Thank goodness for the valuable education I received here ...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mama2littleman, Jul 22, 2006.

  1. mama2littleman

    mama2littleman El Paso

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    Well, as many of you know, I've been on the homestead quest for a while now. I have been diligently researching properties all over the country and come across a few that have warranted further investigation. I haven't found "THE ONE" yet, but lessons learned here have definately saved me from making some potentially costly errors.

    I passed on a property in Alaska when Cabin Fever was kind enough to give me information on the soil structure and its suitability for septic.

    I passed on a property in New Mexico because the well was a shared well and located off of the property. Plus it was almost 1500 feet deep, and after learning about the cost of drilling a new well here, I decided I didn't want to take that kind of gamble.

    I passed on a property in Maine because it had a snowmobile trail easement along an abandoned railway only 300 meters from the house. Decided I didn't want the potential drama.

    The husband and I just decided against further investigating a property in Wisconsin because the sellers wanted to maintain ownership of the driveway and grant an easement to the buyers to access the property. Thus they could maintain access to an adjacent parcel. Without the driveway, the property becomes a landlocked parcel, and after lessons learned here regarding easments and neighbor disputes, we decided that that was an immediate deal breaker and have decided to look elsewhere. Plus, they wanted to take all the landscaping with them. Hey, it's their home, and they can sell it however they choose. But, I certainly won't purchase it under those conditions.

    So ... even though we haven't found our homestead yet, we know that the right piece of property is out there. My time here has allowed me to gain the knowledge about what o look at during a property search, especially a rural property search.

    SO I thank all of you for sharing your knowledge and experience.

    Nikki
     
  2. Wags

    Wags Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Take there landscaping with them? Never heard of that before, maybe taking a prize rose bush or two.... but all the landscaping. Sounds like you made a wise choice to step away from that property!
     

  3. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Distant neighbor agreed to sell (actually swapped houses with someone else) his house shortly after his long-suffering wife got new cupboards.

    Long story short, they worked out a deal where the wife took the new cupboards with her to the new house. I'm not sure how that all fit in, but it was the talk of the neigborhood 40 years ago....

    --->Paul
     
  4. mama2littleman

    mama2littleman El Paso

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    Honestly, I think they really don't want to sell. The property has been on the market for over a year and the "conditions" they have placed upon the sale, combined with a pretty inflated price, make me think they are just waiting to see if someone is dumb enough to bite.

    I'm with you on the landscaping, we saw that condition and the hubby and I looked at eachother and asked "Are these people high?"

    Beuatiful property, but definately not worth the hassle.

    Nikki
     
  5. mama2littleman

    mama2littleman El Paso

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    Paul,

    It was the talk of the neighborhood because it's just one of those things that make you scratch your head and say "Huh?"

    Nikki
     
  6. texican

    texican Well-Known Member

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    If they wanted to retain ownership of the road, imho, no big deal. Actually would be a good thing. Land you wouldn't have to purchase. With a deeded easement you would have access guaranteed by law... and if they sold the other parcel, no matter if you or they held the ownership of the road property, the folks buying the other parcel would have automatic easement also...

    At least here in TX, if property is held by one owner at one time or another, and subdivided, all subdividees are granted easements... (been there, done that... from both sides of the 'easement').

    Just don't wait forever, because if it's a perfect property, it probably won't ever come up for sale...

    good luck...
     
  7. Selena

    Selena proud to be pro-choice

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    And beware of not owning the mineral rights - another "in the fine print" print of a lot of contracts. You'd only be entitled to the cost of the structures and still have to find another place. My only suggestion would be that if you do buy with an easement, to make dang sure it is on the deed and in your title policy. This would be the time to have a real estate lawyer review the documents for you. And do take a look at the zoning the adjacent/near by property. And if the owner(s) is elderly, be aware that those who inherit may be broke and/or greedy and will sell out quicker than you could blink.