The DHIA test results for the 4 milking here

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by JeffNY, Jun 27, 2006.

  1. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

    Messages:
    2,102
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    Well first test for these guys, and it is the only 4 milking at this time, another next month, and another in August. Either way, the only numbers I have is production, no SCC, BF and Protein till Thursday.



    For those familiar with the animals, or if you aren't, go to my site www.beechhillfarms.us and look them up, "Amber" isn't in the drop down menu, and all of their pictures aren't current, haven't had time to take new pictures.


    Here are the weights.

    Amber who freshened back in December, December 6th. She is 204 in milk. Her weight was 52lbs

    The others are the holsteins. Red who went through a fractured leg, is giving 60lbs today for the test.

    Sassy freshened back on April 23rd, she is giving 88lbs.

    Speedy who is giving a good chunk. She is giving 100lbs, with the test today.


    All of these are first calf heifers, the holsteins get 18lbs of grain/day, pasture, some baleage. The Jersey gets 12lbs/day. So nothing special, no corn silage, and getting some good numbers. The herd average, between the 4 is 75lbs, which is 22875lbs for a 305 day number.


    Jeff
     
  2. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

    Messages:
    3,841
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Location:
    KS
    Jeff, Good Production for heifers. Now at the risk of you being miffed, I am going to offer some advice from one who has been there done that. Your feeding program coupled with that production is not sustainable. Speedy & Sassy will require 22-24 lbs of grain daily along with the excellent baleage & pasture you are providing.
    At the 18 lb. a day level, they will go into an energy deficit situation, and fail to produce a good egg, hence failing to breed back in a timely fashion. They will be open for too long, and then you will either be milking them well beyond 420 days in milk or having them stand dry in excess of 60 days.
    At present they are drawing off body reserves to provide that production.
    By 90-120 days in milk those reserves will be gone. And they must be allowed some extra feed input for the "Sophomore Stretch" the extra growth in length &width that occurs between first and second calving.
    Waalllll, I guess you could listen to all this and adjust feeding, play it safe with those valuable young cows. In the long run you might be better off to totally ignore advice given, and learn it the hard way. Lessons learned hard are not soon forgotten.
     

  3. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

    Messages:
    2,102
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    Already have one bred back @ 50 days, we'll see if she took. But she came into a really good heat after a cidr and some lute.


    As far as condition goes, sassy has gained condition for the past month, speedy shed her fat, and hasn't lost any condition either. The only one that has the boney look is the Jersey, but they seem to look like that regardless.


    As far as red goes, she hasn't lost much condition, if any since calving. I need to tape them, to see what their weight is, but guessing by the way sassy looks, she seems to have put on condition, hips aren't as evident as they were back in May.


    Jeff
     
  4. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

    Messages:
    6,627
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2005
    Location:
    Near Traverse City Michigan
    I had the same problem when I was farming. I bought high producing heifers, and they milked great, but I couldnt feed them enough energy. I always had lots of trouble getting them bred back
     
  5. savinggrace

    savinggrace COO of manure management

    Messages:
    1,427
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Hi,

    I am curious, how do your cows earn their keep? Do you sell milk to a dairy, or off the farm, or do you use it all yourselves?
     
  6. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

    Messages:
    2,102
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    Presently, we don't have enough to ship. However once the inspector returns from vacation around the 10th of July, we should pass easily and should begin shipping shortly after. Going to get a couple extra animals from some people we are friends with. Takes 180lbs to hit the beater, and with 6 it should do that on the first milking. With a every other day pickup, we should be shipping 720lbs or so, not a bad number for 6 animals. For now however the milk is being used on calves, and for those who have dogs :).



    Jeff
     
  7. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

    Messages:
    2,102
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    Got the results in for SCC, BF and protein. Considering the national average is 750,000 according to Vermont DHIA, my results are pretty decent.


    Avg 4 cows 75.0 3.8 2.8 3.0 84

    Cows in SCC order Weighted Average SCC: 180

    Index Barn Milk Fat Pro SCC Count DIM Lac CAR W/O %Cells
    849 SPEEDY 100.0 3.7 2.5 5.0 400 46 1 69 74.2
    801 AMBER 52.0 4.1 3.2 3.6 152 204 1 40 14.7
    852 FIDORED 60.0 3.1 2.9 1.8 44 19 1 38 4.9
    854 SASSY 88.0 4.4 2.5 1.6 38 66 1 6.2

    Speedy's is a tad high, the lab person said that heifers can be high, not always but it isn't uncommon. Nevertheless, 180,000 for an average is decent. If I were to exclude speedy, or if she tested 150,000 like amber. My SCC would be 95,500. Or if she wasn't counted it would be 78,000. This is with only 4, and the average isn't accurate untill I have the total of 19 milking, or atleast over 10. Funny, some people say Jerseys produce more BF than holsteins. Sassy proves that Jerseys do not, Amber is the Jersey.


    Jeff
     
  8. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

    Messages:
    3,841
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Location:
    KS
    Jeff 180 SCC avg is good. For a commercial dairy farm, as long as bulk tank average is 280 or less, one should focus efforts on sending every pound of milk to town they can. We have a couple of those dairy plant quality awards hanging in our milkhouse( requires 12 months consecutive SCC <200) and you know what? When the chips are down, those 8 1/2 X 11 pieces of paper won't buy any groceries.
    As to your comment Jersey vs. Holstein Butterfat --
    *** 1 cow does not a breed make,LOL.***********************
     
  9. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

    Messages:
    2,102
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    Yes, however peoples arguements that Jerseys are always higher than holsteins in BF. It isn't the case, it is breeding.



    Jeff
     
  10. evermoor

    evermoor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    256
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Looks great, congrats and keep up the good work. In many ways a little envious!
     
  11. dcross

    dcross Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,002
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Location:
    East central WI
    <<Jerseys are always higher than holsteins in BF. It isn't the case, it is breeding.>>

    And the feeding!