Tell us about your service experience

Discussion in 'Home Defense/Guns' started by Melissa, Mar 26, 2004.

  1. Melissa

    Melissa member

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    Where did you serve? How long? What was the hardest part? Were there enjoybale experiences? If you volunteered would you do it again?
     
  2. Kirk

    Kirk Well-Known Member

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    I Joined the U.S. Navy in March of 1984. Boot Camp in orlando FL. Signalman "A" School also in Orlando. Assigned to the U.S.S. Hawes (FFG 53) out of Charleston SC. It was in pre-comissioning (still being built), so we were barracked first in Norfolk VA, then in Bath ME. After comiisining our first foriegn port was Ochos Rios Jamaca.I visited many ports in the Caribean and the Bermudas.
    My first cruise came in 1987. It was a Med cruise Where I was able to visit Italy, France and Morroco. During the cruise the U.S.S. Stark was hit by an Iraqi missile killing 31 sailors. The Hawes was called off of our leisurly med cruise to run down the Suez canal and start escorting reflagged Kuwaiti tankers in the Persian Gulf. That ended up extending our cruise by 2 months and eliminated a lot of really neat ports which we had been scheduled to visit. I returned home form that cruise to meet for the very first time my five month old son (kid three of six).
    I re-enlisted in 1988 as an E-5 and transfered to the U.S.S. Jesse L. Brown (FF 1089) The Brown had just returned from a med cruise when I arrived aboard. Before I left the Brown we did a UNITAS cruise which is all the way around the South American contenant. I had the chance to visit every coastal country in South America except Columbia.
    In 1990 I began my shore rotation with Recruiting school in Panama City FL. I was stationed in Cadillac MI as a recruiter. In 1991 I recieved a meritorious advancement to E-6 for recruiting excellence. When my tour of recruiting was over I decided to leave the Navy to stay close to my children since my ex-wife and I were divorcing and I would have ended up transfering 1000 mile from them and seeing them once or twice a year.
    Would I do it again? Yes. Last week would have been my retirement date. I do not regret my decision to get out, it was the right thing to do at the time.
    Kirk
     

  3. bridget

    bridget Well-Known Member

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    I'm trying to remember if the naval base in Orlando was shut down in the 90's?
     
  4. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    The Navel Training Facility was shut down, its now the VA medical clinic.
     
  5. gefozarks

    gefozarks Well-Known Member

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    I joined the Navy in 1969 after a greetings letter from my uncle sam. I did boot camp in San Diego then Hospital Corps school ( I don't know if it still stands but at the time my class in corps school had the highest average grade in history not that we were so smart but on day one we were told that the top 10% of our class would get our choice of duty stations and the other 90% would be given orders to assist the marines in vietnam), following corps school I went to Oakland for lab school then to a Naval auxillary air station in Milton Florida about 50 miles from pensacola then to Portsmouth Va. for x-ray school after school I stayed at portsmouth then to a cruiser home ported in Japan for my last six months of the total 7 1/2 years I spent in what I refer to as the canoe club. I never went to Vietnam nor did I ever volunteer to go I felt that I had made good on my obligation to serve by joining and taking my chances and if I had received orders to Vietnam I would have gone. I think that the hardest day of my time in service was spent taking x rays of many of the returning POW's released from vietnam. Due to security none of the techs taking the films were allowed to see them they were only seen by the Capt who was the chief of Radiology. It was so humbling to see these men who had been through so much and still love thier country as so many of these men did. With the time in I sometimes wish that I could have stayed in and retired as I had just made E6 before I got out. But even then I wanted to be a homesteader and still have the booklet I received from Pel Freeze in the early 1970's on raising rabbits for them. I got out in november 1976 and had no idea it would take until 1997 before my homesteading dream would come true. I know that without especialy the prescription drugs I get from the VA today I could not survive. When I asked my local Pharmacist what the meds I take would cost he told me close to $1,000 a month this is due to me being on cardiac, thyroid, pain meds, and breathing medications. Little did I know how important my service would be later in my life. I also made my living since I got out of the Navy as a x-ray tech and found that the training I had received was equall to any of the techs I worked with after getting out. I still think the the United States has a lot wrong with it but am so glad to be a citizen of a country where I have the right to say what I think it wrong as well as what I think is right. My mom always told my sister and me growing up that if you don't vote don't female dog. In many ways I can't think of a better way to thank vets than by voting every chance you get no matter how you vote the price for you to be able to vote the way you choose was paid for by the sacrifice of vets many paying the ultimate price.
     
  6. Kung

    Kung Administrator Staff Member Supporter

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    Yep....matter of fact, our company was one of the very last to graduate from the boot camp there.

