The Fight Against Dementia

Discussion in 'Alternative Health' started by largentdepoche, Nov 5, 2006.

  1. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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    Seeing it firsthand, I'm very ahhhh about the possibilty of getting this later on. If I do, God willing I'll be one of the happy go lucky ones.

    I do know fish oil (omega fatty acids) are VERY important for your brain to prevent this. Vitamin D and E are also suggested to be very healthy. Drinking vegetable or fruit juice 3x a week is shown to reduce it also.

    Also you have to exercise your brain! (I think this is the only part of me getting the most exercise LOL!) Doing crossword puzzles or even playing video games has been shown to help.

    Here is some advice from the Alzheimer's Associaton on preventing dementia.

    http://www.alz.org/brainhealth/overview.asp

    Kat
     
  2. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    I hear you Kat. My mom was diagnosed with AD around age 65 or so, she's now 73 and I have see it progress. My sister and I are both scared for her, for our dad and for ourselves. When ever mom has an appt with her neurologist, we always review the vitamins that she's on. Folic acid seems to be important too. But, it should be for women anyway.
    Mom loves word-finds and is knitting dishcloths. Endlessly knitting dishcloths. I think everyone within a one-mile radius has a knitted dishcloth. :p
     

  3. Jaclynne

    Jaclynne Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Kat, my Mom was diagnosed with a degenerative brain desease at 57. She died a couple of years ago. It scares me to death to think I might end up the way she did. So I do everything I can to keep my brain healthy.

    One thing I found (mentioned in a couple of studies) was the correlation in vit B12 deficiency and Alzhiemer patients. Sublingual B vits are an easy thing to add to your regime.

    I good healthy diet void of preservatives and artificial colors and flavors - that means fresh fruits and vegetables. Plenty of water. Get your exercise.

    I think if your goal was to be as healthy as possible and keep a positive mindset while always learning something new, you have as good a chance as it gets to bypass this desease.

    Halo
     
  4. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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  5. PinkBat

    PinkBat Well-Known Member

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    Not all dementia is Alzheimer's, by the way.....my husband's mother had dementia from hundreds of tiny, tiny strokes that went undetected.
     
  6. Jaclynne

    Jaclynne Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thats true PinkBat, my mother's diagnoses was Lewy Bodies desease, although it looked to the untrained eye like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

    Halo
     
  7. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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    My MIL has plain old dementia from many TIA's in her life.

    Today she accused me of stealing candy :D Ah, gotta love it LOL!

    Kat
     
  8. PinkBat

    PinkBat Well-Known Member

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    Are you having to care for her? I noticed you are making a little joke of it....I'm thinking you're releasing tension?
    It starts with little things like accusing you of stealing candy....not able to work the A/C thermostat anymore...getting lost in a one-stoplight-light town...forgetting your children's names...bread crumbs look like bugs, etc. etc.
    At this stage these people know there is something wrong with them.....and I can only imagine the fear they must be going through. It took my mother-in-law two years to die of this.....trust me, the last few months were horrible...she had to sit tied to a wheelchair and she screamed and screamed all day long non-stop. From this exhausting effort and not being able to eat much due to having to scream while eating, she finally wasted away.
     
  9. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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    Hi!

    Yep, I'm the main "caregiver". She is still incredibly independant, can drive, cook, etc. It's a weird complicated situation.

    I do make jokes, it's how I cope. I also do keep a blog for my more serious discussions or posts. It's a good coping mechanism for me. It may seem strange to others though.

    MIL has good days and bad days. We can have really good conversations or sometimes she can act like a rebellious child. Weird thing is her memory loss has been happening for about 15 years, it's just now starting to get "different" sometimes.

    Sorry if my joke bugged you , didn't mean too.

