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To everyone who has kindly and patiently answered my "newbie" questions regarding goats, THANK YOU. :worship: You guys could have made fun of me (and all of the other newbies,) but you have been supportive and willing to share your knowledge. As a result, you have all made this process so much less frightening. I'm actually starting to believe I might learn to take care of my goats without killing them by accident or pulling my hair out :haha:
Karen and Kids
 

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Its nice to see somebody else starting to get into goats. Everybody has been in your shoes one time or another..meaning to say everybody on this forum was a newbie at one time. Its hard for me to believe that just a little over a year ago I got my first goat..and was making all the newbie mistakes and learning. Now I have aprox. 16 goats and am starting to breed la manchas, mini manchas, and boers. But I was lucky...I got to work for a gal who has bred goats for almost 20 years so I learned a lot from her and we are still great friends..I am also good friends with her son not to mention they live 15 minutes away from me :) .

Just remember no question is ever stupid if it is important to the person asking it.

MotherClucker
ps: You are doing better than I did at first! My first goat got alfalfa and free choice grain the first week that I had her..intill I learned better :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: .
 

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We've all been newbies at one point. When I got my first 2 I hovered and fussed over them constantly, then I figured out that I was making them fat and they were playing me for all the attention they could. Now I just make sure I'm seeing shiny hair, bright eyes, and dry noses. As long as the little one is putting on some good growth I figure I'm doing fine. As long as they're both getting into all sorts of "interesting" trouble I figure they're happy and healthy. When one of them is actually behaving themselves is when I start to worry.

When you get more used to the critters everything sort of falls into place. And as you get them through various ailments, things become much more routine.
 

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I had read that goats should be kept a little on the thin side. So, one morning a few months after I brought home the first few goats, I commented to my son that we needed to cut down Callie Jean's feed a little, because I noticed she appeared very slightly plump. That evening, right on cue with the first cold front of the fall, she surprised us with two gorgeous doe kids. I had no idea she was even bred :eek: and quickly did the math to determine that I'd bought her one month bred, unbeknownst to me or the seller. lol.
You'll make a few mistakes, and have a few surprises, but it'll be a lot of fun.
mary
 
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