    As far as my service experience goes, I joined to be a nuclear reactor operator. I attended Nuclear Field "A" School and Nuclear Power School in Orlando, and then went on to Nuclear Prototype in Goose Creek, SC.

    I passed the final written test, but failed the oral boards because of stage fright, essentially. :no:

    So I ended up being reclassed as a 'regular' ET, and I got sent to the USS Enterprise. I ran their unclassified and classified LANs for about 4 years, and then I got transferred to CINCLANTFLT. (Commander in Chief of the Atlantic Fleet - now called COMLANTFLT). I was there for 2 years, and then I got out as an E-5.

    I am now in the Army Reserves as a SGT in the US Army Corps of Engineers. :)
     
  7. beowoulf90

    beowoulf90 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Joined in Oct 1977, went active duty July 1978
    Basic training and AIT at Fort Sill, OK Trained as a "gun bunny" "red leg" artillery crewman. Went to Fort Benning to jump school (Airborne school) about Oct 1978. 1st assignment was with Alpha Battery 1/319 Field Artillery, 82nd Airborne at Fort Bragg, NC in Nov 1978, served there til 1981. Reenlisted and changed my MOS to an 81B (draftsman). Went to Germany and served with the 23rd Combat Engineers, 3rd Armor Division until 1984.

    The memories of being on the plane right after they first took the hostages in Iran in 1979 and again when the botched the rescue of the hostages sticks in my mind. We didn't know if we were going in or not.

    My time in the Airborne has given me alot of experiences that I can still draw from. I know nothing is impossible and that it "is the prettiest skirt I ever looked under"....LOL

    skirt is the parachute..

    I was always glad to see it open..
     
  8. South of Forty

    South of Forty Active Member

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    I went into the US Navy in late 1981. Went through Officers Candidate School and served most of my time aboard a Guided Missile Destroyer out of Norfolk Virginia. We spent a great deal of time under weigh -moving around the world to trouble spots and showing the flag.

    While there were a lot of tense moments at sea and a constant sense of apprehension, the most difficult part of my service was being away from my wife. Being at sea for literally months at a time with no opportunity to speak let alone see one another took a toll on our relationship and we seperated just prior to my end of service life and later divorced. We may have eventually gone that way, however the time apart definately hastened if not caused the failure of our marriage.
     
  9. BillHoo

    BillHoo Well-Known Member

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    Currently out in FOB Speicher, Iraq. Started out in Air Defense Artillery as an enlisted in 1985. got stationed on a smoldering rock in the south pacific called Hawaii. got out of the active component in 1987. Been in the national guard since then. got my commission as an officer in 1992. got snacgged for Operation Iraqi Freedom in March 2004, trained in Ft. Drum, NY in May 2004. Arrived here in theater Oct 2004...now just waiting to go home.

    During this time I've squirreled away my tax-free, combat pay and rented out my townhouse in NJ. I should have a nice nest egg by the time I get out. Looking to buy a small plot to homestead somewhere not too far from where I work in NYC. I guess staring at dry, sterile desert the past year has made me appreciate the green pastures and lush forests of the American Northeast.
     
  10. ihedrick

    ihedrick Can't stop thinkin'

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    Enlisted in 1988 and went off to Parris Island for boot camp. From there I've been stationed all over; including Hawaii, California, South Korea, and too much time in the Persian Gulf region (Saudi, Kuwait, bahrain, Iraq). I got out as E6 for "personality differences" as I like to refer to it. One of my last duties was controlling classifed materials for the unit; and I was no one's friend. If you didn't follow the regulations; I'd call ya on it. The general and company CO didn't like a "non-team player" and made it impossible for me to reenlist. I enjoyed my time in the military and would do it over again...the last day of active duty and report submitted to JAG. I've met some very nice people and learned alot from all the different cultures; which have guided me in the things I do here on the homestead.
     
  11. dalilies

    dalilies Well-Known Member

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    Opps, never checked in here because I was thinking a veteran of homesteading life, like a place for old timers to get away from newbies. :eek:

    I server in the Navy from 91-95. I got to spend 2 summers in Florida, 1 winter in Alaska, a year in Seattle, and 2 years in Norfolk. Loved all of it except for having to leave the family. They let me play with torpedoes. I was stationed on a subtender, the USS LY Spear.It is probably decommissioned by now.
    Last position I filled was in charge of inventory. That was fun. I got to go onto the subs during weapon moves. Women have no business being stationed on subs. Way too small of a space for mixed company. It was a challenge to keep track of every component during moves and keep all the serial numbers straight, but I liked it.