    Kat
     
  10. PinkBat

    PinkBat Well-Known Member

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    I totally understand what you're going through. I've was the caregiver for my mother-in-law for close to a year, when she had to move in with us.
    The second my husband drove up into the yard after work, my son and I used to RUN to my truck...jump in and take off to town. Just for an hour looking around the stores, etc. If we walked to the truck, my mother-in-law would've chased us down, demanding to go too. When she went with us, she would tell everybody in the store that her children are mistreating her, or she would want to return home after 5 minutes.
    I always felt so guilty, when I ran to the truck to escape for an hour....but it kept me sane. So if you need to joke, you go right ahead. Talk to me, if you need to, OK?
     
  11. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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    Aw Pinkbat, I'm sorry you had to go through that!

    Honestly, it's uncanny how EXACT our situation is!

    When MIL is having a bad time, she is just plain nuts/obsessed about the car. One time we left quietly to go to our library, and I'm not kidding, she ran on ice with houseshoes chasing our car! (She had FIL to watch her.) I just couldn't believe it!

    We try to get away an hour a day also, I call it my Hour of Sanity. We go for drives or grocery shopping. I do enjoy my grocery shopping :D LOL! MIL has quit inviting herself to go since we don't have a 4 door vehicle anymore. She does complain about us using the car so much and why do we have to go and all, it gets tiresome.

    She has bad periods (super angry, irritable alot) and since we're down to one car, FIL will run away because he doesn't want to deal with her. He is such a diva LOL! If you hear him running on the porch towards the car, you know what type of day it is lol.

    Thanks again!

    Kat
     
  12. triana1326

    triana1326 Dances in moonlight

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    That's what my dad has. He's getting really bad. last night my mom called to tell me that he was hallucinating and getting really aggressive and paranoid. I'm so glad we'll be back home in 5 days. I hope everything has calmed down since then...Was there anything that you did that would help with the symptoms?
     
  13. Jaclynne

    Jaclynne Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Music. I'm not sure (though there are some studies to indicate yes) if this works equally well with all patients, but my Mom responded to music. Of course she was a music lover always. We'd sing to her, the songs we grew up hearing her sing. Not today's popular music, but what she remembered, like the hymns my granny sang and her favorite secular music.

    Also helped to massage her back with lotion. She got to the point she couldn't stand to have her feet or hands touched, but she'd calm down if you rubbed her back.

    And even after she didn't know you when you came into the room, she'd still recognize a familair voice. It was hard to make people understand that. Old friends and some family were uncomfortable visiting because its pretty painful for a best friend or family to not know you when they are looking right at you. But if you talked for a bit she'd respond, and for some, the first word out of their mouth and she'd recognize them.

    The hallucinations were horrible. I can remember Mom staring wildly around as if monsters or some other horror were in the room with her. She'd cry for hours like she was in some heartbroken pain. I'd just cry along with her. Finally we convinced the doctor to give her something. We'd rather she be completely out of it than that miserable. They didn't want to give her anything that might be addictive. :shrug: Why, did they think she'd miraculously recover from dlb to find herself an addict? Sheesh!

    I hope your mother is not the only caregiver. This disease can take a lot out of a caregiver.

    Is your father on any meds? The docs tried all kinds of things. Finally settleing on the protocol for treating Parkinsons and Alzheimers. Plus something for seizures and to keep her calm. I don't have much faith in those drugs, and in fact we saw improvement the last week of her life when we dc all meds except pain. The seizures stopped, the muscle contractions stopped, she didn't have the pain in her joints and muscles. I think some of the meds caused some of this.

    There came a time when Mom stopped swallowing. She aspirated a few times with the resulting respiratory problems. When she stopped swallowing completely, we stopped the meds too. Her orders were no feeding tube, and we wouldn't have used an envasive measure like that to prolong her misery anyway. I hope your father's long-term wishes are clear, it helps if the family does not have to make a decision like that. Those decisions are better made before the emotion of the moment clouds the thinking.

    Sorry, I gave you much more info than you asked. Sometimes it helps me to talk about it.

    Halo