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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please :D

Ever since I read about Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats I have wanted some but reading about something on google and actually hearing from people who have had them is way different.

I wont ask actual questions as I really just want to hear what you think of them and stories you have about them to start adn then I will get to actual questions.

Thanks :cool:
 

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What are the discrepencies on NDs between your reading and peoples' experiences?
You will generally find much passion from ND owners. I've not had the standard sized goats so I'm sure you'll get more insight from owners who have both as they can compare and contrast.
I find nigies the best creatures to be around. Mine for the most part are quiet (except around meal times!), friendly, all different personalities. They can be great milkers for their size if you search around and because of their size more can be kept on less acreage. You can tote them around in a car and most are easily handled. They are being utilized more and more as therapy animals too. And their wide color pallette is always fun at kidding time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry, thats what I get for trying to do 12 things at once LOL

I didnt mean there were discrepincies, just that things like "breed standards for...." and 101 goat breeds dont have the kinds of first hand information I want.

"Does good with children" from a breed standard site and "dont let the beggers near anything shiney or they will peck the eyes out of your head!" from someone with (incert name of poltry here) springs to mind though LOL

I have 3 young children and a hubby who isnt that keen on animals so sneaking anything into the pack is a bit tricky so things like price of feed and how much milk do they actually give and the like and just general stories from people who have them, are they fun to have sort of things really.

Oooops, there goes the pasta all over the stove!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Actually, having read the "What goat?" thread I read quite a few posts about Nigerians lol and learned abit about them as well :D

Oh, one question though, are they hard to keep inside a boundry? I read all the time about how hard it is to keep goats confined.

I am mostly trying to distract myself from the painting adn cleaning I have to do now but I have seen pictures of ND's and like the look of them but reading a bit on line I keep coming across people who say they dont have much milk or the teats are too small and the like.

Do they live up to the name of Dairy Goat, are they as cute and funny as the pictures look, is the milk good, are they friendly, that sort of thing. OH, and your favorite Nigerian Dwarf story :D

And here I am NOT PAINTING some more LOL
 

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Well, in my experience, they are not hard to confine if you have the proper enclosures, HOWEVER, goats in general are little stinkers! And mine are jumpers. I have seen a nearly full-grown ND doe (first-freshener) leap over a 5' shear wall!!! Usually it's the babies that are jumpers, though. Some of my stinkers were jumping over the 3.5-foot pen walls at the Fair to get from their pen to momma. Makes it hard to keep those udders full when the babies sneak over to take a nip!!!

They are SUPPOSED to be dairy goats but yes, they will get wooly in the winter.

The milk ROCKS but you have to handle it carefully and be very clean, as with any milk. It is EXTREMELY high in butterfat if the doe is healthy and well-fed. One of my does is always over 7.5% butterfat on test and this last time she posted 10.8% on official test!!! For comparison, whole cow milk in the store is about 4%.

Goats all have different personalities but yes, mine are friendly. This is in part due to their natural personality, in part due to their mother's personality, and in part due to how I handle them and how much time I spend with them. Mine are all lovebugs. A couple are less willing to approach on their own, but once you catch them and calm them, they are very sweet. These rambunctious few are goats that are still fairly new to me, though. Give them time and they will mostly come around and want to come for attention as much as the others. Then there are the pocket goats, the ones that are practically velcroed to you. Ask me how I know, lol! A couple have bad habits of wanting to climb on me or they like to suck or chew on my clothes to get my attention. Can you tell they were raised here? But yep, dam-raised and in fact even though they were born in May & June, they are still on their mommas.
 

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Nigerian Dwarf's are the cutest little goats you will ever see! (Although Nubian's are a close second- and no offense to you other goat owners!) I have had Alpines and Nubian's before, and I currently have a little herd of Nigerian Dwarfs. The milk IS really GOOD, and I think it depends on if you get a good goat as to whether they give good amounts of milk. They can give a lot, like what I have heard, is they eat about a third of the amount of food as a regular sized goat (seems about right to me), take a third of the space (yes!) and can give half the amount of milk (still working on that).
Most goats do have nice personalities, but Nigies are SO sweet. At least mine are. They also like to tease me too. One little white buck I have (who isn't so little anymore) always squeezes through the most amazingly small places- and there is like no reasonable way he could! My brother said I should have named him Houdini. Speaking of, breeding season just passed, and I was trying to breed this little white buck (named Lorenzo)- to a doe (Blossom). Well, for like a week before Blossom came into heat, I put her in with Lorenzo to be sure that I didn't miss her coming into heat. Well, she always butted him. Finally, she came into heat, and Lorenzo had just come in from the pasture. I put them together, and they sniffed each other. Blossom stood wagging her tail, waiting. Lorenzo went up to her, sniffed her rear end and then stood there looking like he was falling asleep! His eyes were closing, and Blossom started whacking him in the face with her tail, like wake up!!:zzz: Well, by the time Blossom went out of heat, she still was not bred.:grit: Lorenzo tried, he really did, but, I just don't think he knew what to do. He is only 7 months old. Oh well, hopefully next month!
My little black doeling Harp, who is amazingly cute, once tried to take the barn cat on. Rearing up she stood ready to butt him, I only wish I had, had my camera with me. She always climbs in the grass/hay crate to eat it. Doesn't taste good unless she's sitting in it I guess.
I totally agree with Nigerians being therapeutic too. When ever I come in from chores I feel so refreshed. Just watching them eat, run, jump, come up to me, maa, it is very relaxing.
Alright, I guess I don't want to write a book here:), just wanted to let you know that Nigerian Dwarf's are a very good choice!!!
 

