The scoop on hayfever?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Brad, Jul 13, 2004.

  1. Brad

    Brad Active Member

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    I read somewhere that "if you don't have hay fever, move to Missouri and you will have soon. Is the potential for hay fever an issue that should be considered before picking a place? Just how bad is it? I'd like to hear everyone's experiences or lack of them with hayfever.
     
  2. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    If Missouri doesn't do it for you ... move here! :haha:

    It's a matter of all the pollens and whanot in the air. I'd much rather have hay fever from allergic reactions to pollens and dust and mold than that awful yelch from pollutants.

    :) And yes, it is very bad throughout this part of the country.
     



  3. Where is here countrygrrrl? Hey how long does the hay fever season last and what do you do about it? Do you just suffer or take something?
     
  4. Brad

    Brad Active Member

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    Oops this is me Brad above. Sorry.
     
  5. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    I'm in far northeastern Oklahoma, right next to Arkansas (well, maybe 20 miles away) and fairly close to SW Missouri.

    Hay fever season (for me) starts the minute the pollen starts, which is usually (for me) end of February to mid-March --- and it lasts til the first good freeze. !!

    I take Benadryl every night during this time. It's the only thing that has worked for me. Last summer, I stopped taking the Benadry --- I'd NEVER really been too faithful about it --- and I fell asleep on the sofa with the windows open and woke up going into anaphlactic (sp???) shock (hives, throat swelling up) --- so I am now faithful about my Benadryl every night til the first freeze.

    It works. Makes me a bit dopey in the morning but hey. More reason for having an extra cup of coffee. :)

    I also take lots of baths and showers (to wash pollens off) and wash my face and hands a lot -- eg, this evening, i was out mowing and my face started itching from pollens --- I washed up the minute i was finished mowing. You have to be pretty rigorous about changing clothes, too, because the pollens will come inside on your clothing, as well.
     
  6. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    I'm in western Wa state and hay fever started for me and dh about 2 weeks ago and will continue till frost. The grass starts blooming and the eyes get red and the nose runs and my asthma hits full stride. UGH!

    I'm living on Claritin and Sudafed (my doctor said combining them was fine). I use a dust mask when I'm mowing (the darth-vader looking kind) and when I'm cleaning out the critter barn. Other than that, lots of showers (really just a quick rinse) and face washing, like countrygrrrl.

    I have to say, although my asthma is bothered by the grass pollen around here, I'm so much healthier than when I lived near Fresno, Ca. The smog around there in addition to the allergies meant I had to take 4 medications daily just to breathe. Now my asthma is controlled by 2 inhalers, sometimes just 1.
     
  7. Brad

    Brad Active Member

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    My story is that I used to live farther west on land covered with rare giant wild California Juniper trees. The trees were great, but for two months each winter they would produce pollen and I would have very very severe reactions to it. I mean really bad where I had to have injections just to function! My physician said the best thing was to move. So I moved quite a ways east deep into the desert where I have no smog and no hay fever symptoms. I suppose I'm dreaming if I think lusher lands wouldn't land me severe hay fever symptoms again.
     
  8. Laura

    Laura Well-Known Member

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    Evergreen pollen is a big problem for my mom, but never bothered me a bit and the grass doesn't bother mom.

    DH went off dairy products last year and it was the first time in his life that pollen didn't bother him. I head to the beach whenever I get overwhelmed by grass pollen.
     
  9. vicki in NW OH

    vicki in NW OH Well-Known Member

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    Ragweed grows something awful in Ohio, too. Enough to make the asthma really bad. I'm allergic to all the kinds of grass that grow here, too. Dust mites are the worst for me, though, and I get really tired of cleaning and wiping stuff down EVERY DAY! Dust mites are worse in hot, humid weather and that's the time of year for ragweed. So, imagine combining the two. I hate August!

    After a bad asthma attack, my doc told me to move to an elevation above 1500 feet. But, I figured there would be something there that I would become allergic to. High in a hut in the Alps sounds good to me, though. (Right, I wish)
     
  10. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    Of course, what matters is whether YOUR system is allergy prone. Look to your parents and grandparents. Do they react seasonally to pollen? grasses, trees?

    If no one in your history is allergic, you probably won't be. :)
     
  11. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I lived in the high desert in california and had bad allergies. Not enough to go to the doctor, but enough to make me miserable.

    I moved to the midwest and thought it would be awful, but they were better. After a few years here and since I work outside most of the time, my allergies are almost non-existant. Ragweed still bothers me some, but I take zyrtec very occassionally anymore, where I used to take something just about every day.


    There's more stuff growing out here, but it's so much damper that I don't think it flies around like it does in the dry desert.

    Jena
     
  12. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    Brad, I have fairly serious allergies --- but many people don't. And you very well might not have them here.

