Teeth...

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by MrsFarmerWilly, Jul 29, 2006.

  1. MrsFarmerWilly

    MrsFarmerWilly Well-Known Member

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    Several weeks back I found one of my female New Zealands had bit down on a wire in her cage trapping her in place when she couldn't work her teeth back out. It came down to freeing her took removal of her right upper front tooth. Now I notice that the bottom right tooth is protrubing from her lip. We looked at it yesterday and the right upper is coming back in. The left upper and lower are normal size. It is just the one tooth. What can I do? Any help you can offer will be much appreciated. This is my first try at raising rabbits and they have won over my heart so I want to take top notch care of them....in other words any other information you can offer will be appreciated also.
    Thanks
    MFW
     
  2. Pat Lamar

    Pat Lamar Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, this may take some time and there's no guarantee that it will work. It has, however, worked for some.

    It will be important to handle your rabbit as much as possible. Every time you pick up the rabbit, apply some pressure on that bottom tooth to help force it back into place. Don't apply so much that it can break the tooth off, though.

    Wishing you luck!

    Pat Lamar
    President
    Professional Rabbit Meat Association
    http://www.prma.org/
    Chairperson, ARBA Commercial Department Committee
     

  3. MrsFarmerWilly

    MrsFarmerWilly Well-Known Member

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    The tooth is in alignment with the other lower tooth. It is just about a quarter inch longer than the other bottom. She hasn't been able to chew on that side due to the upper tooth having been removed. A new tooth is in, but I don't know what to do with the long one.
     
  4. Pat Lamar

    Pat Lamar Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Don't know how acceptable this will be to you... we always used wire cutters to trim the teeth. Some prefer to use a drexal tool.

    Pat Lamar
     
  5. MrsFarmerWilly

    MrsFarmerWilly Well-Known Member

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    OK that sounds like the way we are going to have to go. Would you mind walking out the steps with me on how to do this? And do I leave it up to her to file down any sharps or barbs? Thank you so much for your help. OH! And while I have your attention, are there any routine meds or vitamins I should be giving them? Thanks again.
     
  6. Pat Lamar

    Pat Lamar Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've only used wire cutters, so I don't know about the drexal tool. Naturally, it will take two people to do this... one to hold the rabbit and the other to use the wire cutters.

    For the person holding the rabbit, it's easier if you can lay her on her back on a table (use a piece of carpet on the table so she won't slide). You can then hold her in place with your body by leaning over her and keeping the hind legs behind you. Hold her head in place with a firm grip on the base of the ears with a hand UNDER her head. With the free hand, spread the lips as much as possible. Snip the tooth. Yes, the rabbit will struggle, but will be very appreciative afterwards. Snip off any obvious sharps or barbs. She will take care of the rest.

    We had a doe who trapped her teeth in the wire, too. Since we knew the malocclusion wasn't a genetic fault, we kept her and simply trimmed her teeth every two months. She got so she would come to the front of the cage and bare her teeth to show us that they needed trimming, again! LOL She was a very friendly doe, so we knew what she was doing.

    Pat Lamar
     
  7. Pat Lamar

    Pat Lamar Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Oops... I forgot the second question.

    So long as the rabbit is receiving the proper nutrition, there shouldn't be any need for medications and/or vitamins. Why fix what ain't broke?

    Pat Lamar
     
  8. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For those ever needing the information, a pair of diagonal cutters worked just fine. Rabbit didn't flinch when I clipped off the tooth, matter of fact it had more problems being wrapped in a towel than having the tooth clipped. I clipped it short enough the first time, but needed to be straightened up a bit, so clipped again. Lord, next time I won't even take it out of the cage, just pet it, raise lips and clip away.
     
  9. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That's great, Mrs. Farmer Willy, that it worked so well. It is certainly useful to know how to trim a rabbit's teeth.... I think, however, that if one of my rabbits had its teeth caught on the cage wire, I would prefer to snip the wire, not the tooth. One can always patch the cage.
     
  10. MrsFarmerWilly

    MrsFarmerWilly Well-Known Member

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    That would have been our preference also, however, by the time the doe was found she had been so stressed that the tooth was loose to the point of almost falling out when she was freed from the wire. So it was a matter of pulling it the rest of the way and working with the follow up care as it came due.
     
  11. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ah, that makes sense! Poor thing... It must have been terrifying for her. Glad she is okay now.
     
  12. BJ

    BJ Well-Known Member

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    It's easy to use a dremel tool with a small sanding disc. You can file the tooth down quickly and even angle it. This is much better than clipping which can leave a jagged edge or even crack the tooth. Just keep an eye on it as the teeth grow very quickly.