testing for diseases

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Caprice Acres, Aug 6, 2005.

  1. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    i just saw a post on testing for diseases. should i be doing this? how do i go about doing this and how much does it cost?
     
  2. lacesout

    lacesout Well-Known Member

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    We just had our yearling tested for CAE this morning. I think it was around 35.00 and the vet drew blood which was sent to Texas for evaluation. It was a little upsetting to me to have the vet inserting the needle into GoatBaby's neck, but she seems to be fine. I asked if there were other tests he would recommend and he said no. I do know there is also CL, brucellosis, and TB testing available, though the vet we used didn't offer it.
     

  3. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    That's really an impossible question to answer. Each herd is soo different, everyones goal is personal. For myself I want to know the status of my herd. I want to know I am doing everything I can to insure folks who buy from me are getting healthy stock. I started out horribly, was ripped off by the best of them, not only diseased stock, but missrepresented paperwork. Why I do lists like these. Vicki
     
  4. natybear

    natybear Well-Known Member

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    Most people want to know that their herd and those they are buying from are CAE and CL free. Lots of people with Nubians like to know the genetic status of G6S in their herd to avoid a recessive genetic condition causing immune system failures and early death. It is important to people in certain areas to have fecal samples checked by the vet a few times a year, to properly treat cocci, worms, and other internal bugs. Washington State University and Texas Vet Medical Diagnostic Lab are the two I was recommended for blood work. I just got my results back from TVMDL and believe them to be very helpful in getting it all set up for you.

    It costs a lot. I paid out of state costs to TVMDL of $35 per goat for G6S, $7/CL and $6/CAE, the vet bill, and then the cost of shipping and blood drawning equip & tubes.

    I hope this can help.
     
  5. Ellie5

    Ellie5 Well-Known Member

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    It cost me $99.00/goat for my initial testing of CL, TB, Bruc., CAE, & Johnes. It may be less in your area.

    The 6-month mark I only tested for CAE & Johnes as CL is best tested if there is an abscess (which I have none), and TB & Bruc. are either Pos or Neg so my vet said it would be a waste of money to retest that.

    I'm not sure what each individual test is as I havn't gotten the official bill yet for the 6-month testing. I'm under the impression that 3 full tests of all goats, 6 months apart over a year & a half if all are negative, would be a good indication that no diseases are present in the herd. After that a "sampling" once a year is acceptable to monitor the herd.

    Yes it's a big initial cost for me but I have a small herd & I also want to make sure my goats are healthy. Each breeder has their own agenda & budget so it is an individual decision. These are just my management practices.

    I'm not familiar with G6S. Can someone enlighten me on that?
     
  6. natybear

    natybear Well-Known Member

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    G6S is a genetic condition only in Nubians and Nubian derived animals (crosses). This defect's full names are mucopolysaccharidosis IIID, or G-6-Sulfase deficiency, and it is usually referred to as G6S. About 25% of Nubians carry this gene. All cases are the result of a single mutation. The affected goats lack an enzyme (G-6-S) and this results in a variety of symptoms of varying severity. The main symptom exhibited by affected goats is failure to grow. Sometimes the kid is smaller than normal at birth, and grows slowly. Some breeders have reported kids which grew normally for the first three months and then stopped growing. Other affected goats grow to what appears to be normal size but is in fact small for the particular bloodlines. They lack muscle mass and sometimes have blocky heads. Immune function appears to be compromised, and sometimes they become deaf or blind. The longest-lived goat known to be G-6-S affected died at just under four years of age, and death is usually due to heart failure. Unfortunately affected animals can and do grow up normal-like and do breed, although they often experience reproductive problems.

    The biggest problem is that some of the best goat herds in the US have carriers and you will be very upset if you have gorgeous animals and some of the babies are affected by a genetic condition. It is something you only have to test for once and the great thing is, when you only have normal animals you don't have to test the offspring because there is no chance of getting a carrier from a normal gened animal.

    Goatworld.com has an article on it that is very helpful I think.

    Hope this helps.