The Old Old Plum Tree

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by NativeRose, Mar 1, 2005.

  1. NativeRose

    NativeRose Texas Country Grandma

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    There is an old plum tree growing on the backside of my dad's property. It must be about 80+ years old as it was here when my dad got the place from his uncle. About 80-100 years ago there were kin folks living back there. It was a small community and the only things left as a reminder are old hearth stones and pieces of old wood stoves and other buried treasures. :) The plum tree makes fruit later in the season than regular plum trees. I don't know what type plum it is but it doesn't look like regular wild plums around here. Does anyone know about this type of plum and how I could propigate it. I keep hoping a sprout will come up from a seed. I am planning to put a fence around it so the cattle won't damage it. It is really nice to know that something one of my relatives planted years ago is still alive.
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    To make sure you get the same fruit, you should propagate by cuttings. It would be great to keep it alive that way. Seeds may or may not have the same flavor as the original, depending on what the pollinator was.
     

  3. NativeRose

    NativeRose Texas Country Grandma

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    :) Thanks. I really don't have any idea how old this tree is. I am 53 and the homes back there were long gone before my time. The only home left was where my parents house now stands and I have an old stack of Life and other magazines that we found in the old house that date back to the 30's and 40's. So this tree is probably pretty old. I wonder how long do plum trees live? It doesn't produce fruit until late long after the other wild plums have quit producing.
     
  4. seaweed

    seaweed Well-Known Member

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    I found an old plum tree on an abandonned old farm near where we used to live. I think there is a housing estate over it all now. I took a cutting from it in what would be our autumn, stuck it in the ground in a flower bed & ignored it. In the spring, it got buds & then leaves. We moved out of the area to somewhere way colder so I dug it up & gave it to a friend of mine whose parents gardened & came from the area. I never heard if it got any fruit.

    Are you planning to take the plum tree some place else to grow ? It may be worth working out what is pollinating it if that is the case. If it profuces fruit late, does it flower late ? Is it a greengage type plum, a european or a japanese type plum do you know ? it could even be self fertile which would be good.

    I read somewhere that the early settlers where I live brought plum trees out with them as cuttings wrapped up in wet sacks. There may also be a place near you that collects & propogates heirloom fruit trees from your bio region who could help you.
     
  5. NativeRose

    NativeRose Texas Country Grandma

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    It is definitely self fertile. There are no plum trees near it. I am not planning to move it as it would probably kill it. I am going to see if a cutting will grow. I have also found a black haw (hawthorne) and a red haw in the same area. I would like to protect them as well. I am also collecting wild muscadine and hoping they will grow as well. This part of the state is being deforested at such a rapid rate that eventually there will be no wild fruit trees or vines.
     
  6. seaweed

    seaweed Well-Known Member

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    That is good that it is self fertile. I did not mean move the main tree, what I meant was did you plan on taking the baby to grow in a different place.