the value of claiming pens

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by len, Jan 13, 2005.

  1. len

    len Well-Known Member

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    central Ontario
    learned again this morning just how valuable claiming pens are...

    Found a gal this morning in the loafing barn with tripletts. This is her second lambing but she was beside herself trying to keep track of three lambs and stamping her foot at me. She followed right along as I carried her babies into the barn and put them in a claiming pen. I gave her water and a bit of hay then left them alone for 20 minutes while I did other chores. When I returned she had calmed down and stood easily while I got her babies 'plugged in'. I know it's important that the lambs suck as soon as possible but I find it a lot easier on the shepherd and the sheep when they have had a few minutes together in a quiet safe spot.
     
  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I like them too but have met a few who simply lamb on pasture and their success is about the same as mine. tagging is a lot harder as is record keeping in a biggish flock, and tail docking and castration is more of a rodeo without pens. Some of my cheviots treated the lambing pens as mini race tracks, so I'm glad to see them (the sheep) gone! I dunno they're alot of work to set up tear down and store but I'm not about to switch. Another good reason to use them is pesty lamb stealing mums who aren't yet mums, but would end up with 30 babies to rear if it was up to them.
     

  3. len

    len Well-Known Member

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    I had two ewes lamb at the same time last spring in a fence corner. Both had twins (I think) but the older ewe was convinced all 4 were hers. Took a bit of switching around to see who wanted who. Worked out OK in the end. :)
     
  4. kabri

    kabri Almst livin the good life

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    We always let our girls lamb where they want, then as you did, move the lambs and mother into their "jug" for 3 days. It sure seems to help the ewe get some rest without chasing her lamb(s) all over! We've been using hog pannels in a corner area, that seems to work out well for us and not too much time to put them up. Sure makes it easier to keep an eye on them the first few days, and also to do tails and any meds if they need it (ie we had a retained placenta last year so had to medicate the ewe.)

    Looking forward to lambing season, a little over a month away now!
     
  5. Lana

    Lana Active Member

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    Oregon
    We jug our ewes and lambs for a few day mainly to tag and band them.Our Cheviot ews are quite happy in the jug but our hair moms are much more nervous.i have friends who dont jug their hair sheep for this reason but i like to make sure mom and babe are doing well and banding is much easier when they are tiny.Lana