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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It just goes to show that anything can happen at anytime...I hope these evacuated people were prepared in some manner.

CNN) -- A wall holding back 80 acres of sludge from a coal plant in central Tennessee broke this week, spilling more than 500 million gallons of waste into the surrounding area.
The sludge, a byproduct of ash from coal combustion, was contained at a retention site at the Tennessee Valley Authority's power plant in Kingston, about 40 miles east of Knoxville, agency officials said.

The retention wall breached early Monday, sending the sludge downhill and damaging 15 homes. All the residents were evacuated, and three homes were deemed uninhabitable, a TVA spokesman told CNN.

Full news story here.
 

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"And 2 days before Christmas...." was all I could think. I really feel for those poor folk who have been moved from their homes. At least a few of the homes were there before they built the coal plant and sludge pond.

What would YOU do if ALL of your preps and your Christmas presents and plans got completely ruined by something like this?

Me? Wow... after I got through screaming, then crying, I'm not sure what I'd do......
 

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What would YOU do if ALL of your preps and your Christmas presents and plans got completely ruined by something like this?
Call my insurance agent.
Something like that I'd want my insurance company to know about as soon as they can. The policy should cover hotel rooms for this. They also have corporate attorneys to fight out the details with the coal company. I'm just happy we've never had to use our policy.
 

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Yes, I agree that I would move away, if I could. Problem is, many of these folks would be leaving their family homes, and have no place to go. This disaster happened less than 40 miles from me, and is downstream on the Clinch River where I live and fish. They claim that mercury and arsenic are in the fly ash, but TVA assures all that no contamination has been found in the water (yet).
I hate TVA since the 1970's land-grab they pulled on the damming of the Little Tennessee river (Tellico dam project). They ripped off landowners of their family farms, to later sell it off to rich developers. They dammed up one of the best trout rivers in the eastern U.S., and inundated the homeland of the Cherokee, including the site of Chota the ancient capital of the Cherokee nation. In spite of opposition, TVA got their way and pulled the dirty deal off anyway.
This is a perfect example of a government bureaucracy which has moved far from it's original purpose. Sure, TVA helped this valley during the 1930's by controlling floods and providing jobs, but now they have moved from creating electricity to developing nerve gas for the military. And folks are expected to trust them after a tragedy like this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I originally posted this thread to highlight a situation where having emergency preps is essential and hoped that these evacuees had said preps. Can we not leave all the politics and big corp / company bashing out of threads such as this and instead discuss the real issue that these people had to leave their homes with no notice and have their lives forever changed by the incident.
 

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For about 2 years we lived below an ash pond, would have never dreamed that it breaking was a possibility. What surprises me is that have such a large ash pond now, as our local power company sells all the ash, and has significantly reduced the size of the ash pond.

In that type situation most of my emergency preps would have been destroyed by the 'flood'. If it happened suddenly, I'm not even sure my bug out stuff would have survived.
Dawn
 

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Being pushed out by a sludge pond never occured to me as a danger to anyone.

Makes me wonder what other "odd" situations have I not considered.

Not suggesting I should worry about every thing, but guessing there is more out there to consider than I would have thought.
 

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What would YOU do if ALL of your preps and your Christmas presents and plans got completely ruined by something like this?
Jump on the bailout wagon? Can individuals do that? LOL

Seriously, I'd probably be sueing the company that put the stuff there and endangered my home. If I couldn't sue, I'd be SOL b/c I don't have insurance.
 

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Please accept my humble apologies for hijacking your thread with my rant on TVA. Silly me, reacting with harsh words towards them!

I guess I am just reacting with anger at the huge scale of the disaster that displaced my neighbors and now threatens us downwind after the stuff dries out and becomes windborne. We have to breathe fly ash with cesium, arsenic, mercury, and lots of other bad stuff now.
 

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I love it how people call this sludge. Sludge makes it sounds less hazardous.

What this has becomes is one huge super fund site.

This has become the power utilities' worst nightmare after pouring so much effort and money into making this stuff look beneficial, even if its a waste product.
 

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Please accept my humble apologies for hijacking your thread with my rant on TVA. Silly me, reacting with harsh words towards them!

I guess I am just reacting with anger at the huge scale of the disaster that displaced my neighbors and now threatens us downwind after the stuff dries out and becomes windborne. We have to breathe fly ash with cesium, arsenic, mercury, and lots of other bad stuff now.
What actions have you taken to stay safe for you and yours due to this happening?
That is survival, how are you doing it?

Angie
 

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That's the scary part, Angie. I am prepared for shelter, fuel, lights, food and water. How do I prepare for an airborne dust that is going to possibly contaminate the region, possibly miles from ground zero? I guess I could follow the FEMA advice and buy a roll of plastic and some duct tape to seal up my windows.

Folks who get their water downstream from the Tennessee River will be drinking the stuff. What will become of the lakes downstream, already hit years ago with radioactive spills from Oak Ridge during the 1940's and '50's?
 

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i don't get the drama attached to this. my family from all over the country called to ask if we are ok. i'm about 100 miles away.

yes, it's bad it happened. but no lives were lost, only a few homes damaged and apparently nothing toxic in the sludge.

i mean, it's bad and sad it happened near christmas. but on a global scale of the horrible things that can happen this barely registers a blip.

my brother said it was on the national news as the worst environmental disaster since the exxon valdez. it must be a slow news week.

if folks had prepped for this and if the stuff didn't get wet, they likely wouldn't have to get into their stores. they still have lights and water and vehicles and those with damage to their home had to spend xmas in a motel. no doubt tva is facing a sizable tab for clean up and those who sue for damages.
 

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I realize this is a horrid happening and I would not want ash water all over my stuff either, I am glad it was not sewage sludge. I somehow do not see this as much worse than the St. Helens ash we had years back. A real problem for a while but it is, after all, only ash stuff. sis
 

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I was under the impression that the sludge could contain benzene, mercury & arsenic and several other toxic chemicals that are a by-product of the coal burning process that makes the ash.

The authorities have not "declared" it toxic yet because the law requires testing first.

My reaction was more over the timing. Any time is not a good time to lose your home, but 2 days before Christmas is a you-know-what buster.
 

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That's the scary part, Angie. I am prepared for shelter, fuel, lights, food and water. How do I prepare for an airborne dust that is going to possibly contaminate the region, possibly miles from ground zero? I guess I could follow the FEMA advice and buy a roll of plastic and some duct tape to seal up my windows.

Folks who get their water downstream from the Tennessee River will be drinking the stuff. What will become of the lakes downstream, already hit years ago with radioactive spills from Oak Ridge during the 1940's and '50's?
I think this is a very interesting point I personally hadn't thought of before. What about the problems that aren't immediately threatening, but are long-term threatening, such as some sort of contamination event. At this point, you're at the mercy of the gov't and corps dealing fairly with the problem, or having a bunch of lawyers sue, either which will likely take a long time.

Meanwhile, chances are you'd have a bit more trouble selling your house to move, and it might even be impossible to sell. Since most people have much of their net wealth tied up in their house, that doesn't leave too many choices...

I don't have any solution, but this is certainly a SHTF type of event that I hadn't really considered before, a "slow" SHTF.

--sgl
 
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