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Discussion Starter #1
Hello-
I'm usually in the goat and fiber section. But my daughter has a couple Lion Heads that she has bred. One of her four month (?) olds that she retained for breeding has a problem with its teeth. We are relatively new to this so didn't notice - with everything else to learn - that the rabbit had fur wrapped on its bottom teeth. Removing that showed the bottom front teeth to be in front of the top teeth and almost touching the top of the mouth....really long and the top teeth are over grown also. I know this will cause feeding problems (already is. probably).
So what can we do for it? My daughter thinks that it happened cause the hair was on it but :shrug:
Can the teeth be clipped? Filed? Will they ever be right?
She doesn't want to think of it but does it have to be put down?
Not much meat on a lion head :shrug: . She will hate me when she reads that.

OK. I read a few past threads...Don't know if its 'wolf teeth' as we didn't look at them before. It had been chewing it's cage alot until I had my daughter bring the cage down to the porch so it wasn't bored. Looks like we should clip them using one of the tools reccomended. So how long should they be?

Thanks again
Pam

thanks for any info you can give,
Pam
 

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Well, sounds like malccolusion (sp?) - a misalignment of the teeth. I have never personally had to deal with it, but I have heard that you can snip them down with a small pair of wire clippers. As long as she eats her food and you don't let her teeth grow too long she should be fine. :)

Good luck!
 

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Duchess of Cynicism
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I think trim the teeth back to a good working length, then see if the malocclussion happens again. If it does, the rabbit needs to be culled from the breeding program. If not, then the hair may have caused the problem-- check daily to prevent it from happening again.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info. I also read all that I could in the past threads and we will be clipping them down. Looks like this one will be someones pet for cheep if it recovers and they are willing to take it knowing what to watch for.
I think I will stick with goats and convince my daughter to relocate her rabbits when she goes to college soon. I don't know enough about them and since she has been getting ready for college she hasn't had as much time for them as she should, anyway. She will be sad but we can't neglect thier health. They aren't meat rabbits, just pets.

Pam
 
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