Tepary beans

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Cyngbaeld, Mar 26, 2006.

  1. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Been reading about these drought/heat tolerant beans and was thinking of getting some. Overwhelming variety offered at

    http://www.nativeseeds.org/v2/cat.php?catID=42&cp=2

    Have any of you tried any of them? Have a favorite variety? Don't think I could try all 29 this yr. LOL
     
  2. Txsteader

    Txsteader Well-Known Member

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    Funny thing, Cyngbaeld, in all my searches for beans, I've never heard of tepary beans. But after investigating the link you gave, I'm definitely interested. Going to do a little more research; would like to know more about yields and flavor, but drought tolerance absolutely gets my attention. Thanks.
     

  3. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    You're welcome! One thing I noticed was that with too much water you get lots of foliage, but under drought conditions you get lots of beans. Cool!
     
  4. Txsteader

    Txsteader Well-Known Member

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  5. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    I've grown the Mitla Black Tepary the past 2 years. It did well the first season which was cool and wet. Second year was hot and dry and it was excellent. In wet years, you don't want any mature pods to touch the ground or the beans will begin sprouting. That's due to their "hurry up" gene which tells them grow at the first hint of rain. You can plant them and they will be up in only 4 or 5 days. Very rapid growth after that.

    In a soup bean mix, they are just a bit smaller than Black Turtle beans. (All tepary beans are about that size.) At $2.50 for 50 beans, we've got a few thousand dollars worth on hand. But with Black Turtle also in the mix, it'd be interesting to try to sort them out!

    Native Seeds doesn't have the black ones but www.seedsofchange.com/ does have them. I'll be planting them again this year along with Sonoran Gold.

    Martin
     
  6. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Txsteader, interesting article, thanks.

    Martin, thankyou too. Did you pick any of yours in the green stage? Or do you just let them mature and dry on the vine?

    I'm eager to try some of these.
     
  7. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I did sample the tepary beans when green and found the pods surprisingly sweet. I can only speak for the 2 that I've grown and when the pods were still flat. Since I was also growing Black Turtle at the same time, I'd say that they were both very close for taste. Black Turtle is one of many dry bean types which also are tasty snap beans when young. That's a fact that is nearly lost since we have forgotten that many beans are excellent dual-purpose vegetables, green and dry.

    Martin
     
  8. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    That's great! I like anything that is dual purpose. And it seems wasteful to just let the vines grow, dry out and get only one mess of beans out of them.