    And even though I have serious allergies here, I have worse problems other places. I lived in Colorado for a year or so, and was MISERABLE! :no: Lots of people in that area have very bad sinus problems because of the lack of humidity combined with (what I consider to be) strange allergies. Can't hardly drive through New Mexico!

    :no:

    I know people who have allergy shots here but I don't really like them. They wear off after a certain number of years and everyone i know who has had them is worse off once they wear off. I'd always been flakey about taking the Benadryl because I believe it builds up the system to a point to be exposed to the allergens. But like anything else, you just want to be careful about it - you don't want so much exposure that you get anaphlactic (sp????) shock or sinus infections, but you also don't want to totally isolate yourself.

    In addition, it's VERY lush where I live and there's stuff flying around all the time. I can usually tell what kind of allergy day it's going to be by going out in the morning and taking a deep breath - * can literally *smell* the things that cause me problems and my nose will react right off.

    My whole family has hideous allergies. Much worse than mine. And i can testify, they're really no reason not to move someplace. And they're MUCH MUCH better than pollution or (in my case) dry air.
     
  13. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Hayfever is when your body attacks itself. Due to a certain lack of logic, the body interprets the swelling and misery to the pollen, and so when the pollen shows up again the body is quicker to react. Over time, the body is VERY quick to react, and when it tries to attack the grains of pollen it is ALSO attacking the area immediately around it.....

    I have had the allergy shots, and I must say that I enjoyed a hayfever season that did not exist this year. Oh, I DID have to take a few hayfever pills, but I take a few out of season, as well.

    My sister was allergic to smog, and she grew up in California. Nasty health problems, there. I am allergic primarily to grass, and Californias' long growing season was bad for me, too.

    I am living on the Kansas-Missouri border, and I have less heyfever trouble than I did in California.
     
  14. Old Jack

    Old Jack Truth Seeker

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    ..........................

    When I moved here to WV I was told by a bee keeper that if you eat lots of native honey. It will help inoculate you against any allergy problems.
    I've been eating honey with peanut butter and on cereal for breakfast and so far the pollen hasn't bothered me.:D
     
  15. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    I've also heard that locally produced honey is a good antidote for hayfever & allergies.
     
  16. Old Jack

    Old Jack Truth Seeker

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    And, it's medicine that tastes good!
     
  17. FolioMark

    FolioMark In Remembrance

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    I dont think Im quite as allergic as countrygrl, but I also take Clarinex once the trees start to bud and through the spring but I can usually taper off in mid summer and then sometimes need some help in the fall when the leaves start to fall. I live most of the time in Illinois but I have a place in SW Missouri near Lebanon. Now for me, the weeks I spend in Missouri are sheer heaven compared to the ones in Illinois. My breathing clears up and my eyes dont itch and my sinus is clear and Im surrounded by Oak trees and grass and lots of brush all things Im supposed to be allergic to so go figure. I almost hate to go home to Illinois because within days, my sinus will start to bother me a bit. I really think it depends on your land and you system, but for me the air in Missouri is a real tonic. :p
     
  18. jane

    jane Guest

    HI There, I relocated from Lincoln Nebr to Bentonville Arkansas 2 years ago. Bentonville is in the Northwest corner..by Mo. Ks Olk. The allergies here are bad and they were bad where I came from but NOT THIS BAD. I started doing some reseach and Little Rock ranks as the number 2 worst place in the usa to live for asthma suffers. I found some other ranking for worst places to live with allergies and Tulsa, Little Rock, Memphis, Kansas City and St. Louis all topped the list. Spring was really hard and this year it's rained so much that the mold counts are sky high and have been for almost 3 months. This are has major beauty but it also has major pollen and mold. I would not recommed that anyone move here that has these problems because they will only get worse here. Just my 2 cents anyway:) Amy L.
     
  19. Jane

    Jane Guest

    P.S. Also when I was reseaching a read something saying that when you move to a new area you have to live there for 2 years before you will know for sure how the area will effect you.......so just taking a trip there for a few weeks and being okay doesn't mean you can move there and not suffer. Amy L.
     
  20. Brad

    Brad Active Member

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    Wow Jane what do you do about this? Take over the counter meds the whole season? Do they help or are you still having symptoms?

    It looks like there is a trade off in everything we do. Where I am, deep in a very dry desert, there is no mold and, except for a couple weeks in early spring after a rare winter rain, no pollen either. I had very severe hay fever symptoms before I moved farther east into the desert, so I can appreciate not having to deal with it anymore.

    But, nothing grows here either so there is no pasture for livestock like you guys back east have. Every bite of livestock food must be purchased. So do I want to have hayfever and enjoy the resources you guys have, or keep my nose dry and buy a lot of hay year round. ;)