Teen Mother

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Jcran, Sep 10, 2017.

  1. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,654
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    Location:
    Eureka, California area
    My daughter traded "up" for a May1,2016 club calf heifer. It appears she is bred. The previous owner is a meticulous record keeper and has a date on his calendar where she jumped the fence and was in with a bull for the afternoon while no one was home. If that date was the only time, it would put her due to calve at the end of November. She is a growthy heifer but a November calf would mean she was calving at 18 months old! Can anyone tell me if they've ever had something that young calve out safely? One rancher friend thinks she's fine but I'd rather lutalyse than lose a cow
     
  2. G. Seddon

    G. Seddon Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,036
    Joined:
    May 16, 2005
    Location:
    VA
    Most likely she will be fine, depending on the type of bull that bred her. (It's odd that "a meticulous record keeper" would not have opted to abort the pregnancy at the time.) It's unlikely that she's not pregnant, but the vet could tell you for sure. You should also ask your vet's advice about terminating at this point in time.
     
    Ronney and Jcran like this.

  3. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

    Messages:
    19,467
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2003
    Truth if she was bread by a Black Angus I wouldn't worry at all.

    big rockpile
     
  4. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    12,849
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2006
    Location:
    Northern Michigan (U.P.)
    017.JPG
    Breed of the bull is an important factor. However, not all Angus bulls produce small calves. When selecting bulls or AI straws, calving ease is a major consideration for breeding heifers. Terminate pregnancy or get ready to pull the calf, alive, dead or in pieces.
     
    G. Seddon, Ronney and Jcran like this.
  5. barnbilder

    barnbilder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,002
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2005
    Location:
    va
    Most club calves have a good chunk of shorthorn in them. Shorthorns are usually large in the pelvis and very capable of having a young elephant with no problems. The problem comes in when you get into the Maine Anjou stuff, and sometimes a dash of Chi that can give you 125 pound birth weights in some of the clubby stuff. Throw in a little simmy and it doesn't help either, depending on the simmy. If she jumped in a with a clubby bull, there could be trouble. That said, I've had two shorthorn heifers calve unassisted at 15 to 17 months. Mine are not clubby, just production animals, and every once in a while, they get bred by a herd bull while they are still on the cow. Just a product of the high fertility of the breed. Usually an advantage that club heifers would have is an accelerated feeding program, so they get a good bit of growth early. Pumping the feed during pregnancy could be bad, if the heifer is overly fat, and has a big calf growing too, then that could be bad. I would definitely keep an eye on her, but it is definitely not necessarily a death sentence for her. I would inquire as to what she jumped the fence with. If it was a low birth weight Angus, I wouldn't worry much at all.
     
  6. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,654
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    Location:
    Eureka, California area
    Two bulls in the pasture...a chi-Maine club calf sire and a low birthweight Hereford heifer bull. And the heifer is half Charolais, dam had two sets of twins before her. Breeder warned us she prolly needed to be luted. Our fault not his. We tossed her out to pasture when we got her and she was wild so we put it off then "forgot". I'll add short video of her with our limousin meat steer from the other day

    IMG_4740.mp4.mov
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2017
  7. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,738
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Joan, that is the type of situation where there are no if's, but's or maybe's for me. I've twice bought in a heifer that had turned out to be in calf too young and once the completely wrong breeding - Jersey to Simmental. In both cases I got the vet out, he did an internal and was able to give me a rough idea on the growth of the calf and what to expect. After discussion, I made the decision to induce because I would rather have a live cow and a dead calf than take the risk of losing both. In each case there was a premature calf that survived - and the Jersey/Simmental became a huge cow that I still have and milk her. The money spent on the vet and his input was money well invested.

    On the other hand, both cows may well have calved without problems but I'll never know and wasn't about to take that risk for the sake of a couple of 100 dollars in vet bills. That has been more than paid back since. And Haypoint's photo is one I have seen to often on other farms and once on my own. Not fun having to pull a calf, or even worse, cut it up into bits to save the mother.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
    Jcran, G. Seddon and haypoint like this.
  8. barnbilder

    barnbilder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,002
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2005
    Location:
    va
    All comes down to size of the heifer, and more importantly the distance in her hips. Many a pinched hip two year old that should have become hamburger has calving issues, even bred to a "heifer" bull. Cows retained out of heifer bulls can be especially bad. Little and narrow begets little and narrow. But chi-maine chaorlais crossed stuff in the club world can have notoriously huge calves, calves too big for any cow to have without risking an assist here and there. It all comes down to how bad you want to gamble. At least you have a date to work with, that is a plus.
     
    Jcran and G. Seddon like this.
  9. hiddensprings

    hiddensprings Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    917
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Location:
    Minnesota
    We had neighbors that had a feedlot cattle operation. Usually once or twice a year, they would end up with a too young heifer having her first calf at their place. The only problem they ran into was the young lady not wanting to be a momma.....if that happened, I got a phone call that said "are you still raising bottle calves? if so, we have one for you." I agree with the others though, have your vet come out and take a look at her.
     
  10. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,654
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    Location:
    Eureka, California area
    Thank you. Vet will be out next week to palpate
     
  11. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,738
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Joan, has the vet been yet? I have to remember it's only Wednesday for you, not Thursday as it is for me so he/she may not have been.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  12. MO_cows

    MO_cows I calls em like I sees em

    Messages:
    12,395
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2010
    Location:
    W Mo
    We had it happen a few times and in all cases the calf was born unassisted and the heifer wanted to mother it and had enough milk. But that was a maternal breed, Tarentaise.

    I would not terminate the pregnancy this close to term. I would watch her like a hawk and keep the vet on speed dial. And especially, don't over feed her.
     
    Jcran likes this.
  13. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,654
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    Location:
    Eureka, California area
    Vet coming out week of Oct 1...had emergency call out and cancelled our appt. I had two friends who breed angus and Hereford take a look and they THINK she's big/wide enough but agree a palpation is in order. Their suggestion is for a November 9 induction, two weeks prior to calving date based on previous experience etc but agree that vet experience/diagnosis is paramount. I will definitely post when she/he comes out next week
     
    Ronney likes this.