The neighbors kids came to visit last night

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by moopups, Jan 10, 2007.

  1. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Four in all, two girls (6 and 9), two boys (10 - 12?), they came before dark, the first questions were, does your mother know you are here? Do you have permission to be here, (trying to install the sense of respect that is so ignored these days)?

    They stated their mother knew and permission was granted. With that assurance we allow their presence. The chickens were let loose. It was comical as the two boys tried to catch chickens, the chickens obviously won that confrontation.

    I made it plain that the boys have much longer legs than chickens, it was to instill the sense that they would recognize that they were not noticeably Superior beings.

    The smallest girl did catch a chicken, but it did scratch her face, minorly. Tears followed, Fla Gal knelt down to reassure the girl that there was no blood or permate damage. She got rewarded by a massive hug.

    The second girl also made a massive hug (by child standards), apparently these children do not have much adult contact.

    Then the pair of turkeys were released, all the kids rushed to touch, pet, hug, and be delighted by such creatures within their grasp. I think the turkeys got more hugs that did Fla Gal.
     
  2. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well I'd say the kids do know what hugs are otherwise they would have been stand-offish.
    They may not get as many as they'd like but kids w/o affection often do not respond favorably.
    Its nice that you guys share the animals...and hugs!

    I think I average about 10 hugs per human kid per day....a few more for the Dad...then some from the goats, cat, dogs....its all good.
     

  3. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    My kids are at that age where they're too "grown up" for hugs. I try to sneak one in every few days and they recoil and shrug me off. Teenagers, pah!

    Sounds like those kids really enjoy visiting you, moopups :)
     
  4. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

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    Okay, so the kids have permission (so they say). Please do them a favor and go meet the parents, get their verbal okay. Just because a child gave you a hug doesn't mean they don't have 'much adult contact'.
     
  5. Burbsteader

    Burbsteader Well-Known Member

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    Do you know the parents? I was wondering if that is why you are able to come to such a conclusion after a single hug.

    Also, for your own sake, I would strongly suggest you get real permission from the parents, not just take the kids' word for it.
    You would demonstrate respect by contacting the parent before anything else. This would ensure that the kids understand that their parents' authority is respected by neighbors. :)

    Personally, there is no way on Earth I'd let kids chase my chickens. It is stressful to the chickens and teaches the kids that it is okay to chase them. Kids need to learn to respect the needs of animals too.
     
  6. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    I am on a first name basis with the parents, they trust us with their children completely. My observations are just my opinions. Yet I know there is something not quite right in that household. The father sits outside in the mornings waiting for his employer to pick him up, there is a lot of coughing and a shielded cigarette, I may be old but I am not blind or non perceptive.
     
  7. Peacock

    Peacock writing some wrongs Supporter

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    Of course you've got your gut feelings to go on -- but still, try to avoid jumping to conclusions. So what if the father gets a ride to work? And yes, I know what that "shielded cigarette" and coughing implies...but there are a lot of fairly responsible people who engage in that particular activity and still manage to be decent parents. JMHO.
     
  8. Macybaby

    Macybaby I love South Dakota Supporter

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    We have neighbor kids that like to come over. And the first thing we ask is "do you have your parents' permission" and we trust them to tell us the truth.

    We know the parents, and we've told them that it is ok for the kids to come over occasionally when we are home (they ride their bikes, only a few miles). Sometimes they help, sometimes they just get in the way. I expect to see them much more this summer, as nieghbors just got full custody within the last month.

    A few times the parents have called and asked if they were at our house, and the kids have learned there will be ** to pay if they come over without permission and lie about it. We started putting them to work (with parents' permission) so they don't wander over quite as often.

    And once in a while, we have let them "chase" the chickens. It's more in the nature of "can I pet a chicken" and ours are free range, so it's "you can try, but I don't know if they will let you" and then we watch the kids as they make a few attempts and they usually give up very soon. We don't let it get to the point where the chickens are being harrassed. After a time or two, the kids have learned that it's better to pet the dog or cats (those that will let them get close) than to want to pet the chickens. They have learned to let the animals come to them, not chase after them.

    Horses are only petting under supervision, and only with kids on one side of the fence and horses on the other.

    In our case, we bought our house from the Grandparents, so it's been a bit of a trial to teach the kids it isn't Grandma's house anymore, and it is not ok to walk in and wander around like it use to be.

    Cathy