    Hubby spent 4 years in the Air Force,86-90, all of it at Dover. He was a Jet Engine Machanic working the night shift. I tease him about how easy he had it.

    You bet, I would do it again. Hubby and I even talked about it at the beginning of this war. With 3 kids, we decided to wait to see how things went, but if the war went real bad, and troops were needed, we decided I would re-enlist. He is too old now. They wouldn't take him.

    Jennifer
     
  12. twstanley

    twstanley Well-Known Member

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    Jennifer, if you are prior service, you can generally reenlist clear into your 50s. Initial enlistments have an upper age limited of 37 I think it is now, at least for the army.

    I joined the national guard in 1983, got called up during Desert Storm but just went out to Ft Riley and did the post police work for 7 months and was in until 1993, made it to E-6 then got out as my civilian career was taking more time and my wife at the time really wanted me to get out.

    After 9/11 I reenlisted as an E-5 back into the same unit, some of the same guys were still there. We were called up to guard an ammo plant ( Lake City ) for 10 months, then called back up to go to Iraq after 6 months back i n the civilian world. I spent 7 months in Baghdad doing patrols with the Iraqi Police. We got back home in January 2004, my enlistement was up in May 2004 and I didn't reenlist as I wanted to stay home and have a family as well as the financial repercussions of being called up we are still paying for and will be for several years.
     
  13. Southernman

    Southernman Well-Known Member

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    I enlisted in 1992 as field artillery. Was stationed in South Korea, Ft.Bragg NC, and Hawaii. Reclassed to transportation and did a little over 3 at Ft. Hood Tx. Little over 13 years total. Was deployed to Iraq for the invasion from Jan-July 2003. Then back again from Feb-June 2004. Glad I went ahead and got out, get to spend more time with my family. Don't regret any of it tho.
     
  14. heather

    heather Well-Known Member

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    wow - i have never been to this forum before - don't really belong :)

    but my brother is an AF vet & currently in the Army training at Ft. Bragg

    so, i thought i'd stop in & read your stories

    i must say i'm impressed

    "thank you" seems like little in return, but i'm so proud of my brother & i'm thankful for others, like you, who take the time & energy to be away from family & friends to serve this country

    you deserve all the benefits you receive AND more

    blessings to you all -

    PS - it's interesting how your service time & lessons learned are serving you well in your thoughts/life of homesteading
     
  15. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    76 basic Knox and Benning
    76-79 FRG 1/1 Cav
    79-80 Polk 5th Inf
    80-present all digits intact, kids and grandkids and a growing homestead.
     
  16. heather

    heather Well-Known Member

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    glad to hear about your digits! :D
     
  17. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

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    joined reserves (army) 93, went active less than a month after my ait, spent 5 yrs at fort polk, LA. was a unit supply specialist for a med unit (ground ambulance) and then at the airfield. got put out on a medical board for chronic back problems, later found out to be a torn disk, non-repairable and degenerative. would i do it again? in a stinking heartbeat. what i learned in the army has helped me deal with everything else that has happened to me in the last few years, and made me a much stronger, more confident person.
     
  18. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    Joined the army june 96 after highschool and a year of college aged 20 from lived in the marshall islands since I was just about 16.Went to Jackson south carolina and gordon georgia Served 3 years in germany 6 months at the border of Kosovo and Albaina in 99.Ets'ed in 2000 had always dreamed of a homestead saved every penny of my army pay and went back to the marshall islands with 54,000 in the stock market 34k of my own the rest profit lost about all.went back to college got a elementary ed degree taught 3 years hey wait a min this is not suppose to be a biography!I am based on a little homestead in AR now I rent it from the bank.I am preparing for a national guard deployment to Kosovo now I should have the funds to buy a nice piece of Land out right when I get back in the ozarks and build a simple house for my family probably log cabin/strawbale.
     
  19. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ohhhhhhhh yea, partial to my digits!
     
  20. BillHoo

    BillHoo Well-Known Member

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    Funny you should mention yoouor digits. One of the reasons I left the active component was because I noticed a really large number of people in my platoon had missing finger tips, deep scars, and at least one had half his face burned off by battery acid.

    Reason for all these injuries? Poor safety practices and that fact that the equipment we use is inherently unsafe when compaired with what is used in the civilian world.

    On at least one occasion, I nearly had my hand chopped off when someone dropped a pallet with a half ton of equipment on it! Luckily, there were several two by fours on the deck of the truck that prevented this. Instead, my wrist was badly bruised.

    Yes, I like my digits too. Now, I just have to stay out of the way of the rocket attacks the bad guys keep sending my way. They just missed me again this morning! Nyeah!