tear up ceramic tile

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by GeorgeK, Aug 28, 2005.

  1. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    how does one tear up ceramic tile without damaging the adjacent tiles? When my house was built, the tile people talked us into this "new way" of putting down tile "to make the floor stronger" so the one foot tiles wouldn't crack over time. Well the new way actually worsened it, we are now six years out and so I think the problem has hit it's end and is no longer progressing. Joists are sistered 2x12's 16 inches on center, then subflooring is yellow pine planks, then a layer of thinset, then 3/4 inch plywood boxscrewed every 6 inches to the planks prior to the thinset setting, then another layer of thinset, (supposedly after everything was dry, but I question that part about letting the bottom layer dry first) then the tile, one foot square ceramic. What ultimately happened was having the plywood between tow layers of thinset, the plywood swelled at the joints and so, not at every junction line, but following the long joint of some of them there is a long crack through the tile, in some places 13 feet long, (the kitchen and dining area is one big tiled room). I was considering pulling up the affected tiles and then a few extras in a perpendicular fashion and replacing the white marble like tile with some lines of black marblelike ceramic tile (with would match our black marblelike formica counters) and maybe some burgundy colored ones for a splash of color, so it would look like an inlaid tile pattern and not a retro-repair job. I was also considering, maybe even using a pattern of smaller tiles so that if the crack reappears it should hopefully happen in the grout line and not through the tile. Any suggestions?
     
  2. GREEN_ALIEN

    GREEN_ALIEN Sunny, Wet, Tornadoey SD!

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    Start with a grout removal tool. It is a tool with a carbide triangle on a screwdriver handle. Lowes and Home Depot both carry.

    Scrape as much of the grout out around the effected tile that you can. Follow up with a regular screwdriver to scrape out additional grout.

    Use a hammer and hit the effected tile several times in the center to break it up.

    Pry the pieces out and then scrape the thinset off the floor.

    Ted
     

  3. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    Mrs oz runs a ceramic tile business,when she gets home I will ask her what to do...when we removed our tile backsplash I used a hammer....LOL
     
  4. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    Mrs oz is here and first thing she says to do is make sure you can get a replacement tile that is the EXACT same size and thickness.

    If that works out you can follow the suggestions above except a dremel type tool is much easier to use...and once you own a dremel tool you will find a MILLION uses for it....LOL...

    Hope this helps.
     
  5. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    I have a router, and a rotozip, is there a special (I assume carbide) tip bit that I should use? Due to an arm injury, I doubt I could use a scraper on any masonry product, and the router wuld be easier than even the rotozip, in terms of me being able to handle it. I assume make several passes, gradually deepening the bit. I have a couple of left over tiles from construction time, so I dont have to pull one up to gauge the thickness. I was even considering some sort of linear mosaic with a bunch of little tiles, but we dont have a tile store here, the closest one is 90 minutes away, next closest is lowes, but small selection
     
  6. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    mrs oz here :)

    Yes, a carbide bit is what you would want. I think the mosaic idea is great. Not only may it mask any future cracking (maybe just the grout would crack and not the tile), but it's also just a great look.