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I have 1/2 ND 1/2 Pygmy twins. I also have their mama who is the Pygmy. I love them to pieces...they are full of personality and a joy to be around. They were Dam raised but I spent a lot of time with them and now they think they have 2 moms. They come when I call and baaaaa at me when they see me. They snuggle. Mine don't try to escape when they are in a pen...they do free roam the property most of the day and prefer to hang out by the kitchen door. They do jump on cars when they get a chance and come running whenever anyone pulls in the driveway. The love the UPS man and going in his truck. They are easy to take care of...Mine are pets and I don't milk. I can't imagine life without them :)
 

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I have a doe, Mimi who is 1/2 Nigerian, 1/2 Nubian. She's sweet and fun to have. I've had purebred Nigies in the past who were dam raised and not handled enough so they were wild. I made sure to handle Mimi alot when she was a kid and it's made all the difference. She's due to freshen in March and I plan to milk her. She should have milk that's high in butterfat. I like that she's taller than the purebred NDs because she'll fit in my milk stand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Lovely way to start the morning, HAPPY animal stories :D

I read about Nigerians quite a long time ago but the breed never made it to Ireland and has been interbred with pygmies in England so doesnt exist as a breed anymore so for at least 3 years I have been trying to save enough money to import 5 or 6 to Ireland but it seems like every time I got close something cropped up to eat up my savings :mad: But now we are at teh last little bit of our move to Florida (9 days and counting) it suddenly occured to me I will be able to get some at last :banana 02: as soon as we get out of rental and into our own property, that is, sigh, still a little bit to wait :mad:

So instead of the usual info on a breed I thought I would ask from people who have them what they are like and are they as fun as they look and will they help justify their keep with the mister with a definant milk production that saves money at the shop.

Guess the answer to all the above is yes :cool:

A few more goat stories wouldnt go astray though :D LOL
 

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Well I raise registered Nigerians and I also have Alpines, Nubians, Mini Alpines and La Manchas...I love all of them and their different personalities...Each breed is different and the colors are wonderful. I have had 1/2 pygmys also and they are very hardy. I have unregistered and registered and I dont see any difference. Nigi's are Great and so are all the others. I am still looking for a Saanen to add so its getting closer to where I might have all different types and even some Toggs also. Who knows...I know the larger breed is easier to milk but some Nigis can give up to a gallon a day milk wise. So I think it all depends on how much land you have and time. To me All goats are GREAT!!
 

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They really are as fun as they look and they're every bit as cute in real life, if not cuter. My boys were dam raised, but even now they're 70 pounds, they jump in my lap and settle down for a little cud chewing. They know what time I get home in the evenings, and they're always standing on their picnic table at that time, looking for all the world like shipwrecked sailors searching for sight of land:D And then...AHOY!...they spy me at the end of the driveway and start to maaa until I change clothes and get out to their pasture. Then we run around the yard and the boys kick their heels and do all sorts of aerial acrobatics while I feed them raisins.

Minelson said it well. I can't imagine life without them, either :D
 

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My favorite time is sitting out in the pen with the goats and watching them get a wild hair and leap off something, twisting in the air. It's cute to see the babies do this but even funnier to see an adult. I just love it when they get all excited and playful!

Funniest story... hmmm... the only one coming to mind right now, although it wasn't funny at the time, is the one to which I alluded earlier with the doe jumping the 5-foot shear wall. She did it TWICE. Little stinker. This was one of my first goats. She was a first-freshener last year and had been with me for a handful of weeks. The buck had joined us a few weeks prior and he was in his pen next to the doe pen. One day I was outdoors doing chores and I was preoccupied with something. I had the tops of the dutch doors open on both stalls. My husband came home and said, "Oh, so you decided to put Waiting in with Chesire after all." I thought he was joking and sarcastically said, "Yeah." He went on to say something else and I slowly realized he was NOT kidding. I said, "Wait, what do you mean?" He said Waiting was in with Chesire and I denied it, sort of trying to get him to admit he was trying to get me worked up. He insisted, Waiting was indeed in the buck's stall. I screamed, "WHAT?! WELL GET HER OUTTA THERE!" We then proceeded to put her back in her pen, do the obligatory "butt check" and HOPE to heck she wasn't bred. It wouldn't have hurt anything, but it was not when I wanted to breed her. (It turned out she wasn't bred.) Anyway, we then proceeded to watch the little stink fly right back over the 5' high sheer wall that is her bottom dutch door out into the outdoor yard and then over the bucks' same door to get into his pen. Needless to say, the tops of the dutch doors do not stay open anymore unless we are supervising and even then, only one at a time is left open, not both!
 

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Here's another funny I remembered the other day. :)

Last winter one of my bucklings came into the house for a little visit while I was under the weather (now THAT'S an understanding husband, lol!). When it was time for him to go back outside, my husband put him on a leash and started out toward the barn. My husband was also towing a sled, which Xenya thought looked like a lot of fun so he hopped in, while it was moving, and stayed therein until he made it to the barn. I was laughing my butt off from the house, watching this. I never expected the goat to 1) jump in a moving sled and 2) not fall over or try to get out as soon as he realized it was moving!

I guess when they got to the barn, Xenya just looked up at my husband as if to say, "Oh, the ride's over? Bummer. Ok then!" and he hopped out. Way too funny! I wonder if he'd try this now? :cute:
 
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