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Neighbor has puppies to give away.

What kind of temperment might one expect?

Mother is collie, border collie mix
Father is a Pyr.
 

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Temperaments on all three of those are generally very good, though there are exceptions to every breed. The most important part is how you raise the pup up. Socialize, Socialize, train, train.
 

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I would say it would really depend on the temperament of the parents. Some Pyrs can be over the top protective. If you add that to a neurotic dog, it could be dangerous. If mom and dad are both laid back, watch the pups carefully, preferably for long periods of time once they really start interacting with their world with the ability to figure out who is who. Then note temperament of the individuals and figure out which one has the kind of temperament that fits you. Here's a good link that describes what to look for and what it means:

http://www.tiarapoodles.com/temperament.html
 

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I have no doubt the pups can have nice temperaments and be very people friendly but who knows what breed traits they will display. Low prey drive versus high, wanders or not, low energy or high energy, independent thinkers or highly trainable to commands. Its hard to say what parent they will take after. If its for a family pet, I would say go for it. If you want a herding dog or a LGD I would look else where.
 

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If momma and poppa have good temperaments the babies should be alright. If the mother appears skitzy at all walk away. Even if the puppy seems fine now alot of time the skitzy gene comes out at about 7 months of age.
 

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A friend of mine had a pyr border collie cross. It was an outstanding herding dog, and competitive in sheepdog trials. Who would have thought. He mostly seemed to take after the border collie in temperament. For the most part neurotic dogs(at least in the breeds mentioned) are raised in a way that brings out those kind of behaviors, not born that way.
Just like in any breed there are backyard breeders who care nothing about health or temperament,so it might depend on where the parent's breeding comes from.

Nice site on the temperament test!! We did that with a litter of border collie pups last year. It was interesting to see how each pup matured and changed over time. All the pups except 1 out of 5 were very middle of the road, not too dominant, and not too timid. All but one showed interest in a toy, but none would bring it back. None were sound sensitive , or aggressive . The 4 pups I've kept in close touch with have turned out to be nice level headed biddable working dogs.
That test is nice because you can see a pup's tendencies and spend a little more time on certain things a pup might have trouble with.
 

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Nice site on the temperament test!! We did that with a litter of border collie pups last year. It was interesting to see how each pup matured and changed over time. All the pups except 1 out of 5 were very middle of the road, not too dominant, and not too timid. All but one showed interest in a toy, but none would bring it back. None were sound sensitive , or aggressive . The 4 pups I've kept in close touch with have turned out to be nice level headed biddable working dogs.
That test is nice because you can see a pup's tendencies and spend a little more time on certain things a pup might have trouble with.
Years ago, our Lab breeder/vet had our litter temperament tested and she invited us to watch. We picked our female based on the outcome of the test and we were also able to follow the rest of the litter since most went to people we knew and the rest we followed through the breeder. They really did seem to mature just like the tester said they would. It kind of got me hooked on researching the issue and testing it. We had two litters of pups out of that female and followed almost all of the pups for years. As a matter of fact, I am still friends with many of the people who owned those dogs though there are few left at this point. The traits we saw in the puppies really did follow them all the way through their life. The problem is that many breeders don't spend enough time with the litter to know the individual personalities of their pups. Those that do are able to tell you what each individual is like, their strengths and weaknesses and which one might be the best fit for your personality.
 

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If you are going to use a temperament test, do it when the puppies are not hungry or sleepy, or overstimulated.
 

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I haven't had any experience with Pyreneses, but we do have Border Collies and they are the most wonderful, clever dogs. BC's can be very energetic and need lots of exercise and things to do or they'll drive you bonkers.

Our boys came from the same litter and have very contrasting temperaments. My sister's, Wolfgang, whom she picked out the day we went to see them is very robust, extremely friendly, affectionate and I like to call him a "goody 4 shoes"; he has to be center of attention or he's not content.

Mine, Ludwig, was timid as a pup, not as robust as Wolfie (still isn't - he's more long and skinny where Wolfie is stouter) and we didn't even see him when we went to pick out Wolfie. Luwie was shy and avoided being caught, but when the breeder picked him up and I saw his face, I knew he was the one for me.

He was difficult as a puppy (still can be), cried the whole time the breeder had him isolated in a pen to get his shots and while we filled out the paperwork, ignored me the first few days, was anxious and rebellious, but soon came around and we're very attached. We live in a remote area and my sister and I work at home so they don't see a lot of people.

He is almost 3 now, still anxious, but very playful. He's harder to train than Wolfie because he's nervous about new things, but when he learns something, he does it 200% ("close the door" with him is more like "slam the door"). When he's happy, he's super happy and he can be a handful, but I wouldn't trade him for the world.
 
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