technical colleges?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by beginnerfarmer, Dec 30, 2005.

  1. beginnerfarmer

    beginnerfarmer Well-Known Member

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    Hello guys, I am wondering what ur take on technical colleges? I am planning on attend my local technical college, for cabinetmaking. what do u guys think?
     
  2. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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  3. TamInAz

    TamInAz Well-Known Member

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    Just be Very, very careful about the school you pick!!! Do Not take out loans to attend based on "bright job prospects"!!!!

    Research future earnings, if you're going into it for the money. If you're going into it to learn practical skills...make sure to research the qualifications of the teachers and that you'll be taught by highly skilled instructors. Been there, been Burned.

    Good luck to you!!!
     
  4. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    I agree. Education has become a bit of a racket in recent years. IT schools are probably the worst. Talk to successful cabinet makers that are not affiliated with any schools and ask them how they learned their trade. I think working as an apprentice is the best way to learn a trade. The next best is probably going it alone, first building a reputation for honesty based on good character and hard work, and developing better skills over time. There are no short cuts.
     
  5. TamInAz

    TamInAz Well-Known Member

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    Oh my, I didn't specify in my early post because I get ----ed off too easily on the subject...but I can't Tell you the # or people in the area we used to live in that got burned Big Time w/the IT school "raquet"!!! <I am Not admitting I got burned in it ....grrrrrr>

    Amen on Apprenticeship!!!! Yes, some things require a certificate, etc. but there are Still many things where apprenticeship is the way to go.

    My 14 yr. old's dream is to someday own his own car garage (I'm ignorant here..this is dh's area) he's been learning from dh since he was 5 rebuilding all parts of cars and complete cars. When it's time for him to go for what it takes to get a great job and work his way up we'll be Carefully researching vo-tech schools and Extensively interviewing.
     
  6. cowboy joe

    cowboy joe Hired Hand

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    I give you credit for having the ambition to pursue an education. I have a couple of thoughts for you:

    - visit the college, talk to the students and look at some of their work. Most will be only to happy to do a little bragging. The students will know the inside story, especially the ones ready to graduate. They'll also have the scoop on the types of jobs / availability of jobs once you finish the program.

    - look at the tuition & all the fees. How long will it take you pay off any loans you take out based upon what you expect to earn?

    - look at the curriculum. Are there a lot of fluff courses or will you really get a solid education in your chosen field?

    - check the credentials of the instructors. Did they learn from a book or did they make a living from it? (I teach in the technolgies division at a community college - you'd be surprised how many never practiced what they preach!)

    - do they have a co-op program where you can apprentice with a craftperson? No book can compete with the teachings of those who make a living with their craft.

    Good luck to you in your endeavors. Keep us posted.
     
  7. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    IMHO, forget the tech school. I went that route and ended up regretting it. At the tech school you will learn how to build the cabinets, but not the business end of it.

    If school is what you want instead of an apprenticeship go to a Jumior College that has a woodworking program. Combine that with business classes and you will end up with a better, well rounded education that can take you farther than working for someone else the rest of you life.

    TamInAz - I'd give the same adive to your 14y.o. Fixing cars is the easy part of running a garage.
     
  8. bachelorb

    bachelorb Well-Known Member

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    I have to agree. In Alabama, Junior Colleges are the way to go. Calhoun CC had a cabinetmaking class and you could take business classes too. I think the tuition is cheaper than the private technical schools. I ended up with a drafting technical degree and then finished up with the business classes. It worked out well.
     
  9. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

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    I think the correct path depends a lot on the locality.

    Junior college for some, tech school for others.

    The problem with aprrenticing to somebody good, somebody really good, is that you are going to have to work for free, or pay them. In our area, we have a master craftsman - cabinets to fine furniture - and he charges you to apprentice.

    I think if the tech school is decent, it gets your foot in the door in an established shop. With the frenzy in construction today, nobody has the time to train people in the basics.
     
  10. beginnerfarmer

    beginnerfarmer Well-Known Member

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    I agree with u guys. I have been thinking when I finish tech school, I going to a community college to get a degree in business, since I wont own my own cabientmaking business some day!
     
  11. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    in my area most of the subjects that some would consider tech such as auto body refrigeration etc etc are offered by the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Bevill community College or Wallace State. I would take any of their classes with confidence. but some of the other independent tech schools can be a big ripoff so be careful and stick to the tech courses at actual colleges and not some company out of new york etc in the local strip mall etc.
     
  12. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Do some research first. Many tech schools are training mills for the local plants. To get a job at some of the plants they want you to attend the tech school and then they'll hire you. Most of the classes are just full of people that would rather be somewhere else, including the instructor. I went for an evening class in machine shop and it was a waste of time and money. instructor sat reading something while class filled out papers and took open book tests to show they attended. I never got near a machine and didn't take the tests as I wasn't there to get a job at the plant.
     
  13. beginnerfarmer

    beginnerfarmer Well-Known Member

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  14. beowoulf90

    beowoulf90 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There are some good words of wisdom in the posts already.

    Check all the schools, I found that the ITT tech schools didn't make the grade, and the local junior colleges didn't offer what I was looking for, and also the price was a problem for me. I did finally settle for a local tech school and am pleased with the training and the costs.
    Don't expect them to find you a job, that is up to you!! Some schools make those claims and most are false. They may help and give you leads, but don't count on it.

    Last but not least, make sure it is something you want to do.
     
  15. I would have to disagree with some of the folks here. I would say go for it if that is the trade you would like to do. A peice of paper stating that you completed so many hours doesn't necessarily make you smarter then someone who has never attended a technical school. But, there could come a time that you who has a peice of paper may have to compete for a job opening against someone who doesn't own a certificate and that peice of paper may be what gets you the job.

    Also take the advice of checking out several schools. The technical school I attended taught you several aspects of the trade. From Math to Business as well as the technical part of the coarse chosen. The school also set up job interviews with some very outstanding companies across the state and country. The technical college I attended was Oklahoma State University Technical School of Okmulgee.
     
  16. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have to disagree too with those against tech schools. My husband went to a little tech school in Cambridge, MA and he's done quite well coming from there.;)