Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Sock puppet reinstated
Joined
·
23,689 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

"Teens appear to have have fared better in overall mental health than adults during the COVID-19 pandemic — despite fears that a generation of adolescents already battling higher-than-normal levels of depression and loneliness would suffer more because of quarantine, enforced online classes, separation from friends and related challenges.

That’s according to a report released Tuesday morning by Brigham Young University’s Wheatley Institution and the Institute for Family Studies. In “Teens in Quarantine: Mental Health, Screen Time and Family Connection,” researchers compared findings from the 2018 “Monitoring the Future” survey of eighth, 10th and 12th graders with a comparable group of 1,523 teens surveyed mid-pandemic, expecting to find elevated mental distress.

Instead, the study led by San Diego State University psychologist Jean Twenge, author of “iGen,” and BYU professor Sarah Coyne found that depression and loneliness had decreased somewhat during the coronavirus quarantine, compared to levels in pre-pandemic 2018. Unhappiness and dissatisfaction with life rose slightly."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,840 Posts
Our little world would contradict that opinion piece.
Our two sons were chomping at the bit to get to college and on with their lives.
Our daughter and son in law have adapted per their area but haven't surrendered to the fear and isolation and quit paying attention to any more studies and press releases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,022 Posts
Over all that's probably true. As a teen I was always trying to find ways to have some quiet time. Now days it is even easier to connect with friends online and the pandemic gives then an excuse to be alone for alone time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,022 Posts
Our little world would contradict that opinion piece.
Our two sons were chomping at the bit to get to college and on with their lives.
Our daughter and son in law have adapted per their area but haven't surrendered to the fear and isolation and quit paying attention to any more studies and press releases.
My niece got quarantined right off the bat at Georgetown. She is a freshman and was livid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
The lack of in person school and there change in social life has stressed out a lot of teens, but some parents are not as strict as we have been. I see kids out playing in groups every time I'm out in public. My kids have only went out in public a few times to go shopping.

I'm much more stressed as I went from working 32 hours every 2 weeks to working 80 to 120 hours every 2 weeks. I'm working to many hours to get everything done on the homestead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,116 Posts
Over all that's probably true. As a teen I was always trying to find ways to have some quiet time. Now days it is even easier to connect with friends online and the pandemic gives then an excuse to be alone for alone time.
Back in my youth there wasn't this thing called cellphone. I would be wading a creek fishing or hunting. Nobody knew exactly where I might be... I still got the cabin if I need a break!....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts

"Teens appear to have have fared better in overall mental health than adults during the COVID-19 pandemic — despite fears that a generation of adolescents already battling higher-than-normal levels of depression and loneliness would suffer more because of quarantine, enforced online classes, separation from friends and related challenges.

That’s according to a report released Tuesday morning by Brigham Young University’s Wheatley Institution and the Institute for Family Studies. In “Teens in Quarantine: Mental Health, Screen Time and Family Connection,” researchers compared findings from the 2018 “Monitoring the Future” survey of eighth, 10th and 12th graders with a comparable group of 1,523 teens surveyed mid-pandemic, expecting to find elevated mental distress.

Instead, the study led by San Diego State University psychologist Jean Twenge, author of “iGen,” and BYU professor Sarah Coyne found that depression and loneliness had decreased somewhat during the coronavirus quarantine, compared to levels in pre-pandemic 2018. Unhappiness and dissatisfaction with life rose slightly."

I'd hazard a guess as to what might be going on to cause these results: Students are being put in less confrontational situations with peers. There's less pressure to worry about what other kids think of you if they can't stand there and make fun of your hair, make-up, or how fat you are. There's no need to worry about being chastised in front of everyone when you're rolling out of bed and into a computer. If someone's bothering you, you can literally just cut them off and walk away and they can't follow you. Nobody's getting mean candid pictures of you.

There's probably a lot of 'extracurriculars' that got cancelled that have always contributed to overall stress for kids (pre-dawn swimming, cheerleading, competitive supports). While kids might like these things and they're fun, I think parents in general have let their kids overstack their schedules between sports, school, socializing, and trying to work.


Back in my youth there wasn't this thing called cellphone. I would be wading a creek fishing or hunting. Nobody knew exactly where I might be... I still got the cabin if I need a break!....
I'm just a millennial and I didn't have a cell phone, either. That wasn't a thing until I was firmly in college.

I was a homebody so I didn't go disappearing, but I was also an only child and pretty much left to my own devices.

I can't comprehend how kids have become SO reliant on being connected and communicating 24-7. Of course that would be stressful.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,030 Posts
Audacity, that is a lot of what I was thinking. Kids have less confrontation and stress by not going into a building filled with, um, other not so nice people looking for someone to pick on. Parents are not as stressed with work, household duties and running here and there. There is more opportunity for families to be families now.

Of course there are kids who have problems learning via computer. They should be given the opportunity to learn in person.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top