get a fence put up.

    I'm a handy kinda guy. It's been years since I owned any dirt that I could do with what I wanted and I'm loving the fact that I can do things for myself without asking permission from a landlord, but the task of putting up a fence by myself is worrying. Would you think less of me if I paid to have it done? :rolleyes:
     
  8. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    A lot of that sounds REALLY familiar.

    I know one thing...I will NEVER help another person move*. None of the dozens of people I helped move over the years helped me move. Really made me mad. Standard answers are now:
    No, I will not help you move.
    No, you cannot borrow my truck, hand truck, refrigerator mover etc. to move.

    And ya gotta to have a gun to kill stray dogs and varmints if you wanna raise animals.


    *cute single girls or people with cute single daughters are exempt. Pretty much any female who asks "Pleeeeeaaaaase?" in that sweet female way is exempt. A weakness with me. I just can't help it and it has caused me no end of problems I assure you.
     
  9. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Daybird, if you can afford to have someone else do the fence then go for it! I sure wouldn't think any less of you.

    I just bought materials for fencing off another pasture. I about fell over at the checkout. Things never do get cheaper, do they? I haven't bought the hot wire yet, couldn't afford it after buying the t-posts, field fence, and corner posts. At least we already own the charger I'm going to use...
     
  10. SkyOne

    SkyOne Active Member

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    Boy does this bring back memories. Five years ago we bought this land. Lived a year in a travel trailer, hubby, me, four cats, and two dogs. Cleared the land ourselves. Had to chase the wolves away from the trailer at night. Not coyotes but real wolves. Finally got road in and doublewide delivered. Found that the wolves were denned up on the corner area where we wanted to put the house. That was a fun time. Watched the newspapers and got all the free chainlink fences we could find. Most was six foot which we cut in half and put along the bottom of the regular fence. That stopped the wolves, coyotes and dogs from running through our place. We now have our pasture established and our Jersey cows in the pasture with calves. Last year we had coyotes at our back fence again and an old rancher told me to get cheap bisquits, cook them up, fry up some bacon to rub the bisquits in the grease, and put in a couple of alkaselsor (sp?) tables. Said dogs, wolves, and coyotes can't belch off the gas and die. Haven't tried it but would if I have to. We live close to town so there are always the dogs. Peoples dogs may stay home during the day but my quess is that is because they are out running all night. Good luck with your rabbits. Sky
     
  11. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    AND you may soon learn to put geo fabric under that gravel.
     
  12. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    I appreciate the humor in your post BUT, as a long-time country boy, I REALLY resent your notion to shoot the neighbors dogs.
    We REALLY resent folks who move in nearby then want to change reality to suit their notions of a perfect world.

     
  13. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    As a long time country girl who has lost more stock to 'pets' than to wild predators, I say give the owners one warning to keep their dogs off your property, then do whatever it takes to protect your livestock. I REALLY resent people who don't take the responsibility to control their pets. :no:

    Daybird, sounds like you're getting broken in really well! Things will heal, though. :p You're off to a great start! Congratulations!! :D


    Meg
     
  14. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    As a long time country boy, I am sure you keep your dogs off your neighbors property and properly confined. Because as a long time country boy you have probably had someone elses dogs kill your livestock. And as a longtime country boy I am sure you would agree that good fences make good neighbors.
     
  15. lacyj

    lacyj Well-Known Member

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    Having moved to bare land, I can relate. One thing that I wood warn about is: Don't use cheap blue plastic tarps to protect anything. They may last for one or two rainy, windy nights, but that's it! We lost soooooooo much stuff because of those hardware store deals. The heavy duty silver ones work a bit better, usually last one season.
     
  16. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I learned during our last move that those blue tarps are worthless. I guess if I had done it again, I wouldn't have moved until I had a fence up. Or at least more money saved to buy materials with... but the step-brother that bought our old trailer wanted us out so he and his bride could move in.

    The driveway threw me for a loop. It was nicely graveled and driveable before the grading was done to bring the new home in. It had a rut down one side but was still driveable. They said it would cause problems with the trailer frame so the grading had to be done. The house was brought in the same day the driveway was graded down and all the gravel pushed to where the house now sits. If I didn't have to worry about buying gravel, I could go ahead with what was planned.
     
  17. .netDude

    .netDude Well-Known Member

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    lol, moving this weekend (woohoo!!) take everything said with heed!
     
  18. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    If you don't want your dog shot then keep it on your own property. Let your dog run loose and kill stock then don't be surprised if he doesn't come home. That is just common courtesy around here. My neighbors know that if my dog is on their property killing stock then they should by all means shoot him. I wouldn't hold it against them at all. In fact it would save me from having to do it myself. I won't have a stock killing dog.

    People that let their dogs run loose are persona non grata around here. It just isn't done. Town scum that but a 1/4 acre and drag in a rotting trailer are usually the worst offenders. We don't get them around here, but some folks I know are plagued with city people moving to the country and they are notoriously bad about letting their dogs run loose on other peoples land and then get their panties in a bunch when somebody shoots them. The same ones that female dog about chickens, tractors and other country things disturbing them. They thought they lived in the country now so they could let their dogs frolic and run free across the rolling green hills. Rolling green hills they dodn't own and the frolicking and running free usually means killing stock or otherwise making themselves a nuisance.
     
  19. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is stock country down here in southern Mo...you let your dogs run and they won't come home. When we first came here we told a neighbor that his dog was constantly down in our sheep field and we wished he would keep him home...he went out and shot the dog then and there !!! We came around to the shoot shovel and shut up solution quickly raising sheep. It pains us to do this but our stock is our livelihood. New neighbors have moved in about a half a mile away and I fear they will be soon loosing two beautiful German Shepards that run the roads...know most of our neighbors are quicker than us to shoot. Our dogs are house dogs and the yard is chain-link fenced...I KNOW they'd run after stock since they are Corgis...without the fence they'd be blobs on the road in one day. Only leave the yard on a leash. Responsibily starts at home. DEE
     
  20. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

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    I've lived in the country all my life. I was raised in a place where you could lie down in the middle of a public road, and take a nap. I was born in a place that had open range, and stock ran free.

    Let me give you some advice:

    If you decide to shoot a man's dog, be aware of the consequences.

    1. You have just committed an illegal act. Unless YOU, not your stock, is in imminent danger, no leash law gives you the right to shoot an unleashed domestic animal. That right is privy to the Sheriif, his deputies, and the animal control officer of the county.

    2. One thing to keep in mind, is that on the rural route, most people own a gun, just like you do. They will use it, just like you will. This can make for some nasty situtations.

    3. People have been shot and killed, and their houses burned down, over something so simple as the argument over ownership of a pig. It is best to avoid violence, if at all possible.

    A cup of coffee with your neighbor, and a front porch discussion, work wonders. If the problem continues, involve your Sheriff's Department, or seek legal recourse.

    A hen house full of chickens, a hutch of rabbits, a yearling in the field can all be replaced, and hurt feelings can be smoothed over. But once certain lines are crossed, you might wind up living next to somebody for forty years, that would stand at the fenceline and clap, while your house burned down....